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  1. #26
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    Ok great there's a lot of info here. What are the things you look at when you suggest a bike or price range? And because of my dad's weight, what other things do I need to look into in a bike?

    And I don't think he'd give up. I think it might be the only activity that he would consider/wouldn't mind doing. He knows he has to do something other than pulling these ridiculous 2 day fasts every now and then... I'll bring it up sometime this week, see what he has to say. I think he'll be more than willing. He isn't new to fitness, he's just been lethargic for well over a decade now.

    It seems like at my budget, I could afford a good secondhand bike rather than a very low end brand new bike. Do bike shops sell used cycles? Or would I have to stick to craigslist and other mediums of the like?





    Could probably use Central Jersey or Jersey Shore lists. I'm a whopping 5'7 and my Dad is 6'1.
    Some bike shops in my area sell used bikes. Don't know about yours. . I would advise you and your Dad to spend a day or two at a couple of bike shops, maybe even take a couple of test rides.

    re: Craigslist. There are some good bikes out there, but you need to do your research. The internet is your friend. If a bike turns up, check the model name and year on Bikepedia to get a sense of whether it was a good bike when it was new. You still need to check it out in person. I take it as a given that unless the seller proves otherwise, even a well maintained used bike will need a basic tuneup, new brake pads, chain, and tires. This is cheaper if you do the repairs yourself. Not saying this to dissuade you. But you should know that a $150 Craigslist special could wind up costing you almost as much as a new bike, if you have to pay a bike shop for repairs.

    This is is why you need to know what you have. A bike that was Totl when new might be worth repairing, entry level, maybe not.
    Last edited by MRT2; 04-26-14 at 04:44 PM.

  2. #27
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    As for your Dad's weight, I weigh about 250 lbs myself. The main thing to watch for is the back wheel, as that is the part most likely to be stressed by your Dad's weight.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Some bike shops in my area sell used bikes. Don't know about yours. . I would advise you and your Dad to spend a day or two at a couple of bike shops, maybe even take a couple of test rides.

    re: Craigslist. There are some good bikes out there, but you need to do your research. The internet is your friend. If a bike turns up, check the model name and year on Bikepedia to get a sense of whether it was a good bike when it was new. You still need to check it out in person. I take it as a given that unless the seller proves otherwise, even a well maintained used bike will need a basic tuneup, new brake pads, chain, and tires. This is cheaper if you do the repairs yourself. Not saying this to dissuade you. But you should know that a $150 Craigslist special could wind up costing you almost as much as a new bike, if you have to pay a bike shop for repairs.

    This is is why you need to know what you have. A bike that was Totl when new might be worth repairing, entry level, maybe not.
    This actually sounds quite ideal. I wouldn't mind a used bike that I could order new parts to replace. Could learn a few things. I'll start browsing daily. It just sounds better buying a used bike as opposed to never really been serious about cycling and dropping at least 400 on a new bike out of no where. Stretching the process out over a few weeks sounds nicer, and kind of make it my own.



    So there isn't anything specific as far as bikes go for heavier people?

  4. #29
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    This actually sounds quite ideal. I wouldn't mind a used bike that I could order new parts to replace. Could learn a few things. I'll start browsing daily. It just sounds better buying a used bike as opposed to never really been serious about cycling and dropping at least 400 on a new bike out of no where. Stretching the process out over a few weeks sounds nicer, and kind of make it my own.



    So there isn't anything specific as far as bikes go for heavier people?
    250 lbs is heavy, but not that heavy. Not the bike, but the back wheel. 32 spoke or 36 spoke wheels are better suited to your Dad's weight. Low spoke count wheels, not so much.

  5. #30
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    You still need to decide what it is you want. Modern road bike, vintage road bike, hybrid, hard tail mountain bike, etc.

  6. #31
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    Either a modern road bike or hybrid. I've never had a road bike so the thin tires look kind of weird to me but I think I would come to like them, assuming they allow for a much smoother/faster ride. I think my Dad would prefer a hybrid for the suspension. I would have to speak with him, I still haven't mentioned any of this to him.

  7. #32
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    Either a modern road bike or hybrid. I've never had a road bike so the thin tires look kind of weird to me but I think I would come to like them, assuming they allow for a much smoother/faster ride. I think my Dad would prefer a hybrid for the suspension. I would have to speak with him, I still haven't mentioned any of this to him.
    Lighter, yes. Faster yes. More responsive? Likely. Smoother? Hardly. The wider the tire, the better the ride quality other things being equal. (Of course, they are not always equal). I ride a 700 x 32c tire on my road bike, which is pretty plush for a road bike, but still fairly fast. Today I rode my mountain bike with 26 x 1.85 inch semi slick tires and if my road bike is a Honda, the mountain bike felt like a Cadillac. No suspension on my mountain bike, just a wider tire makes for a smoother ride. So if your Dad wants a smooth ride, consider going a size or two up in tires rather than paying for suspension, which IMO is an abomination.

