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  1. #1
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    Newbie questions, and help understanding the road bike industry in 2015!

    A little bit about me. I live in Castle Rock Colorado. I am 35 years old 6'3 and just under 300 pounds. I am an ex football and baseball player. I have very flat feet and started biking 2 summers ago because running etc caused too much hip and feet pain.

    I bought a Specialized Secteur Sport Disc - Fun!: http://youtu.be/CejJjcxjkrQ for my first bike, and to be honest I did not do much research. At the time I bought the bike I had no idea if I would even like road biking. All I knew was I wanted to try road biking because I heard it was awesome for those who wanted to lose weight with a non impact sport, which is what I needed. I also had been watching this gentleman's videos on YouTube and watched videos like this CYCLING FOR WEIGHT LOSS OR RUNNING FOR WEIGHT LOSS? Which one is better?: http://youtu.be/QWY63gcW7NQ and this CYCLING TIPS : DURIANRIDER'S TOP 10 CYCLING TIPS! #159 : http://youtu.be/BlbveG2Qrhg.

    So after watching these videos I decided to give road biking a try. I went to the closest large bike shop to my house and with little research and talking to the sales guy bought the Specialized Secture sport disc. I thought it was a good idea because the sales guy told me I could ride the bike on dirt / gravel roads as well as paved roads. He also said I could put wide tires on the bike if I wanted to because of the disc brakes. Not knowing a thing about bikes, the flexibility of being able to ride pavement and gravel sold me, so I bought the bike. The price seemed right as well at $1,200.

    I started riding that bike everyday. I wore gym shorts and tennis shoes. I did not know any better. When my back side started to get raw etc as the miles increased I began doing research and soon learned why the bikers I always saw riding around Colorado wore the tight shorts. I found a performance bike near my house and bought the cheapest pair of bike shorts they had. Even though I felt like a fool being almost 300 pounds wearing these tight shorts. I soon got over the public embarrassment because my backside felt so much better. A bike jersey with zipper and back pockets followed. The miles increased from 5 to 10 to 15 to 20 to 30. The weight started falling off. From about June 10th 2013 to October 1st 2013 I had gotten down to 220 and felt amazing. I changed my diet but nothing too crazy. I found a cycling club in my town and rode with them once a week that summer. First time I rode with them I showed up in tennis shoes bike shorts and a cotton tee shirt. Everyone else had matching kits clipless shoes and pedals and were riding Tarmacs, venges, madones, TCR's, propels, etc, one guy asked me why I had a cyclocross bike? I told him that the guy at the bike store told me the Secture was not a cyclocross bike, but was a road bike with disc brakes. Luckily there were some nice guys who made me feel comfortable and over the next few weeks taught me how to ride in a group and stayed back with me when the guys on the Venge's left me in the dust. I was grateful that they took the time to teach me.

    I became hooked and looked forward to riding my bike everyday. I knew my next step was to get clipless pedals so I started saving. The snow came before I could get the clipless pedals. I decided to hold off on the clipless pedals and get a bike trainer from performance bike. I road the trainer for about a week and absolutely hated it. I stopped riding it and the snow kept coming. I started eating poorly again and without the daily exercise I started to put back on the pounds, especially over the holidays. I know find my self here on February 17th 2015 weighing just under 300 pounds and very unhappy. I took my trainer back to performance bike and traded it in for rollers. I am in the process of building these. Brian Stoner's Freeform Rollers: http://youtu.be/MY5UAuqPlss . Diy free motion rollers. I enjoy the rollers much more and am committed to ridding them everyday until the snow melts. I also bought my first pair of clipless shoes and pedals. I am committed to ride everyday when the weather is nice. My long term goal is to complete a century ride here in the Colorado mountains before the snow falls again in November 2015, and also get down to 200 pounds and stay at that weight.

    Now that I have shared my background. I come to you with a question and advice?

    I know I want to upgrade my Specialized Secture sport disc that has Sora 9 speed to a much better bike. I come to you with some honest questions and want you to know I will continue to ride my Secture Sport disc until I have done all my research and am then ready to purchase my next bike. My budget will be $3,000 to $4,000 and am willing to take my time and listen to all of you and to whoever else will counsel me. I am a high school dean so $3 to $4,000 is a lot of money especially because I have 4 kids under 11 years of age. So, I have to make sure I do my research and get the best next bike for me at that price range.

