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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

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Old 05-21-14, 11:50 AM   #1
mike12
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Trek Boone

Has anyone took a ride on one? Possible comparison to a Domane?

I'm wondering what the ride would be like on longer rides (say over 60 miles).
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Old 05-22-14, 02:12 PM   #2
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Too new or just no interest in a cross bike used as a rode bike?
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Old 05-22-14, 02:44 PM   #3
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Maybe try the cyclocross forum?
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Old 05-22-14, 03:51 PM   #4
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I ride a cross bike as a road bike, so I guess I can share some of my experience despite never having ridden the Boone. A cross bike is typically slower than a road bike on the road, but to such a small degree as to be imperceptible to nearly any rider. With some high-quality tires (like these), you'll get a very smooth ride and give up virtually nothing in rolling resistance to a road bike.

If anything, longer rides would be more comfortable on a cross bike, since the position is usually more upright (this accounts for part of the speed difference) and the tires offer more cushion. I've done a century on mine, plus lots of shorter rides. No complaints at all with either comfort or speed.
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Old 05-22-14, 05:37 PM   #5
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I haven't ridden the Boone. I havent seen one in my local trek dealer yet. They don't usually have cyclocross bikes in stock except the CrossRip.

I do have a Crockett which I use as a commuter/cross bike. It has the same geometry as the Boone. So it should handle the same, but the Boone should be a more comfortable ride.

The Domane has a more relaxed geometry. For the same size frame the Domane has a taller head tube, the stack height is higher, and the reach is shorter.

The Boone is closer in fit to a H2 geometry Madone. With the same frame size the Madone has the same reach, and slightly larger stack measurement. If you want the added compliance from the isospeed decoupler, but prefer the fit of the Madone the Boone may be worth a look.

I find my Crockett handles fine on the road. I have a size 52 frame and have a little toe overlap, but not nearly as much as my road bike. I might be slightly slower due to a number of reasons, but it still rides really nice and I would have no problem doing centuries on it. The larger tires/heavier wheels will spin up a little slower. My fit is closer to my mountain bike fit, and more upright and relaxed than my road bike fit. If I used my road bikes wheels and fit the main difference would be the cross bike is a few pounds heavier, and has lower gearing.

The biggest difference is the room for larger tires, and the brakes. The larger tires make for a pretty plush ride on the road. I was surprised how comfortable I was taking it off road. I'm used to using a dual suspension mountain bike off road. The downside was the brakes. I have cantilevers on it right now. They are a hassle to get dialed in where there is no squealing or brake shudder. They don't stop as well as the brakes on my road bike, and the discs on my mountain bike. I am going to switch them out for mini V brakes soon to see if they are any better.

I don't see the Boone as direct competition for the Domane. The geometry is too different. If you need a relaxed geometry bike like the Domane or a Specialized Roubaix the Domane is probably the better choice. If you have a need for more tire clearance, or the Domane geometry is too relaxed for you the Boone might work.

Comfort wise my Crockett is just as comfortable as my road bike (a BMC Team Machine). Probably even more comfortable. For long rides I usually would choose my road bike since it is about 4 pounds lighter, especially if its hilly. If the roads are rough I would have no problem using my cross bike.
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Old 05-22-14, 09:06 PM   #6
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Amazing that was thinking along the same lines tonight. I was wondering how wide of a tire can fit on a Domane, which then led me to thinking if the Boone series is simply a wide-tired Domane? I'm looking for the best comfort ride I can get on a road bike. Thanks for the breakdown on the geometry, is given me more to think about.
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Old 05-22-14, 09:22 PM   #7
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Amazing that was thinking along the same lines tonight. I was wondering how wide of a tire can fit on a Domane, which then led me to thinking if the Boone series is simply a wide-tired Domane?
From what I have read the Domane should probably fit up to 28's. Some tires run larger than others so I can't guarantee all 28's will work.

I'm currently running 35's on my Crockett. For a tire without large knobs I could maybe go a few mm larger, but not too much. The Boone should have similar tire clearance.
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Old 05-23-14, 07:54 AM   #8
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I haven't ridden the Boone. I havent seen one in my local trek dealer yet. They don't usually have cyclocross bikes in stock except the CrossRip.

I do have a Crockett which I use as a commuter/cross bike. It has the same geometry as the Boone. So it should handle the same, but the Boone should be a more comfortable ride.

The Domane has a more relaxed geometry. For the same size frame the Domane has a taller head tube, the stack height is higher, and the reach is shorter.

The Boone is closer in fit to a H2 geometry Madone. With the same frame size the Madone has the same reach, and slightly larger stack measurement. If you want the added compliance from the isospeed decoupler, but prefer the fit of the Madone the Boone may be worth a look.

I find my Crockett handles fine on the road. I have a size 52 frame and have a little toe overlap, but not nearly as much as my road bike. I might be slightly slower due to a number of reasons, but it still rides really nice and I would have no problem doing centuries on it. The larger tires/heavier wheels will spin up a little slower. My fit is closer to my mountain bike fit, and more upright and relaxed than my road bike fit. If I used my road bikes wheels and fit the main difference would be the cross bike is a few pounds heavier, and has lower gearing.

