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  1. #26
    I got 99 problems.... thump55's Avatar
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    Between two pillows.

  2. #27
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
    And conversely the closer to the stem you are the less impact a sudden jarring and subsequent movement of your arm will have on the stability of the bike.
    Why would your arm move? While I can certainly have the hand anywhere, further out gets you more leverage for stability should you hit a hole, piece of gravel, etc. I routinely hit the low kinds of speed bumps at 30mph+ one handed.

  3. #28
    Senior Member RPK79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
    Why would your arm move? While I can certainly have the hand anywhere, further out gets you more leverage for stability should you hit a hole, piece of gravel, etc. I routinely hit the low kinds of speed bumps at 30mph+ one handed.
    Unexpectedly? If you unexpectedly hit a bump that jars you and causes you to move the bars the effect is lessened by having your hand closer to the stem.

  4. #29
    Super Moderator BillyD's Avatar
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    I'm most comfortable with my hand out by the hood. I feel it gives me more options, more controllability out there, less controlability in by the stem.
    Where else but the internet can a bunch of cyclists go and be the tough guy? - - jdon
    Titanium Division

  5. #30
    Super Moderator BillyD's Avatar
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    Wonder where THIS guy's hand was? Ouch!
    Where else but the internet can a bunch of cyclists go and be the tough guy? - - jdon
    Titanium Division

  6. #31
    Still can't climb
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyD View Post
    I'm most comfortable with my hand out by the hood. I feel it gives me more options, more controllability out there, less controlability in by the stem.

    i find being too far out means small moves create bigger directional shifts so less stable.
    coasting, few quotes are worthy of him, and of those, even fewer printable in a family forum......quote 3alarmer

  7. #32
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
    Unexpectedly? If you unexpectedly hit a bump that jars you and causes you to move the bars the effect is lessened by having your hand closer to the stem.
    In CD's example and in any other where the rider's body is off balance and exaggerating movement on the bars, you're absolutely better off near the center.

    But in most actual riding situations, your body won't be off balance or moving much at all so this is not an issue. As you go further out, you get more options though learning how to exercise those options takes a little finesse. You can hit things much harder one handed than anyone is going to be able to do near the stem for the simple reason that once in awhile you actually need the leverage.

    The key is to relax and supply just a gentle touch -- it takes very little to keep a bike on track. If you muscle things, you'll absolutely screw things up as you'll supply destabilizing forces. Muscling from near the stem has the effect of a gentler touch, but that doesn't mean that's a better place to work from than just supplying the right amount of force from the get go.

    But overall, I think you want to be able to ride with your hand anywhere.

  8. #33
    Member vstkrc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPK79 View Post
    Unexpectedly? If you unexpectedly hit a bump that jars you and causes you to move the bars the effect is lessened by having your hand closer to the stem.
    Yes, that's very easy to understand mechanically speaking, but practically, being in the drops is likely more helpful because you maintain a strong grip and are ready to brake if necessary. As carpediem said, being on the hoods is the worst because it places you weight forward and off-center and with less of a grip, so it is the most dangerous.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyD View Post
    Wonder where THIS guy's hand was? Ouch!
    Im in Huntington Beach , I'm still flying high for all the morphine they gave yesterday.

    Don't drink n ride !!! Lol

  10. #35
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lgp927 View Post
    Im in Huntington Beach , I'm still flying high for all the morphine they gave yesterday.

    Don't drink n ride !!! Lol
    Last July I crashed on a State road and ended up having my C1 & C2 fused. Two surgeries (5 hr & 4 hr) and 8 days in the hospital. I totally feel (felt?) your pain. Hang in there. It will get better. FWIW I was back on the bike the following November and am riding better than ever now. At age 67 I think that's about as much as I could expect. Actually much more than everyone around me expected. Best of luck.

  11. #36
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
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    The OP asked "Where is the best place...." That word "best" is certainly open to definition. If best means what works for or is comfortable for an individual rider the answers will be many and varied. But, if by best he is looking for what is most stable from a mechanical perspective there actually is a right answer.....near the stem. It just is.

  12. #37
    Senior Member
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    With four decades of one handed road riding since my left arm went missing at the shoulder, this is probably the only topic you could come up with where I have an informed point of view, rather than just a point of view. My informed point of view is there is no right answer, like so many things in life.

    Regardless of where your hand rests, if you hit an unexpected bump and lose hand contact with the bike, you are pretty much toast. I have a titanium structure supporting my hip that testifies to this. The only answer is eternal vigilance (impossible at my advanced age) or a bike fit that gives you a light hand but strong grip.

    Using this theory, I am equally comfortable and stable on the top, hood or drop. Spending a lot of time no handed is also great training.

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