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  1. #1
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    Complete beginner pedal advice!

    After of years of using a hybrid bike, I'm thinking of getting an entry-level road bike. I'm looking to buy an entry level Cube Peloton Compact Road Bike - Easton 2013

    As I've never used clip-less pedals before, I would like to get used to the bike before I decide whether I take the plunge! Having done a little on-line research, I'm thinking to using the platform pedals that I'm used to but with strap-less toe-clips. Is this advisable?!

    I was looking to use a MKS Half Deep Section Toe Clip with a regular platform pedal. Do I need to purchase a special platform pedal, or can I use the ones off my hybrid?

    As you can tell, I don't know much about road bikes, so any advice would be welcomed!!

  2. #2
    A might bewildered... Dudelsack's Avatar
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    I'm not a search function nazi, but there most be twenty threads on pedals in the last thirty days.

    What Kind of Bike Pedals Should You Use?

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    Senior Member seymour1910's Avatar
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    clipless pedals are not the horror story some will make them out to be. I started with clipless pedals right out the gate and never had an issue. When you get them just practice on a trainer or in a door frame. Clip in and out 30-50 times each side. Find a parking lot or any place with no traffic and practice coming to a stop. Try coming to an abrupt stop and clipping out. You will be fine. Remember to unclip BEFORE you get to the stop sign.

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    A might bewildered... Dudelsack's Avatar
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    Anyway, let me tell you what to get: Shimano M324s with SH 56 cleats and attach them to some inexpensive mountain bike shoes.

    Go in peace.

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    Senior Member danmc's Avatar
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    The first time out wear full hockey goalie padding. I'm joking, kind of, not, seriously. I tore up my knee, elbow, and hand the first time out but I was stupid and went on the MUP instead of the road. But ever since haven't fallen once and am not worried at all that I will. It becomes natural pretty quickly.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tim_Iowa's Avatar
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    If your current hybrid platform pedals have screw/bolt -in reflectors, than you should be able to attach the MKS Half clips.

    However, I don't think you'll gain much from those small clips. In my experience with toe clips (full size, admittedly), they would often get in the way of pedaling and I found them annoying. Plus, the half clips would not be a good transition to clipless, because the release action is totally different (pull up/back for toe clips, push/twist out for clipless).

    Don't be afraid of clipless pedals.

    My recommendations:
    Get Shimano SPD clips. They're the cheapest, most common, and they can be recessed into the shoe sole so you can walk like a normal person, not like a chicken with protruding clips.
    Get a dual-sided (platform on one side, clip on the other) pedals so you can ride in normal or clip shoes. The shimano A530 and M324's are both good.
    Practice. Lean against a door, a wall, or have someone hold up your shoulders, and practice clipping in, and twisting out.
    Clip out deliberately. You already shift down deliberately when you approach a stop, so clip out a foot at the same time.

    Eventually you get the hang of pushing/twisting outward to clip out, instead of trying to raise/remove your foot. I've fallen a couple times because I forget that and try to pull my foot out of the clip--it doesn't work that way.

  7. #7
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    Contrary to suggestions, I got SPD-SL clip-ins, R540, they are cheap. It's been a few weeks now, have yet to fall. No practicing leaning against doors. I'll use a backpack with my lock and extra shoes when commuting to class or work.

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    I own clipless, and I've gone through a number of both road and mountain bike pedal and shoe combinations, and I'm seriously considering dropping them completely. Haven't done it yet, but I've just been finding that it just isn't a huge difference in speed, and despite having gotten over the learning curve and everything, clipless is still slightly annoying.

    I'd personally suggest just getting a good pair of platform pedals, like these (WELLGO Alloy BMX Mountain Bike Pedals Sealed 9/16"):
    Amazon.com: Wellgo Alloy BMX Sealed Mountain Bike Pedal, 9/16-Inch, Black: Sports & Outdoors

    And seeing how it goes. If you want to get clipless later, than get full clipless. I've really started to feel like anything in between is not worth it. I don't think toe clips will realistically add anything to your speed or cycling, other than being annoying in needing to always have one side of the pedal up (with 2 sided pedals, you'll get used to being able to stop and start without even looking down at the pedal, it's nicer at intersections not having to look down).

  9. #9
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    Thanks all for the advice! Much appreciated.

    I think I might get used to the bike using my existing platforms and then I might be brave enough to give the clipless a go!

  10. #10
    Senior Member pavemen's Avatar
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    I jumped right into riding with SPD cleats/pedals. Only testing I did was while adjusting the tension before my first ride. Easy enough to catch on to and is second nature now and its only been 5 months with them. In fact even screwing around on my kids bike with platforms I make the motion to unclip out of habit. Just get the type of cleat/pedal you are comfortable with shoes that work for your intended use

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by egareth View Post
    Thanks all for the advice! Much appreciated.

    I think I might get used to the bike using my existing platforms and then I might be brave enough to give the clipless a go!
    Clipless are really no big deal, I guess I can understand the fear, but actually I can't. It took me half a short ride to figure my first pair out. They actually make cycling easier. Just go start on a quiet residential street or parking lot until you get the hang of it. I recommend SPDs as well. The M324s Dudelsack recommends are also platforms so no biggie if you have trouble engaging, you're on a platform pedal anyways, but I would commit and go for a set of double-sided SPDs. The M520 are the cheapest and work great, if you want more of a platform get the M530s. Double-sided are great for beginners or anyone, because you just step down, you don't have to worry about if the pedal is aligned correctly or try to spin it around etc.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by egareth View Post
    Thanks all for the advice! Much appreciated.

    I think I might get used to the bike using my existing platforms and then I might be brave enough to give the clipless a go!
    That's what I would do, have fun. :-)

  13. #13
    Senior Member Gus90's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niloc View Post
    Clipless are really no big deal, I guess I can understand the fear, but actually I can't. It took me half a short ride to figure my first pair out. They actually make cycling easier. Just go start on a quiet residential street or parking lot until you get the hang of it. I recommend SPDs as well. The M324s Dudelsack recommends are also platforms so no biggie if you have trouble engaging, you're on a platform pedal anyways, but I would commit and go for a set of double-sided SPDs. The M520 are the cheapest and work great, if you want more of a platform get the M530s. Double-sided are great for beginners or anyone, because you just step down, you don't have to worry about if the pedal is aligned correctly or try to spin it around etc.
    +1 on the double sided SPDs, that's how I started and still have them on my hybrid and newer CX. I put Look Keo 2 Maxs on my road bike and it took some getting used to. At first I found it difficult after I stop and start going again to the flip the pedal to the right side so I could clip in. After a while though, piece of cake

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