    Again, stay away from suspension forks and seat posts if you want to ride on the roads. They add weight, and the cheap ones generally suck. Even worse for heavier guys as they bob up and down sucking efficiency from each pedal stroke, which is annoying. The expensive ones don't suck, but they cost as much as some people spend for a whole bike.
    Last edited by MRT2; 04-26-14 at 07:09 PM.

  8. #33
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    Good to know.
    And I just figured being heavier would put even more stress on the back tire, and suspension would relieve some of that.

    Also maybe lessen the impact on his back cause I know that bothers him from time to time. Is this an incorrect assumption?
    Last edited by ssnova12; 04-26-14 at 07:04 PM.

  9. #34
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    Good to know.
    And I just figured being heavier would put even more stress on the back tire, and suspension would relieve some of that.
    Being heavier does stress the back wheel. Which is why your Dad needs to have a bike with a strong back wheel. Don't know if weight stresses tires. I think total miles, the type of riding, and maybe the condition of local roads affects tire wear more.
    Last edited by MRT2; 04-26-14 at 07:12 PM.

  10. #35
    Squeaky Bottom Bracket uluchay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    Good to know.
    And I just figured being heavier would put even more stress on the back tire, and suspension would relieve some of that.

    Also maybe lessen the impact on his back cause I know that bothers him from time to time. Is this an incorrect assumption?
    This is an incorrect assumption yes.

    I guess you're just confused about the whole suspension thing. Mountain bikes have suspension, road bikes don't.

    Excluding the all-carbon frames (top of the line), road bikes have carbon fiber forks (most low-end road bikes) and sometimes carbon fiber seat stays. These act similar to a suspension on a mountain bike and dampens the road vibration, making a smoother ride. A carbon fiber seat post is also a good option and you can find one relatively cheap.

    Mountain bikes use suspensions because of their jumpy and high adrenaline nature. XC and Hardtrail mountain bikes usually have just the front suspension. Downhill bikes have two suspensions because they're designed to do one simple thing: "go downhill"

    Hybrids (at least low-end models) usually do not feature neither a suspension nor a carbon fiber fork.

    Carbon fiber = Light.
    Suspension = Heavy.

    Technically speaking, road cycling is all about weight and aerodynamics. Any additional weight (even a full water bottle) will make you suffer on a steep climb.


    So to suggest a few things:

    Suspension: NO
    Carbon fiber fork: YES
    Smooth ride: 700x28c tires at mid pressure
    Dad's weight issue: 36 or 34 spoke wheels (also gives smoother ride)


    Hope it helps.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by uluchay View Post
    This is an incorrect assumption yes.

    I guess you're just confused about the whole suspension thing. Mountain bikes have suspension, road bikes don't.

    Excluding the all-carbon frames (top of the line), road bikes have carbon fiber forks (most low-end road bikes) and sometimes carbon fiber seat stays. These act similar to a suspension on a mountain bike and dampens the road vibration, making a smoother ride. A carbon fiber seat post is also a good option and you can find one relatively cheap.

    Mountain bikes use suspensions because of their jumpy and high adrenaline nature. XC and Hardtrail mountain bikes usually have just the front suspension. Downhill bikes have two suspensions because they're designed to do one simple thing: "go downhill"

    Hybrids (at least low-end models) usually do not feature neither a suspension nor a carbon fiber fork.

    Carbon fiber = Light.
    Suspension = Heavy.

    Technically speaking, road cycling is all about weight and aerodynamics. Any additional weight (even a full water bottle) will make you suffer on a steep climb.


    So to suggest a few things:

    Suspension: NO
    Carbon fiber fork: YES
    Smooth ride: 700x28c tires at mid pressure
    Dad's weight issue: 36 or 34 spoke wheels (also gives smoother ride)


    Hope it helps.
    Wow that is a huge oversight on my part. I do full time maintenance and I NEED a lot of food/snacks. Last summer I always brought a cooler with me. Easily 10 lbs with ice etc.

    Anything carbon fiber sounds expensive. Do you think that is necessary?

  12. #37
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    Wow that is a huge oversight on my part. I do full time maintenance and I NEED a lot of food/snacks. Last summer I always brought a cooler with me. Easily 10 lbs with ice etc.

