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  1. #26
    Senior Member bruce19's Avatar
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    In 1967 playing football in college......5'10" & 185 lbs.
    In 1969 after Basic Training........................178 lbs.
    Today...........................................5'9" & 182 lbs.

    But, thanks to this thread, I don't know where I fit. Clyde? UnClyde? Normal? (No not normal) I am so confused

  2. #27
    Yogi on Wheels schiiism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DXchulo View Post
    I'm sure people with DMD, Type I Diabetes, etc. would disagree with that.

    Also, it's typical fat-ass thinking to overestimate the role of genetics as opposed to personal responsibility. I ride over 10,000 miles per year and eat as clean as I can (nobody's perfect). I hear all the time how lucky I am to have "fast metabolism" or some BS like that. Both of my parents are fat. I'd be fat too if I didn't ride much and ate whatever I wanted.
    You're preaching to the choir, several members of my family have died of both type I and II diabetes. I started biking at around 200 lbs and 28% body fat--through cycling and changing my eating habits, I'm now 145 at a solid 15% BF. I get the same BS about a fast metabolism. I've found that most people resort to that excuse in labeling others to escape their own responsibility to get in shape. That being said, having a genetic predisposition is exacerbated by poor lifestyle choices.

    My quip about genetics was referring to people who are very thin or short, causing them to have a low weight and be "un-clydesdales." Eating disorders aside, most featherweights are not undernourished or unhealthy from lifestyle choices. The human condition and the way civilization has changed since agriculture and wonderful inventions like high fructose corn syrup, fried Twinkies, and American portion sizes have made obesity a frighteningly widespread health hazard in first world countries. You're right that you'd be fat too if you made those choices, which is all the more reason that people benefit from support communities like the Clyde forum for encouragement to make those positive changes.

  3. #28
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    If a Un-Clyde forums is created, should it be called the Pony?

  4. #29
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Yorker View Post
    Take frames, for example. If I'm shopping a new frame for randonneuring, should I be looking at the same tubing as the rest of us?
    Finding lightweight quality equipment has never been easier.
    Finding a light lively frameset with the clearance for reasonably wide tires, mudguards and a light load not so much in the average LBS.

    The British do speak Audax and offer a range of steel, aluminum and CF framesets designed to exactly that spec.

    A custom Mercian 853, a Thorn or a CF Ribble would work for me, and I am not a big guy.
    I'm sure you have Google, try a search.

    That being said it took no great research to build up both my wet weather Rando-ish build & my dry day distance bikes.

    -Bandera
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  5. #30
    djb
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    being light, I once had an interesting experience with a heavy set owner of a bike store just couldnt get his head around the tire pressures I have run for years and years with no issues with 28s, including 28s for loaded touring.
    Just as heavy riders have to be aware of wheel limitations and such, being lighter allows you to use much lower tire pressures that makes a real difference in comfort and how the bike corners as well--but for someone who is 40, 60, 80lbs more than me, its pretty common to find that they think you are nuts if you mention the pressures you use.

  6. #31
    Senior Member shoota's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    being light, I once had an interesting experience with a heavy set owner of a bike store just couldnt get his head around the tire pressures I have run for years and years with no issues with 28s, including 28s for loaded touring.
    Just as heavy riders have to be aware of wheel limitations and such, being lighter allows you to use much lower tire pressures that makes a real difference in comfort and how the bike corners as well--but for someone who is 40, 60, 80lbs more than me, its pretty common to find that they think you are nuts if you mention the pressures you use.
    I'll bite, what pressure do you use?
    2005 Cannondale six13 10s SRAM

  7. #32
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seypat View Post
    A tad bit harsh there DX. Genetics and body type play a bigger part in overall weight than you think. It certainly is the determining factors in which athletic endeavours a person excels at. That's why there are GC contenders, domestiques, sprinters and track cyclists. A person can float between the different types but the body must transform in order to do it.

    I'm amazed at some of the weight roller coaster rides that I see on these weight threads. I will admit that the wife and I chuckle at how light some people are in these threads. Congratulations to you people who can get it back down after a huge gain. Heck, getting off 10lbs is a struggle.

