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  1. #1
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    Advice needed: old steel frameset with newer groupset and wheels

    Hi Guys,

    I have 2003 Litespeed road bike and since I got it I started to replace a lot of things on it. As a result I have some parts lying around and because I want to learn as much as possible about bike maintenance I thought it'd be a good idea to build a bike from these older component.

    Obviously I will need a frame to do this and I think a used older / cheap steel frame will do it. Because I don't know anything about bike building now, I have a couple of very basic question:

    x) is it possible to put a complete Ultegra 6500 groupset on an older steel frame?
    x) what should I look for in a frame to make sure it will be compatible with my newer groupset?
    x) Is it possible to install a modern stem / handlebar on it?
    x) Is it possible to install an early 2000's mavic wheel?

    I just want to hear some opinions and starting points and I'll be fine from there.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tom25's Avatar
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    Yes you can use a 6500 group. In a frame look for Japanese or USA made frames of good steel, Adapters are made to convert to a modern stem. Steel frames can be cold set for 130mm rear hubs, but may just force them in with no issues. (Do not try this on an aluminum frame!) You will find the Classic & Vintage Forum to be a wealth of info. Have Fun.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    ^^ Don't "cold set" an aluminum frame, but I have a couple of old Cannondales with "jammed" 130mm wheels that work fine.

    OP: Yes you can build up older bikes with modern parts. 1001 ways to do it. I did with an old Cannondale and my old steel race frame.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  4. #4
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    Get on over to the CV forum, there is a big section on this with lots of pictures. I had my 84 Ciocc done up with all new Ultegra stuff, a triple 10 drive train, STI's, wheels, the works. Great to ride, no hitches to rig. I didn"t bother to "cold set" the frame, as Homebrew said i just stuck the new wheel in there, doesn't take but an ounce of thumb pressure.

    Mike
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  5. #5
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    Sure you can. 2013 campagnolo veloce on a mid 80's steel ciocc. Fit like a glove.







    Semper fi

  6. #6
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    I've converted several old steel bikes that came with 7 x 2 or 7 x 3 setups to 9 x 3 or 10 x2 with no problem. If the rear spacing is 125mm it can be cold set to a snug 130 with no problem. As long as you are replacing all of the components, the rest is just a build-up. Where people run into trouble is trying to mix and match older stuff with newer components.
    Lead, follow or get out of the way

  7. #7
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    Depending on the bike, you might have to get longer-reach brake calipers to accommodate the new 700c wheels. I got some Tektros for that when I built up my '85 Trek 400 steelie.

    I "cold set" the rear myself. No biggie. It's a great bike.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloar View Post
    Sure you can. 2013 campagnolo veloce on a mid 80's steel ciocc. Fit like a glove.
    Oh my god! It looks amazing! It makes me feel I really want to do this.
    Last edited by nemeseri; 03-21-14 at 01:07 AM.

  9. #9
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    OP, don't forget you can replace the steel fork with a 1" threadless carbon fork. Then you can use fully up-to-date stem and bars.

    You have to go back pretty far to find a 120 mm rear dropout spacing that wouldn't spread easily for a 130 mm over-locknut dimension rear wheel. And if you get a 126 mm rear-spaced frame as is more likely, you can choose whether to just spread the dropouts elastically or have them cold set to the 130 mm dimension.

    Here is my 1990 custom steel frame with carbon fork and fully modernized build up:

    BIke4.jpg

    Rival group except for Zero Gravity Ti brake calipers and FSA SLK-Light crank, 50 mm carbon wheels. The frame was already 130 mm in the rear. This was done with all new components, but used/take-offs would have worked fine too. I recommend the threadless, carbon fork approach. It really simplifies the stem and bar choices.
    Robert

    My hero: "Tar-Baby ain't sayin' nuthin'..." (Joel Chandler Harris, Uncle Remus")

  10. #10
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloar View Post
    Sure you can. 2013 campagnolo veloce on a mid 80's steel ciocc. Fit like a glove.


    Did you have the down tube cable stops welded on to that frame?

    Wouldn't it hav orginally come with brazed on pegs for DT shifters?

    For the OP, assuming the frame you get has pegs for D/T shifters, there a cable stops tha will bolt on where the D/T shifters originally went.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
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  11. #11
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    This Frameset was totally trashed when I got it. Someone cut off the top tube cable guides and the d/t bosses. I brazed the internal rear brake set up on the top tube and brazed on the d/t stops. Then repainted it.
    Semper fi

  12. #12
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    OP, don't forget you can replace the steel fork with a 1" threadless carbon fork. Then you can use fully up-to-date stem and bars.

    Or, you can buy a conversion stem for $20 that goes into your existing fork (which is imperative if you have one of the stock Italian chrome, engraved forks) and converts it to 1 1/8" new style stem/bar configuration.
    "ready to navigate"

  13. #13
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sloar View Post
    This Frameset was totally trashed when I got it. Someone cut off the top tube cable guides and the d/t bosses. I brazed the internal rear brake set up on the top tube and brazed on the d/t stops. Then repainted it.
    You did a nice job; it looks great.


    Oh also, damned fixed gear hipster ****** bags.


    Edit: Who knew you'd could say ass but not ******
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
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  14. #14
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    Frame on the right is a 1992 Paramount with 9 Speed DA. Only kinda oddball part is the 27.4mm seatpost. Came with cable stops. But still has a 1" threaded headset and quill stem.

    Frame on left is a 2005 Waterford (made in same shop) with original Sram Rival. 27.2 seatpost, 1 1/8" threadless headset, etc.


  15. #15
    South Carolina Ed
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  16. #16
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    As long as we're posting Paramount pictures:

    1989 Waterford built Paramount OS

    You could fall off a cliff and die.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bykemike View Post
    OP, don't forget you can replace the steel fork with a 1" threadless carbon fork. Then you can use fully up-to-date stem and bars.

    Or, you can buy a conversion stem for $20 that goes into your existing fork (which is imperative if you have one of the stock Italian chrome, engraved forks) and converts it to 1 1/8" new style stem/bar configuration.
    Lots of ways to skin the cat. I originally did use the converter, but decided I want to lighten the rig up a bit with the carbon fork. Was able to drop at least a pound for under $100 at the time. Fancy steel forks are nice if you care. Personally I didn't even though mine was 531 SL with an investment cast Cinelli fully sloping crown. I like the carbon better.
    Robert

    My hero: "Tar-Baby ain't sayin' nuthin'..." (Joel Chandler Harris, Uncle Remus")

  18. #18
    1coolrider arcticbiker's Avatar
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    Have fun with this upgrade, it will be fun. Here's my early 90's upgrade. It started with 7 speed, then 9, now 10. Won't go 11!

    Finding a small diameter fork steerer was a little limiting but not hard.

    Arcticbiker

  19. #19
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    If the steel frame you choose is from the late 80's or more recent (like my 1990 Concorde Aquila with Centaur, Chorus, and Veloce of more modern vintage), you won't even need to worry about spreading the wheels. Just get new cabling (assuming the BB fits) slap it together and you're good to go.

    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
    but decided I want to lighten the rig up a bit with the carbon fork. Was able to drop at least a pound for under $100 at the time. Fancy steel forks are nice if you care. Personally I didn't even though mine was 531 SL with an investment cast Cinelli fully sloping crown. I like the carbon better.
    I did the same thing. I went with a Reynolds CF fork and new headset and saved way over a pound. The carbon fork makes the bike ride completely different in a positive way.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

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