    Here are a few things I know, or think I know that I want in my next bike.
    1. I want my next bike to have hydraulic disc brakes.

    2. I want my next bike to have through axles. My research tells me through axles are superior on disc brake bikes. "Specialized’s Mark Cote said recently, “There’s the technology there to start building thru axle road and ‘cross bikes. We believe in discs and thru axles go hand in hand. It’s all part of tuning the ride and thru axles give us even more ability to do so.”
    Read more at Thru the looking glass of Whisky: Thru axles are coming to road, ?cross forks - VeloNews.com
    My research tells me that Trek, Colongo, Focus and foundry have 2015 disc brake bikes with thru axles but Specialized, Giant and Cannondale do not? This confuses me completely!


    3. I recently read that Shamano has developed a flat mount system for how disc brakes will mount to road bike frames Shimano Unveils Flat Mount Standard for Road Disc Brakes - Cyclocross Magazine - Cyclocross News, Races, Bikes, Photos, Videos . From what I understand road bikes that have disc brakes that were designed before 2016 connect the disc brake to the frame using a post mount system. From my understanding post mount two bolt mounts that jut out from the frame as commonly used on mountain bikes. This the way mountain bikes and cyclocross bikes mount their disc brakes to their bike frames. I don't understand why bike companies would sell a road disc brake bike with a frame using a two bolt mount that juts out from the frame that was developed for mountain bikes and cyclocross bikes. If shamano has developed this flat mount standard for road bikes and the advantages are cleaner, integrated construction with the frame (with no visible mounting bolts). and a more direct connection to the frame and better alignment as it eliminates the need for stacking adapters, and better tool access. Why would I spend $3 to $4 grand on a bike now that does not have flat mounts, especially if Shimano worked with several large bike companies to develop the flat mount standard? Seems to me they are saying the flat mount standard is superior to a two bolt post mount system that was designed for mountain bikes not road bikes. I would hate to buy a disc brake road bike in 2015 that does not have the flat mount standard only to learn the 2016 models have the flat mount standard. Again, $3 to $4 grand is a lot to spend on a bike now if the standard is being developed now by the largest companies in the industry which will set the standard for road bikes in the very near future. There are already bikes coming out in 2015 that have the flat mount standard. I have to say right now Giant defy is at the top of my list, however their 2015 offerings do not have through axles or the flat mount standard. Is there any way to know if Giant will offer a 2016 defy with flat mounts and through axels?

    4. I would like my next bike to be carbon.


    Thank you so much for reading this and I would appreciate any feedback you could give me in helping me choose my next bike and helping me reach my goals.

  2. #2
    L-I-V-I-N dtrain's Avatar
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    Forgive me, but...



    ...is a summary available?
    "The older you do get, the more rules they're gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin', man, L-I-V-I-N." - Wooderson

    '14 carbon Synapse - '12 CAAD 10 5 - '99 Gary Fisher Big Sur

  3. #3
    Senior Member roadwarrior's Avatar
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    I'll tackle one piece....at your current weight, there will be no warranty on a carbon bike. It varies some, but the cutoff for most is 230 pounds. If you crack the frame at just under 300 pounds, no warranty.

    In opinion you are overthinking this. Just buy a road bike that fits and ride. Defy is a more relaxed ride, TCR more laid out. Stick to bike like the Defy, Synapse, etc...
    Last edited by roadwarrior; 02-18-15 at 01:43 PM.
    I AM IN THE BIKE BUSINESS!!!
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  4. #4
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    It's your choice, but I don't quite see why you want to spend $4K on a road bike and are committed to hydraulic disk brakes.

    A good road bike with say 105 level components and regular brakes can be had for $2500ish and may be ideal for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by RUOkie View Post
    never underestimate the idiocy of BF.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    It's your choice, but I don't quite see why you want to spend $4K on a road bike and are committed to hydraulic disk brakes.