    Anything carbon fiber sounds expensive. Do you think that is necessary?
    CF can be expensive. While a bike with a cf fork is something to look for, don't discard a bike that doesn't have one, either. Lots if nice and relatively light bikes also have chromoly steel forks. While you don't want to limit yourself by buying a 40 lb tank, carrying an extra water bottle on a ride isn't a big deal either. I go out on long rides carrying 2 full water bottles, spare tube, frame pump, tire levers, multi tool and lock, and don't think the extra couple of lbs made me suffer worse on hills than the extra 50 lbs I carry on my body.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post

    Anything carbon fiber sounds expensive. Do you think that is necessary?
    No.
    You need a decent bike that is comfortable, fits the person, and is suited to the style of riding.

    It's not really that complicated. A road bike ("racing" type bike with drop bars) that has clearance for 28 mm tires will give you a comfortable ride. A hybrid with mid-width slick tires will give you a comfortable ride on the road.
    Last edited by Homebrew01; 04-27-14 at 11:28 AM.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  14. #39
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    Just what exactly is wrong with your Kawasaki?

    I'm most certain that the frame and most of the components are sound. If that's the case, then just pay for upgrades on the Kawasaki. Perhaps you could even join a bicycle co-op in order to repair and upgrade your own bike.

    Once your Kawasaki is squared away, then start talking to your Dad about his future bike. Perhaps, they'll even have some good prospective bicycle candidates at the co-op already.

    Save mucho dinero $$$

    Learn to do your own wrenching...
    Last edited by WestPablo; 04-27-14 at 04:20 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    CF can be expensive. While a bike with a cf fork is something to look for, don't discard a bike that doesn't have one, either. Lots if nice and relatively light bikes also have chromoly steel forks. While you don't want to limit yourself by buying a 40 lb tank, carrying an extra water bottle on a ride isn't a big deal either. I go out on long rides carrying 2 full water bottles, spare tube, frame pump, tire levers, multi tool and lock, and don't think the extra couple of lbs made me suffer worse on hills than the extra 50 lbs I carry on my body.
    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
    No.
    You need a decent bike that is comfortable, fits the person, and is suited to the style of riding.

    It's not really that complicated. A road bike ("racing" type bike with drop bars) that has clearance for 28 mm tires will give you a comfortable ride. A hybrid with mid-width slick tires will give you a comfortable ride on the road.
    I'll look into this. Thank you.


    Quote Originally Posted by WestPablo View Post
    Just what exactly is wrong with your Nishiki?

    I'm most certain that the frame and most of the components are sound. If that's the case, then just pay for upgrades on the Nishiki. Perhaps you could even join a bicycle co-op in order to repair and upgrade your own bike.

    Once your Nishiki is squared away, then start talking to your Dad about his future bike. Perhaps, they'll even have some good prospective bicycle candidates at the co-op already.

    Save mucho dinero $$$

    Learn to do your own wrenching...
    I guess there is some similarity between Nishiki and Kawasaki? But this is my exact bike I got in like 7th grade and used it all the time until I got my permit in ~10th grade. I've replaced the derailleur on it once and it has seen MANY flats. Also I banged up the back tire pretty bad in middleschool when I slammed on my brakes and my friend behind me slammed perfectly into the tire.

    I haven't used it in years and it has been either outside or in the open shed the whole time. I can upload some pictures of it next time I am home for you all to see.

    Kawasaki KDX 226FS

    518S75XXGNL.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    I'll look into this. Thank you.




    I guess there is some similarity between Nishiki and Kawasaki? But this is my exact bike I got in like 7th grade and used it all the time until I got my permit in ~10th grade. I've replaced the derailleur on it once and it has seen MANY flats. Also I banged up the back tire pretty bad in middleschool when I slammed on my brakes and my friend behind me slammed perfectly into the tire.

    I haven't used it in years and it has been either outside or in the open shed the whole time. I can upload some pictures of it next time I am home for you all to see.

    Kawasaki KDX 226FS

    518S75XXGNL.jpg
    Since it's FS, you just might wanna start with a nice used ht mtb. Those FS mtbikes are just a tad too draining for anything other than dedicated mtbiking.

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    Yeah that seems to be the consensus about suspension. I'll start researching and getting answers to all of my questions that I haven't been sharing to start tying all of this info together when I find a good amount of free time. As well as visit some shops. Probably wont be until next weekend. I think I'd like to have a bike of my own by Memorial Day, we'll see about my Dad.