The biggest difference is the room for larger tires, and the brakes. The larger tires make for a pretty plush ride on the road. I was surprised how comfortable I was taking it off road. I'm used to using a dual suspension mountain bike off road. The downside was the brakes. I have cantilevers on it right now. They are a hassle to get dialed in where there is no squealing or brake shudder. They don't stop as well as the brakes on my road bike, and the discs on my mountain bike. I am going to switch them out for mini V brakes soon to see if they are any better.

I don't see the Boone as direct competition for the Domane. The geometry is too different. If you need a relaxed geometry bike like the Domane or a Specialized Roubaix the Domane is probably the better choice. If you have a need for more tire clearance, or the Domane geometry is too relaxed for you the Boone might work.

Comfort wise my Crockett is just as comfortable as my road bike (a BMC Team Machine). Probably even more comfortable. For long rides I usually would choose my road bike since it is about 4 pounds lighter, especially if its hilly. If the roads are rough I would have no problem using my cross bike.
Thanks for the thorough response. My specific situation is that I had a 4 series Domane that I crashed & ruined. I had used that bike on gravel grinders using 28's (to help with side_FX's comment) and as my long distance road bike. I was planning on getting a project 1 Domane to replace the one I crashed, but I'm hesitant on taking the project 1 with the nice paint job on the gravel rides. Also, I may want to try some CX racing later on.

So I'm thinking about getting a Boone and using it as the long distance bike, CX bike and gravel grinder.

Now for the more technical question since you seem to understand bike geometry better than I do. On my Domane there were originally 3 spacers on the stem under the bar. I rode it with 2 of the spacers over the bars. Would that change in spacer position (therefore changing the stack height I assume) make the Boone's geometry similar to what I was riding with the Domane?

Thanks.
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Old 05-23-14, 09:11 AM   #9
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Thanks for the thorough response. My specific situation is that I had a 4 series Domane that I crashed & ruined. I had used that bike on gravel grinders using 28's (to help with side_FX's comment) and as my long distance road bike. I was planning on getting a project 1 Domane to replace the one I crashed, but I'm hesitant on taking the project 1 with the nice paint job on the gravel rides. Also, I may want to try some CX racing later on.

So I'm thinking about getting a Boone and using it as the long distance bike, CX bike and gravel grinder.

Now for the more technical question since you seem to understand bike geometry better than I do. On my Domane there were originally 3 spacers on the stem under the bar. I rode it with 2 of the spacers over the bars. Would that change in spacer position (therefore changing the stack height I assume) make the Boone's geometry similar to what I was riding with the Domane?

Thanks.
Depending on the frame size the stack height difference is around 1.5-2CM between the Domane and the Boone. Assuming you want to replicate your position in the Domane on the Boone you would need to move 1.5 to 2CM of spacers from above the stem to below the stem. To adjust for the reach difference you might want a shorter stem on the Boone.

That will get the stack and reach close which will put you in a similar riding position. The rest of the geometry is different though. The seat tube angle, head tube angle, chainstay length and a number of other measurements differ. That will make the Boone handle different than the Domane. As long as you are ok with that the Boone may be exactly what you are looking for.
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Old 05-23-14, 09:32 AM   #10
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Depending on the frame size the stack height difference is around 1.5-2CM between the Domane and the Boone. Assuming you want to replicate your position in the Domane on the Boone you would need to move 1.5 to 2CM of spacers from above the stem to below the stem. To adjust for the reach difference you might want a shorter stem on the Boone.

That will get the stack and reach close which will put you in a similar riding position. The rest of the geometry is different though. The seat tube angle, head tube angle, chainstay length and a number of other measurements differ. That will make the Boone handle different than the Domane. As long as you are ok with that the Boone may be exactly what you are looking for.
Thanks again. It looks like I was on the right track. I've just got to make up my mind on what to get. The one bike to do all these things really interests me.
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Old 05-26-14, 05:46 AM   #11
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I'm in this same boat - finding the one bike for everything and I'm torn between a Boone 5 Disc and Domane 4.0 Disc. I cannot test either and somehow would need to decide between them. Unfortunately neither comes with full hydraulic brakes.

Apparently Domane 4.0 Disc can fit wider tires, but Trek's official stance seems to be 25c is the max size. Can I expect issues if I fit 28c or 30c tires on it?