    A good road bike with say 105 level components and regular brakes can be had for $2500ish and may be ideal for you.
    Good advice. Rim brakes work fine (better in many cases) and offer many more options. Road bike discs are still esoteric and the standards are still evolving. Also, IMO there's simply no practical reason for you to spend $3K-$4K, especially since it sounds like it will be a stretch. The benefit vs a $2K or $2.5K bike will be minimal to non-existant for you. I'd get a quality alloy frame with 105 and good strong wheels. Allez superweld, CAAD/Synapse, Jamis Icon etc.

  7. #7
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    I'm not really one for keeping up with the latest and greatest cycling stuff because it just gets expensive. So... IMHO you are focusing on the wrong things. Disk brakes, rim brakes, hydraulic disks... who cares. Through axles? Never even heard of the term. Mounting? Meh. Carbon? Well, I like my carbon bike so I'll go with you on that one.

    The MOST important thing is to find a bike that you like and suits your purposes and fits you well. Aluminum, Carbon, rim brakes... all subordinate.

    The second most important thing is to find a bike you like enough to want to ride it every day.

    Your secteur is basically an aluminum framed similar-to-a-Roubaix road "endurance" bike. "endurance" is code for a tall head tubed bike that appeals to less flexible older folk (among plenty of other subsets of humanity), so if you enjoy the way your current bike fits and rides, you may want to consider a Specialized Roubaix, Trek Domane, Giant Defy, BMC GF series et. al. If you want something that looks racier and you're physique can handle it, Tarmac, Emonda, TCR etc. are more that style.

    I mean to tell you, you can get really lost in all the minutia - do you want a FACT carbon 8r or do you need 10r? Can you even tell the difference? Would it matter? If you believe 10r is better than 8r, perhaps you need 11r on an S-Works frame?

    If you are on a budget and you are patient (most of us seem to be the first and not the second) then bike shops tend to unload their "new old stock" bikes at the end of the model year and you can get some pretty good deals on last year's "latest and greatest". I've seen Tarmacs with 105 go for $1600 or so, same for Cannondale Supersix with 105. Those are two eminently effective cycling machines and that leaves you $2500 to pay for sitters so you can go enjoy your bike. Competitive cyclist also seems to like to unload old model bikes

    At the end of the day, it's your money and you get to choose how to spend it but don't lose sight of the fact that it's the engine and not the bike that takes you up those mountains.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    I'm not really one for keeping up with the latest and greatest cycling stuff because it just gets expensive. So... IMHO you are focusing on the wrong things. Disk brakes, rim brakes, hydraulic disks... who cares. Through axles? Never even heard of the term. Mounting? Meh. Carbon? Well, I like my carbon bike so I'll go with you on that one.

    The MOST important thing is to find a bike that you like and suits your purposes and fits you well. Aluminum, Carbon, rim brakes... all subordinate.

    The second most important thing is to find a bike you like enough to want to ride it every day.

    Your secteur is basically an aluminum framed similar-to-a-Roubaix road "endurance" bike. "endurance" is code for a tall head tubed bike that appeals to less flexible older folk (among plenty of other subsets of humanity), so if you enjoy the way your current bike fits and rides, you may want to consider a Specialized Roubaix, Trek Domane, Giant Defy, BMC GF series et. al. If you want something that looks racier and you're physique can handle it, Tarmac, Emonda, TCR etc. are more that style.

    I mean to tell you, you can get really lost in all the minutia - do you want a FACT carbon 8r or do you need 10r? Can you even tell the difference? Would it matter? If you believe 10r is better than 8r, perhaps you need 11r on an S-Works frame?

    If you are on a budget and you are patient (most of us seem to be the first and not the second) then bike shops tend to unload their "new old stock" bikes at the end of the model year and you can get some pretty good deals on last year's "latest and greatest". I've seen Tarmacs with 105 go for $1600 or so, same for Cannondale Supersix with 105. Those are two eminently effective cycling machines and that leaves you $2500 to pay for sitters so you can go enjoy your bike. Competitive cyclist also seems to like to unload old model bikes

    At the end of the day, it's your money and you get to choose how to spend it but don't lose sight of the fact that it's the engine and not the bike that takes you up those mountains.