  18. #43
    Senior Member goenrdoug's Avatar
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    You guys might both be well suited to hybrids for the moment. Keep in mind that you don't want to be on some super bike while your Dad lumbers down the road on some mountain bike. They have to be somewhere in the same ball park or you're both not going to enjoy the rides for very long. With Dad's back issues and weight, etc. it might be good if he started out with something a bit more upright but not quite a beach cruiser or something. A quick look at the NJ CL:

    Cannondale R800 -- decent looking road bike for YOU. Not sure about price or year. Ask seller about tires, year, etc. and refer to bikepedia for general price guidelines.
    Trek 7.2 FX 15" Charcoal -- I really wanted to suggest this one, but it's too small for you. It's exactly the kind of thing that might be perfect for you guys.
    TREK 1220 ZX -- maybe for Dad? carefully check condition. Rotate bars up.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by goenrdoug View Post
    You guys might both be well suited to hybrids for the moment. Keep in mind that you don't want to be on some super bike while your Dad lumbers down the road on some mountain bike. They have to be somewhere in the same ball park or you're both not going to enjoy the rides for very long. With Dad's back issues and weight, etc. it might be good if he started out with something a bit more upright but not quite a beach cruiser or something. A quick look at the NJ CL:

    Cannondale R800 -- decent looking road bike for YOU. Not sure about price or year. Ask seller about tires, year, etc. and refer to bikepedia for general price guidelines.
    Trek 7.2 FX 15" Charcoal -- I really wanted to suggest this one, but it's too small for you. It's exactly the kind of thing that might be perfect for you guys.
    TREK 1220 ZX -- maybe for Dad? carefully check condition. Rotate bars up.
    Damn that Trek 7.2 looks really nice. I'll keep this in mind as a reference. And yes I wouldn't make the difference in quality too great. That would be unfair and disrespectful.

  20. #45
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    I agree, if you want to save money, learn to do your own wrenching. Saves so much money. Just be careful to triple check the directions and triple check what you are doing so you don't ruin your bike. Never underestimate the simplicity of something. I ruined a crank because I assumed pedals didn't have right and a left. Wrong, expensive replacement.

    Maybe you can try a shop that sells used bikes, I only know of one around here and they barely have any selection worth raving about. At least you can ride and find out what size bike you need.
    Last edited by zymphad; 04-27-14 at 10:15 PM.

  21. #46
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    So I have not had nearly as much time as I planned. Finals are sucking it all up. All I've been really doing is browsing CL every now and then.

    Would something like this work? Or at least something I should be looking for? There's no suspension but I do see some kind of coil-like object on the seat post. What is that?

    What are things about this bike I should stay away from? Trek and Specialized are really the only two brands I know of and that is what I type in the search bar. I want to stay away from those curved handle bars, I've never ridden anything with them.

    Beautiful Red Mens Specialized Bike

  22. #47
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    You could get a new BikesDirect for the same price and have warranty. BikesDirect are known for good CS.

  23. #48
    Senior Member Nachoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
    You could get a new BikesDirect for the same price and have warranty. BikesDirect are known for good CS.
    .
    .

    Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.

  24. #49
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssnova12 View Post
    So I have not had nearly as much time as I planned. Finals are sucking it all up. All I've been really doing is browsing CL every now and then.

    Would something like this work? Or at least something I should be looking for? There's no suspension but I do see some kind of coil-like object on the seat post. What is that?

    What are things about this bike I should stay away from? Trek and Specialized are really the only two brands I know of and that is what I type in the search bar. I want to stay away from those curved handle bars, I've never ridden anything with them.

    Beautiful Red Mens Specialized Bike
    Hard to tell what model it is exactly because the seller HIDES THE DRIVE SIDE in the photos, but it looks like a nice bike. Dunno if worth $325 for a seven year old used bike, but it looks nice. I don't think that bike sold for $1,000 new as generally, higher end bikes didn't come with crappy suspension seatposts. Also seller has no clue about size. 54"? I don't think so. Looks fairly small. Worth checking out, though the price is too high, IMO. Just because the bike looks clean doesn't mean it doesn't have worn tires, chain, or brake pads, or that the bike doesn't need some minor adjustments.

    That coil like object is a suspension seatpost. They generally suck. I would recommend you replace it ASAP if you buy that bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
    You could get a new BikesDirect for the same price and have warranty. BikesDirect are known for good CS.
    Could something like this work? Also how do you go through with the Warranty on this site?
    Road Bikes - Dawes Lightning DT

    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Hard to tell what model it is exactly because the seller HIDES THE DRIVE SIDE in the photos, but it looks like a nice bike. Dunno if worth $325 for a seven year old used bike, but it looks nice. I don't think that bike sold for $1,000 new as generally, higher end bikes didn't come with crappy suspension seatposts. Also seller has no clue about size. 54"? I don't think so. Looks fairly small. Worth checking out, though the price is too high, IMO. Just because the bike looks clean doesn't mean it doesn't have worn tires, chain, or brake pads, or that the bike doesn't need some minor adjustments.

    That coil like object is a suspension seatpost. They generally suck. I would recommend you replace it ASAP if you buy that bike.
    Good to know. I probably wont contact this guy, not ready for a purchase just yet.

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