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View Poll Results: Which tools have you ACTUALLY needed for roadside repairs?

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  • philips head screwdriver

    32 35.56%
  • flat head screwdriver

    20 22.22%
  • 4, 5, or 6 mm hex key

    71 78.89%
  • 8 mm hex key

    19 21.11%
  • < 4 mm hex key

    12 13.33%
  • chain tool

    20 22.22%
  • spare tube(s)

    79 87.78%
  • glueless patches or patch kit

    44 48.89%
  • T25 or T30 torx wrench

    10 11.11%
  • spoke wrench

    20 22.22%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 26 to 50 of 54
  1. #26
    Senior Member karenashg's Avatar
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    Tweezers have saved a couple rides for me now, after I or a friend picked up a microscopic wire or shard of glass that would otherwise have been really difficult to extricate from a tire.

  2. #27
    Chaulky chaulky61's Avatar
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    What tools have I needed? Last week I needed a spoke wrench, 8 new sapim cx -rays, and a truing stand. Silly me had none of the above so I had to make the call of shame.
    "You were the crash" - W.S.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Dopolina View Post
    If you brake a gear cable or if something buggers up your rear der you can tighten the limit screws and fix the der in a single gear (as in a gear of your choice) to get home.

    The tool is usually part of a multi-tool so you most likely have it anyway.

    I can't believe that some people ride without a spare tube. Patching by the side of the road sucks. Swap in the spare tube and patch at home at your leisure.
    What about flame thrower attacks?

    Listen, lots of sh*t could go wrong, but if you look at this as a game of odds, the gambler in me-- and I'm a chalk player-- is getting down on the odds that neither I, nor anyone else, is gonna break a cable or bugger a mech in such a way that the limit screws are gonna make a wit of difference.

    That said, I see no reason for any rec rider to head out without a Ritchey CPR9 (or some lesser, heavier, bulkier tool as their sensibility allows) as a prophylactic measure. They're cheap and light and easy to carry. Start adding in chain breakers, crank pullers, and fire retardant Nomex suits, and the situation changes drastically.
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  4. #29
    don't misunderestimate me BoSoxYacht's Avatar
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    A couple of times, a helicopter has come in handy, but I usually borrow one.

  5. #30
    Mr. Dopolina Bob Dopolina's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
    What about flame thrower attacks?

    Listen, lots of sh*t could go wrong, but if you look at this as a game of odds, the gambler in me-- and I'm a chalk player-- is getting down on the odds that neither I, nor anyone else, is gonna break a cable or bugger a mech in such a way that the limit screws are gonna make a wit of difference.

    That said, I see no reason for any rec rider to head out without a Ritchey CPR9 (or some lesser, heavier, bulkier tool as their sensibility allows) as a prophylactic measure. They're cheap and light and easy to carry. Start adding in chain breakers, crank pullers, and fire retardant Nomex suits, and the situation changes drastically.
    You must not ride much.

    I have had spokes snap and get tangled in a rr der bending the hanger. I have had twigs jump up and do the same thing. I have crashed and messed up the rr der. I have had a link on a chain get bent and pull the rr der around causing a problem.

    Solution?

    Find a gear that works and lock it in.

    Downside?

    None. You have the tool anyway in a multi tool.
    BLOG of BOB: Old Guy Racer
    BDop Cycling Company Ltd.: bdopcycling.com, facebook

  6. #31
    Stand and Deliver FLvector's Avatar
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    I bring my cell phone.

  7. #32
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    I've had spokes break, chains break, deraileurs get knocked out of alignment, handlebars get bent around in a crash, and even had a left crank pop off. I've been able to address pretty much all these problems with my Crank Bros multi tool.

  8. #33
    Still can't climb
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    it's very simple. bring stuff for fixing a flat and bring a multitool, making sure it is the type that has a chain tool.

    easy.

    nuff said.

    no one is saying bring an independent chain tool.
    coasting, few quotes are worthy of him, and of those, even fewer printable in a family forum......quote 3alarmer

    No @coasting, you should stay 100% as you are right now, don't change a thing....quote Heathpack

  9. #34
    Senior Member dstrong's Avatar
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    7 years of riding with a multi-tool that has a chain tool and haven't needed it yet. Afraid to take it out now, as the next ride will be the one where I break my chain.

    2014 Specialized RoubaixOOOOOO 2003 Interloc ImpalaOOOOOO 2007 ParkPre Image C6 (RIP)


  10. #35
    Farmer tan f4rrest's Avatar
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    After breaking 2 chains in 1 month, I'm happy I had the Pedro's chain tool with me. It also doubles as a spoke wrench, 5mm hex key, and flat driver.

    I definitely carry more than a tube if heading into the mountains out of cell coverage.

  11. #36
    Senior Member yote223's Avatar
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    I carry a patch kit, Co2 inflator w/2 cylinders, 2 qiuck-links and a Park multi-tool.

    Park MTB-3 Rescue Tool - Modern Bike


    It's hard to soar with the Eagles when you're flying with Turkeys
    Charter Member of PSIP Coalition.

  12. #37
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    Just a Phillips screwdriver once.
    I only bring tools when setting up a bike so I can make adjustments.
    I guess it wouldn't hurt to bring a multi-tool once in a while.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by f4rrest View Post
    After breaking 2 chains in 1 month...
    That's highly unusual.