    I myself:

    Started high school at 5'2" 120lbs. Good run and jump athlete. Varsity basketball, baseball, and track for 4 years. Scoliosis, so no football.
    Graduated high school at 5'8.25" 168lbs. 4.6 40 and a vertical jump at 40+ inches. (Dunker at 5'8)
    Played DII college basketball and graduated college at around 175lbs.
    Next 5-7 years basketball 7 days a week, weight lifting, etc. still around 178.
    Got married at 188lbs. Had kids. Still playing, lifting, went to 215 a couple of ways. As a chubby and as a weight lifter.
    Got back to 200lbs. At 45 I developed plantar fasciitis and had to leave the court. So I took up cycling. Usually average a century a month from April to October. Still 200.
    The wife is a runner so I took that up as well last year. Got to 195lbs last year after an unsupported century in June. This year I have run a number of running events including a half marathon and an Olympic Duathlon at the start of this month. I turned 49 this year. Was at 200.
    Signed up for the Richmond Marathon and its training team that started in May. I have been running 15-20 miles a week in addition to the other stuff. No more weight lifting. All I do is run, bike and swim. Whatever fat I had is changing into muscle. This morning I weighed 205lbs before breakfast. I have went down a waist size to a 34. In college, I wore 33s. I still have to wear size 38 cycling shorts because of my quads and upper legs. Most people think I weigh around 170lbs.

    DX, do not underestimate the role genetics play in overall weight. If a person lives a healthy lifestyle they still might tip the scales at a bigger weight.

    By the way, I still suck on hills and distance running. I always will. But I can still run the 40 in under 5 seconds and jump pretty high. That's what life dealt me.
    All I was talking about was being fat versus not being fat. I don't give two ****s about body weight. It's all about body fat percentage to me. The average person can get to a healthy percentage by exercising and eating a healthy diet. However, the average fat person will put the blame on something else.

    It's a common thing in other aspects of life, too. People are quick to blame someone/something else instead of taking personal responsibility. I think a lot of rich people go through the same thing. People just assume that they got all their money through "luck," which is their version of some sort of magical fast metabolism.
    centuryperweek.blogspot.com

  8. #33
    Not actually Tmonk TMonk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Goes Boing View Post
    That sounds pretty similar to me......

    I was 5'10 125lbs when I started highschool
    I was 5'10 145lbs when I started college
    I was 5'10 155lbs when I graduated
    I was 5'10 155-160lbs from 25-29
    same here.

    In college I rode a lot more, trained as a road racer. I had one week over winter break when I rode for 18hrs. I was 145 lbs.

    Now I ride 6-10hrs a week, slightly more over the winter, and train for crit racing and track. I'm 155-160lbs. To my credit, it's not all fat, I lift 2x/week also (1x upper/abs, 1x lower/abs).
    "Your beauty is an aeroplane;
    so high, my heart cannot bear the strain." -A.C. Jobim, Triste

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DXchulo View Post
    All I was talking about was being fat versus not being fat. I don't give two ****s about body weight. It's all about body fat percentage to me. The average person can get to a healthy percentage by exercising and eating a healthy diet. However, the average fat person will put the blame on something else.

    It's a common thing in other aspects of life, too. People are quick to blame someone/something else instead of taking personal responsibility. I think a lot of rich people go through the same thing. People just assume that they got all their money through "luck," which is their version of some sort of magical fast metabolism.
    Glad you cleared that up!

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesRL View Post
    Add thirty years, marriage to someone who didn't cycle because of her knees, a few kids, and whamo, I'm a Clyde. I did balloon up to 260, I'm now 220, and I hope to get below 200.

    But be careful about assumptions. My 20 year old son is skinnier than me, but he can't keep up on the bike.
    Nice job on the weight loss

    I have had my butt handed to me by a few heavier riders in the past (6'2 170 ish +/-)

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Team Sarcasm View Post
    Nice job on the weight loss

    I have had my butt handed to me by a few heavier riders in the past (6'2 170 ish +/-)

    Thanks, I still have 20 to go. Big lifestyle changes, taking 8 flights of stairs every morning at work.

    I don't know that I can hand anyone's butt to them except my son, and I think thats only because I've been a competitive athlete and I know when I have more in tank and when I'm at my limit.

    When I was 170, and young, I could fly past most riders on the flats, but hills weren't easy. I started training in High Park in Toronto, after watching races held there by Bloor cycle, which included a steep but short hill.