Ville
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Old 06-28-14, 10:31 PM   #12
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I know this thread is a little old, but if the OP (or last poster) hasn't decided on their choice yet I'll throw in my 2 cents. I just finished a 242 mile ride on a gravel trail (Katy Trail in Missouri) on a Boone 9 disk with a Sram Red group. The bike is flawless. I didn't stop overnight, just rode straight through and had no comfort issues. Obviously my butt and legs are sore, but unless you find a bike with a Lazyboy built in it would be hard for me to imagine anything more comfortable over that much time. I'm sure the Domane with 25's or 28's is great, I've never been on one, but the Boone with 32's at 75 psi was amazing.
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Old 07-19-14, 08:12 AM   #13
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I am considering the Boone 5 but still trying to justify the 3k+ expenditure. Any thoughts?
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Old 08-02-14, 07:39 AM   #14
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I know this thread is a little old, but if the OP (or last poster) hasn't decided on their choice yet I'll throw in my 2 cents. I just finished a 242 mile ride on a gravel trail (Katy Trail in Missouri) on a Boone 9 disk with a Sram Red group. The bike is flawless. I didn't stop overnight, just rode straight through and had no comfort issues. Obviously my butt and legs are sore, but unless you find a bike with a Lazyboy built in it would be hard for me to imagine anything more comfortable over that much time. I'm sure the Domane with 25's or 28's is great, I've never been on one, but the Boone with 32's at 75 psi was amazing.
STLCARDS, I have a Boone disc and was also looking to upgrade to Sram Red. What crankset and cassette did you go with?
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Old 08-02-14, 05:28 PM   #15
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I test rode a Boone this past week. Great bike. Definitely on my "want" list !
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Old 08-02-14, 08:22 PM   #16
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STLCARDS, I have a Boone disc and was also looking to upgrade to Sram Red. What crankset and cassette did you go with?
It actually has a Force crank with 46/36 chainrings, the rest is Red. 12-25 on the rear end.
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Old 11-19-14, 02:39 PM   #17
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I have owned a boone for the past month or so and i can definitely say that it's the best cross bike i have ever ridden so far. Very responsive, tracks well and kicks out of corners well. I have a few complaints though: It is incredibly hard to thread cables and outers through the frame due to cut outs to allow for more mud clearance but a more major issue I have just been alerted of when my bike went in for service is that the carbon around the bottom bracket is now an oval shape instead of circular. This meant that the pressfit BB was secure and had a small gap around it letting more water than normal in (from the ground or pressure washers) this led to the BB rusting quickly so needed replacing. The BB actually came out very easily which shouldnt be the case due to it being press fit. The bike has now been sent back to trek who are going to somehow fix the problem so will report back when it comes back
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Old 11-19-14, 04:05 PM   #18
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I'm the original poster and purchased a Boone 7 near the end of June. I upgraded it to Force22 and purchased a second wheelset - aero. So far I've put 3,409 miles on it with the longest single ride being 125 miles. I have not used it as a cross bike but have done a 60 mile gravel grinder with some pretty tough descents - there were a bunch of mountain bikes at this event. Have also used on various gravel rides. It suites my needs perfectly and am glad I got one. It certainly is a capable road bike which is what I was worried about.

At 2,500 miles I had the bottom bracket replaced as it was worn. I bought the Trek Care Plus (which is no longer offered) so they replaced it free of charge. I'll keep an eye on things to see if I've got the same issue b1k3rguy had.
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Old 11-19-14, 04:49 PM   #19
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Haven't seen in any stores either.

Domane can't fit 28mm tires? What would be the difference from riding a Domane Disc?
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Old 09-09-15, 05:53 PM   #20
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I have owned a boone for the past month or so and i can definitely say that it's the best cross bike i have ever ridden so far. Very responsive, tracks well and kicks out of corners well. I have a few complaints though: It is incredibly hard to thread cables and outers through the frame due to cut outs to allow for more mud clearance but a more major issue I have just been alerted of when my bike went in for service is that the carbon around the bottom bracket is now an oval shape instead of circular. This meant that the pressfit BB was secure and had a small gap around it letting more water than normal in (from the ground or pressure washers) this led to the BB rusting quickly so needed replacing. The BB actually came out very easily which shouldnt be the case due to it being press fit. The bike has now been sent back to trek who are going to somehow fix the problem so will report back when it comes back
I have the same issue with my Boone. Bearings fall out when I remove the cranks, obviously not press fit and they are rusted due to water pooling up in the carbon shell. Thinking about drilling a hole in the bottom to release all the water. What did Trek say?
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Old 09-10-15, 01:55 AM   #21
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I took it into trek who had it for a couple days before telling me they would replace the frame which took a while as I got the bike when there were only 6 56cm frames in the country but haven't had any problems with the new one so it may be just the luck of the draw.

And just as a little word of advice, drilling holes in frames is probably counted as a warranty void

Last edited by b1k3rguy; 09-10-15 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 09-10-15, 11:56 AM   #22
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I took it into trek who had it for a couple days before telling me they would replace the frame which took a while as I got the bike when there were only 6 56cm frames in the country but haven't had any problems with the new one so it may be just the luck of the draw.

And just as a little word of advice, drilling holes in frames is probably counted as a warranty void
Thanks for the response. Yes, it would be a last resort of frustration if Trek will not address.

If you have this problem with the bottom bracket spacing, then you will likely have noticeable play when the cranks are attached with your new bearings. I have replaced my BB bearings 3 times in 15 months. That play in the cranks means the stock Trek chain watcher WILL become a chain prisoner. So you may want to remove the plastic Trek chain catcher if you are racing with your Boone and there is play in the BB.
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Old 09-10-15, 04:34 PM   #23
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I would suggest just taking it into trek and have them look at it. Since I got it back I have had zero problems and as I had my Boone built up with sram force CX1, I have never dropped a chain so don't have that problem
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