    Most riders don't break a single chain ever. I'm curious: what was going on with yours?
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  14. #39
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
    What about flame thrower attacks?

    Listen, lots of sh*t could go wrong, but if you look at this as a game of odds, the gambler in me-- and I'm a chalk player-- is getting down on the odds that neither I, nor anyone else, is gonna break a cable or bugger a mech in such a way that the limit screws are gonna make a wit of difference.

    That said, I see no reason for any rec rider to head out without a Ritchey CPR9 (or some lesser, heavier, bulkier tool as their sensibility allows) as a prophylactic measure. They're cheap and light and easy to carry. Start adding in chain breakers, crank pullers, and fire retardant Nomex suits, and the situation changes drastically.
    Lezyne 10 multi tool. 102 grams. $32 bucks. Fits in the smallest bag, and will take care of most everything, short of the flame thrower.




    Adding a chain tool to a mini tool takes up almost no additonal space,only adds 20 grams or so , and doubles a beer bottle opener.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
    Lezyne 10 multi tool. 102 grams. $32 bucks. Fits in the smallest bag, and will take care of most everything, short of the flame thrower.




    Adding a chain tool to a mini tool takes up almost no additonal space,only adds 20 grams or so , and doubles a beer bottle opener.
    20 grams is practically the entire mass of the Ritchey CPR 9 which has every tool you're actually likely to ever need, including the bottle opener, at 25 grams.

    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  16. #41
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
    20 grams is practically the entire mass of the Ritchey CPR 9 which has every tool you're actually likely to ever need, including the bottle opener, at 25 grams.

    Some of those ends look like they would not be useable in many pracitical situations. (for example the extension on the 2mm appears to be about 2mm.

    Also looks like a tube ripper in a saddle bag.

    But even assumming that the Ritchey is going to work well, the cost for adding a chain tool is 77 grams. (79 grams if you carry a quick link also) Pretty cheap easy insurance against hobby horsing home.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  17. #42
    Still can't climb
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    what the hell is a bottle opener doing on a multitool? i have never wanted to open a glass bottle on a ride.
    coasting, few quotes are worthy of him, and of those, even fewer printable in a family forum......quote 3alarmer

    No @coasting, you should stay 100% as you are right now, don't change a thing....quote Heathpack

  18. #43
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coasting View Post
    what the hell is a bottle opener doing on a multitool? i have never wanted to open a glass bottle on a ride.
    Parking lot after the ride.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  19. #44
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
    Parking lot after the ride.
    Bottle opener can be kept with the bottle in the car, no?

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlinextraligh View Post
    Some of those ends look like they would not be useable in many pracitical situations. (for example the extension on the 2mm appears to be about 2mm.

    Also looks like a tube ripper in a saddle bag.

    But even assumming that the Ritchey is going to work well, the cost for adding a chain tool is 77 grams. (79 grams if you carry a quick link also) Pretty cheap easy insurance against hobby horsing home.
    Tool works great; never have had a need it couldn't meet.

    It is pointy, and it is probably a good idea to make an effort to keep it from abrading tube.

    Agreed; it's a tiny amount of extra weight and bulk, and nothing to worry over one way or the other. As I said earlier, there's no reason not to carry some kind of multitool, whether you're a weight weenie or carefree hoarder.
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  21. #46
    Senior Member RPK79's Avatar
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    I like to have tire levers for fixing flats.

  22. #47
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Getting all weight weenie over a multi tool is hilarious... the smallest multi tool I carry is a Filzer E2 with an integrated chain tool and it weighs 145 grams and cost 12.00. It packs small and usually rides in a small seat bag with a CO2 inflator, a spare tube, and tyre levers.



    Depending on the bike I am using I might have to carry a 15mm or small adjustable wrench for wheel nuts and have several other multi tools of varying size and versatility.

    I also have an Alien II which is the swiss army knife of multi tools... you can fix almost anything with this but I use this for touring, commuting, and remote work.



    Most often these tools come in handy to help other cyclists who are having issues as I rarely have any mechanical issues of my own.

  23. #48
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    I've only ever used a tube and a CO2 cartridge/pump. I do carry a quick link, multi-tool that handles chains and patches, but that stuff is mainly for situations where I might run into female cyclist in distress...

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    Getting all weight weenie over a multi tool is hilarious... the smallest multi tool I carry is a Filzer E2 with an integrated chain tool and it weighs 145 grams and cost 12.00. It packs small and usually rides in a small seat bag with a CO2 inflator, a spare tube, and tyre levers.



    Depending on the bike I am using I might have to carry a 15mm or small adjustable wrench for wheel nuts and have several other multi tools of varying size and versatility.

    I also have an Alien II which is the swiss army knife of multi tools... you can fix almost anything with this but I use this for touring, commuting, and remote work.



    Most often these tools come in handy to help other cyclists who are having issues as [bold]I rarely have any mechanical issues of my own.[/bold]
    Right (referring to the bolded comment)...it's not being weight weenie, it's being pragmatic.
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  25. #50
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    All are viable options, but it depends on your riding style and where you ride.

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