  12. #37
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by shoota View Post
    I'll bite, what pressure do you use?
    Tricky cuz so much of my riding is commuting so with 1 or 2 panniers with a range of weight, but the lightest the bike will ever be is 1water bottle, some tools and spare tube, bike is probably high 20s, let's say 28. Add mentioned stuff and its probably a 30lb bike , me 140 and I routinely run the 28 slicks at 95r 90fr and down to 90r-85f sometimes when bike is at its lightest and I've never had problems, just very good traction and mid corner leaned over suspension from tires not being harder. I suspect too that the pressures get a bit lower when I don't check.
    I toured with 28 slicks and about 40lbs of stuff at 100psi a lot, never any issues, so with 40lbs less on a bike I have no qualms going 10-15 less.
    I do make a real effort to ride "light" always and do my best always not to hit potholes seated, so as to unload the bike and let it move around as much as possible.

  13. #38
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    ^ I'm the OP, thanks for sharing that. Things like tire pressure are exactly the sort of stuff I was wondering about.

    Reading these replies, I'm surprised the conversation is so much about weight loss, genetics, being fat, diabetes, weight gain since college (the sorta things I'd expect to find in the Clydesdale forum) and not about useful pointers for lighter riders. Perhaps it's because there are so few of us; 9 out of 10 American males of my height (66.5") and age (61) weigh more than I do (138). Or maybe it's because there simply aren't that many tips that apply to light riders only.

    But my original intent was simply to spark a discussion about wheels, tires, frame materials, etc. for lighter riders – not a debate about lifestyle!
    Last edited by New Yorker; 06-26-14 at 04:16 PM.

  14. #39
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Yorker View Post
    But my original intent was simply to spark a discussion about wheels, tires, frame materials, etc. for lighter riders – not a debate about lifestyle!
    High quality lightweight equipment is everywhere, CF frames & low spoke count CF wheels abound. Some have to add weights to meet the UCI minimum. If Contador can't break it neither can you, copy his kit & ready to go for a $$$$$ or so.

    If your requirements include clearance for reasonably wide tires, mudguards, a dyno-hub lighting system and enough carrying capacity for a self supported 1200KM Brevet with the lightest possible weight that can be done also.

    Being a lightweight rider is a bit of a no-brainer for kit, go as light as you can afford. Modern stuff is exceptionally reliable and overbuilt for light riders.

    PS
    Give up smoking.

    -Bandera
    Last edited by Bandera; 06-26-14 at 04:55 PM.
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  15. #40
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Yorker View Post
    ^ I'm the OP, thanks for sharing that. Things like tire pressure are exactly the sort of stuff I was wondering about.

    Reading these replies, I'm surprised the conversation is so much about weight loss, genetics, being fat, diabetes, weight gain since college (the sorta things I'd expect to find in the Clydesdale forum) and not about useful pointers for lighter riders. Perhaps it's because there are so few of us; 9 out of 10 American males of my height (66.5") and age (61) weigh more than I do (138). Or maybe it's because there simply aren't that many tips that apply to light riders only.

    But my original intent was simply to spark a discussion about wheels, tires, frame materials, etc. for lighter riders – not a debate about lifestyle!
    You did not do a very good job of communicating your intent in your OP. It read more like a wish for a new sub-forum. your options are much broader due to your size than clydes.

    DXchulo you are still painting with an awful broad brush. There are plenty of fat people that have taken owenership for their behavior that resulted in their weight.


    Mark

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    5'4" here at 120lbs.

    lol the plus side for us is we get lighter bikes... erm sort of

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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    Tricky cuz so much of my riding is commuting so with 1 or 2 panniers with a range of weight, but the lightest the bike will ever be is 1water bottle, some tools and spare tube, bike is probably high 20s, let's say 28. Add mentioned stuff and its probably a 30lb bike , me 140 and I routinely run the 28 slicks at 95r 90fr and down to 90r-85f sometimes when bike is at its lightest and I've never had problems, just very good traction and mid corner leaned over suspension from tires not being harder. I suspect too that the pressures get a bit lower when I don't check.
    I toured with 28 slicks and about 40lbs of stuff at 100psi a lot, never any issues, so with 40lbs less on a bike I have no qualms going 10-15 less.
    I do make a real effort to ride "light" always and do my best always not to hit potholes seated, so as to unload the bike and let it move around as much as possible.
    That actually sounds a bit high to me. I'm the same weight with 28's on my commuter and I keep it around 70 psi (only pump up at the start of the week).
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  18. #43
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gatorfreak View Post
    That actually sounds a bit high to me. I'm the same weight with 28's on my commuter and I keep it around 70 psi (only pump up at the start of the week).
    lots of variables, plus also what someone may prefer with tire "feel". Different tires themselves have different "feel" at the same pressure. The 28s I'm using now are Ultra Gatorskins, I dont think I've ever run them that low (70) I think I would find them moving around a bit too much in hard cornering, but I could be wrong. I tend to floor pump them up one day, usually a bit more at the back if I know I'll be carrying loads of stuff in two panniers, and then they gradually go down as the week goes along--and like I said, I suspect they go further down than I realize sometimes.