    I would like Hydraulic disc brakes because I live in Colorado and ride in the rain and will be descending long steep grades. From my research I learned that disc brakes are the future of road bikes. Giant as put disc brakes on all their 2015 Defy models. I currently have mechanical disc brakes on the Secuture Sport disc, and would like to upgrade to hydraulics on the next bike. Thru axles provide stability when paired with disc brakes. As a heavier guy I am more about stability over the quickness of a tire change that quick release would bring. I care more about performance and safety. I can't help believe that thru-axles bring that or else Trek would not have designed their Domane discs with thru axles???

  9. #9
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Just be aware that marketing claims by the bicycling industry don't always relate to real world noticeable improvements. Happy bike shopping though.

  10. #10
    blah blah blah milkbaby's Avatar
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    While I like having extra bikes to ride in case one of them is down for mechanical reasons or having a rain bike that I'm not as worried about, it sounds like money is tight for you. Is there something you don't like about your current bike that is causing you to ride it less? If you're still enjoying it and enjoying the rides, a second bike might be a luxury you would consider holding off on for now especially with your finances and your family to take care of.

    On the other hand, sometimes having a new bike encourages a rider to ride more, and that is a positive benefit. Personally, I really enjoy riding with friends and the group rides are very motivating for me. I also enjoy just riding along solo, but it's very motivating to know that your friends are expecting you to show up to the ride, and it's a lot of fun.

  11. #11
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Disk brakes are so not the future of road bikes.

    Are you really going to be going down the mountains in the rain??
    Quote Originally Posted by RUOkie View Post
    never underestimate the idiocy of BF.

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    The whole disc thing is still evolving. As far as mounting, thru axles vs skewers and all that, I don't think there will be an industry standard until the professional racing teams are forced to adapt to discs. And it will be forced because the racers aren't begging for it. Unless you see a bike that has everything you want now, you may want to wait awhile. Nobody here is going to have a clue what's going to come out in '16. Keep an eye on sites like Pez Cycling and Cycling News in the tech sections.
    Quote Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
    I have an audience. They are just smarter than you. I am the voice of the industry.

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    I ride in Colorado in the mountains in the summer and it can rain almost every afternoon. If I am out on a long bike ride would I not be forced to ride in the rain?

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    Quote Originally Posted by milkbaby View Post
    While I like having extra bikes to ride in case one of them is down for mechanical reasons or having a rain bike that I'm not as worried about, it sounds like money is tight for you. Is there something you don't like about your current bike that is causing you to ride it less? If you're still enjoying it and enjoying the rides, a second bike might be a luxury you would consider holding off on for now especially with your finances and your family to take care of.

    On the other hand, sometimes having a new bike encourages a rider to ride more, and that is a positive benefit. Personally, I really enjoy riding with friends and the group rides are very motivating for me. I also enjoy just riding along solo, but it's very motivating to know that your friends are expecting you to show up to the ride, and it's a lot of fun.

    I hate the SORA 9 speed that is on the bike. I would like at least 105 11 speed on my bike. I also believe there are more comfortable materials out there as well. Carbon being one of them. I like the disc brakes on my current bike but they are Mechanical. I do not see disc brakes going away on road bikes. Look at Giant all of there Defy bikes have disc brakes. Specialized even has a venge or tarmac with disc brakes, and from everything I read the UCI will allow disc brakes in the 2016 pro races.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    Disk brakes are so not the future of road bikes.

    Are you really going to be going down the mountains in the rain??
    So this is not true? UCI-approved road bike disc brakes coming in 2016, says WFSGI's bike man | road.cc

  16. #16
    L-I-V-I-N dtrain's Avatar
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    So what's the request here? Name some bikes that check all your boxes, or...?
    "The older you do get, the more rules they're gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin', man, L-I-V-I-N." - Wooderson

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    First, you're kinda in the wrong forum. The Clydesdale forum gets these kind of questions all the time. You will be able to talk to folks your size and larger who have many of the same goals as you do.

    Second, while manufacturers do publish weight limits for their bikes, these weight limits are more about stopping distances than frame strength. In fact, at your size, wheels will be much more of an issue. You will likely kill just about any stock wheel, including the wheels on your current Secture.

    Third, I agree that disc brakes are in flux and I also agree with you about through axles. The reason that Specialized doesn't have them on their road disc bikes is that none of those bikes have been re-designed in a year or two (IMHO). I expect the "Roubaix SL5" (when/if it happens) to have through axels. Personally I am very interested in a recent patent application from Specialized that involves a very interesting change to their front fork (likely for the Roubaix, which is the carbon version of your bike) and the disc version showed a through axle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dtrain View Post
    So what's the request here? Name some bikes that check all your boxes, or...?
    I guess the request is for a road bike that thru-axles and Shimano's flat mount standard. Trek Domane has thru-axles but not the flat mount standard. Their discs are mounted to the frame using the post mount mountain bike style mount. It does not make any sense to me to buy a road bike with disc brakes if the discs are mounted using a mountain bike / cycle cross standard. Road bikes should have a mounting system that is less cumbersome and designed specifically for a road bike??????? Again I am a newbie and could be totally off base?

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    The flat mount option is still very new. You should not let this detail stop you from choosing a bike. It could be years until it is widespread. It may even never be fully adopted. If you are so hung up on miner aesthetic things like this then you should buy a road bike with calipers for the 'cleaner look'. Disc brakes arn't exactly pretty.

    Test ride some bikes with through axles vs qr's. Thats the only way you will know what is superior or not. You probably wont notice much or any difference.
    Last edited by trailflow1; 02-18-15 at 05:28 PM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member GuitarBob's Avatar
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    My two cents. Ride your current bike for another season -- it is a solid bike.

    Then make a deal with yourself. When you hit 225 (or whatever you see as a challenging goal), you get yourself that new bike. If you can do that before November, you get to ride the new bike during that century.

    That gives you a bunch of months to see if you're going to hang with it and to sort out of exactly what you want in a new bike, disc brakes or otherwise.

  21. #21
    In the wind mercator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cntcasey View Post
    I guess the request is for a road bike that thru-axles and Shimano's flat mount standard. Trek Domane has thru-axles but not the flat mount standard. Their discs are mounted to the frame using the post mount mountain bike style mount. It does not make any sense to me to buy a road bike with disc brakes if the discs are mounted using a mountain bike / cycle cross standard. Road bikes should have a mounting system that is less cumbersome and designed specifically for a road bike??????? Again I am a newbie and could be totally off base?
    You are running up against a common issue of evolving bike (or actually any) technology. If you spec the latest, greatest thing, you will often get something that only appears for a couple of years before it is 'improved'. Right now, you will find a few bikes with disc brakes, most of them using cable actuation, mtb mounting systems, and standard dropouts. In a few years this will change.

    A similar transition is occurring with electronic groupsets - quite a few folks are riding around with batteries hanging out of their frames - the perils of being early adopters I guess.

    You can buy now and be on the bleeding edge, wait until a standard emerges and buy that, or buy the current standard, which is still dual caliper rim brakes.

  22. #22
    ka maté ka maté ka ora pdedes's Avatar
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    if you absolutely must buy a bike, get a caliper braked 105 or sram force22 equipped bike. make sure the frame and fork have clearance for 28mm rubber minimum. the standard is going to take 5 years to develop.
    By the time you're experienced enough to get something germane out of a test ride, you won't need a test ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdedes View Post
    if you absolutely must buy a bike, get a caliper braked 105 or sram force22 equipped bike. make sure the frame and fork have clearance for 28mm rubber minimum. the standard is going to take 5 years to develop.
    The standard will take 5 years to develop?

    This Scott bike is A 2015 model and has the flat mount?

    First look: Scott's 2015 Solace gets disc brakes - VeloNews.com

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    maybe its not such a bad idea for him to get a bike with disk brakes, the wheel will have more spokes to hold hes weight, and since he lives in colorado, there will be no shortage of hills, so a 300 pound dude descending while braking can generate a lot of heat on the rims, which increases the chances of a blow out.

    these suggestions are purely based on hes weight and safety concerns, and it happens to be what he wants.

    giant defy advanced 1, full ultegra, disc brakes, carbon, 2600, use the left over cash to buy cloths.
    Last edited by greenlight149; 02-18-15 at 06:08 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdedes View Post
    if you absolutely must buy a bike, get a caliper braked 105 or sram force22 equipped bike. make sure the frame and fork have clearance for 28mm rubber minimum. the standard is going to take 5 years to develop.
    What about this bike? it has flat mount and is not coming out in 5 years?

    Koga Teases Disc Brake Road Bike w/ New Shimano Flat Mount Standard

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