    it is rather significant how different pressures make the bike ride differently, and going down too low for me doesnt give me confidence with the front end in hard fast cornering, but then again, too high and thats a negative too in hard cornering, especially if there are bumps in mid corner and such. The bike really gets unsettled more with higher pressures, but its always a tradeofff and finding a good compromise inbetween (and not getting snake bite punctures)

  19. #44
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    DXchulo you are still painting with an awful broad brush. There are plenty of fat people that have taken owenership for their behavior that resulted in their weight.
    1. I never said ALL.

    2. Most don't.
    centuryperweek.blogspot.com

  20. #45
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    5'6" and about 135-140lbs(haven't weighed my self lately). I like riding with 100psi on my 23c's.

  21. #46
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by silkroad View Post
    5'6" and about 135-140lbs(haven't weighed my self lately). I like riding with 100psi on my 23c's.
    this touches on even lighter riders and tire pressures. This whole topic came up with me last year specifically because my wife got her first drop bar bike, running 25s, and in the interest of wanting her to enjoy the bike and to encourage more riding without wrist and neck issues she'd had in the past, it was very much in my interest to run the 25s at lower pressures to make the ride more comfortable.

    If she was more comfortable, she'd ride more, if she rides more, she'd toughen up her core, her legs etc etc etc, basically a win win. I certainly found that not running 25s at 110 or 120 as often recommended helped a lot, and using about 95 works fine and allows a bit of leeway for when she never bothers to check tire pressures (she has no interest).

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    I saw this article by Jan Heine in Bicycle Quarterly:
    http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf

    Apparently most of us have our tire pressures way high. According to this article, tire manufacturers consider a 15% wheel drop optimal. Following this chart, the 25's on my Trek should be 55F / 90R (I'm 138 lbs). Crazy, no? Well I tried it and wow, it rides fine, and is more comfortable. (I was skeptical, too; try it and you may be pleasantly surprised.)

  23. #48
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Yorker View Post
    55F
    Typo? 85F?

    85F/90R on the 28s on my Rando-ish build at 160lb rider weight.

    -Bandera
    '74 Raleigh International - '77 Trek TX900FG - '92 Vitus 979 - '10 Merckx EMX-3- '11 Soma Stanyan

  24. #49
    rugged individualist wphamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
    Typo? 85F?

    85F/90R on the 28s on my Rando-ish build at 160lb rider weight.

    -Bandera
    No typo, the chart really recommends about that on the front for someone weighing 138 and a normal road bike.

    There are some assumptions about weight distribution. such as 40% and 60% on front and back, which suggests that the pressure in the rear should be 50% higher than the pressure in front. Or the front one third lower, whichever way you want to look at it. I don't do that either (tho I run way lower pressure than is normally stated on this forum), but I think I'll weigh the front and back loaded tonight and try the chart pressures just to see.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
    Typo? 85F?

    85F/90R on the 28s on my Rando-ish build at 160lb rider weight.

    -Bandera
    Not a typo! Like you, I thought there must be some mistake, but no.
    I'm running Grand Bois Extra Leger 42s on my other bike, a Boulder Allroad 650B. Sidewall of tire says PSI should be between 55-75 PSI. Chart says I should be running 35F / 40R. Tried it on a 45 mile ride last Sunday andů no problem. Very comfortable.

    Here's Heine's answer to my question about running too low tire pressures:
    The minimum inflation values are pretty arbitrary. I run my Hetres at 35-45 psi... For the Compass tires, we don't list minimum inflation values, because they are too confusing.

    The maximum inflation really is the maximum safe pressure - don't exceed it!

    For the minimum, you can go lower. Once the tire really starts to deflect a lot and washes out in corners, you are too low. Also, the casing threads will start to break if you run pressures that are too low. You'll see it as a pattern in the sidewall. If just one thread is broken (which usually happens), the tire still is fine to ride... But this happens at ridiculously low pressures. The one time to pay attention is you have a flat. Don't ride it until you roll on the rim, otherwise, you'll break a few threads in the casing.

    Jan Heine
    Compass Bicycles Ltd.
    Compass Bicycles

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