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  1. #1
    The Silver Hammer emayex's Avatar
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    500 Miles Fixed....oy vey

    okay buddies

    so that bike i was obsessing over has been built 2 weeks now (steamroller+sugino 75 cranks/bb+ck headset+thomspn post/stem+whipperman chain+eai cog+white turbo; more details later)...ive got to post some pics but more importantly...i am 99% sure i will be registering for the charity trek montreal to boston AIDS ride in august.

    i have never put in more than about 50 miles in a day, this ride will be 5 back to back centuries

    i know all the usual putting in miles and maintaining a schedule stuff...and im going to be riding my tushy off for the next month and a half...but are there any radpid training techniques any of you would like to share so i dont end up dead...

    maybe even more than the typical riding and fitness...but nutrition too. is there a particularly high performance diet i should try switching to?

    i am willing to make a whole life style switch so please lay it on me

    also..if anybody here is doing it...want to bunk up? im doing it with a buddy...so i think we are looking for 2 roomates for that first night

    thanks y'all
    xoxo

    MAX


    (fine print...this belongs in this forum because i officially announced my new bike and because i want info from guys who do centuries in this much more rigorous manner)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Msngr's Avatar
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    i have so much to tell, but it is so late and i had two really strong marguaritas tonight. i'll help you manana, amigo.

  3. #3
    likes avocadoes
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    heh, like that info would fit here...
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    two words of advise for you:
    @ss lube

  4. #4
    fixpie missmercian's Avatar
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    taint butter nacho butter chamois butt'r
    get a good saddle with a cutout
    more butter
    good cork tape for your bars, and well padded gloves
    and then some more butt'r
    don't bring a bag
    but carry lots of water and energy bars
    and of course, lest we forget: butt'r.

  5. #5
    Senior Member filtersweep's Avatar
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    A bunch of co-workers rode the CA ride last week- a few were not what anyone would consider hardcore bikers, so they enlisted my assistance for training and "consultation." I split my time riding with them between fixed and geared.

    You'll probably find that for a huge percentage of riders, it isn't about biking- and avg. speeds will be relatively low. They technically don't even allow drafting- which is ridiculous until you consider the lack of experience many riders possess.

    One guy said he'd never do it again on a double chain ring. I don't know the mountains or elevation profile- or lack thereof, but gearing could be a huge issue. Another guy crashed out quite badly- had a concussion and was pulled from the ride. The two women with little experience did very well- but their focus was on finishing, and they really had nothing to prove.

    Other than that, I'd start ramping up your mileage to 250 miles/week- or more.

    If you are not a lycra fan, you might want to reconsider and buy some decent gear. I prefer bibs- with a quality pad.

    I hate saddles with cutouts- the cutout acts like a knife blade sticking into my ass- so I wouldn't consider that a blanket recommendation- but it might suit you just fine.

    I also don't ever use chamois butter. I good pad in a bib with a good fit on an ass that has spent hours in the saddle shouldn't arbitrarily require it- however, the crew that went applied it with a trowel.

    If you are even remotely homophobic, be prepared to be surrounded by men calling each other girlfriend, honey, *****, etc...

    Again, it is less about biking/performance and more about being able to tolerate long hours in the saddle. Some people will take 8 hours to finish a century, with all the stops, the pace, etc...

  6. #6
    Senior Member auroch's Avatar
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    as usual filtersweep offers the best advice ever. my additions:
    1. don't go to a discount warehouse & buy 2 boxes of powerbars unless you really really like them
    by the end you will hate powerbars more than anything else in the world

    2. bring at least 2 of everything lycra. saddle sores will mess you up big time.
    what do you call a saddle sore on your hand? the-worst-thing-ever.
    bring an extra pair of gloves too.

    3. if you have support bring a chair. after a long day nothing beats laying on
    the ground with your feet up in the air while hooked up to an IV full of the blood
    of race horses.

    4. um I didn't see a brake on your write up. get one.

    sounds like a good time

    Quote Originally Posted by filtersweep
    If you are not a lycra fan, you might want to reconsider and buy some decent gear. I prefer bibs- with a quality pad.

    I good pad in a bib with a good fit on an ass that has spent hours in the saddle shouldn't arbitrarily require it- however, the crew that went applied it with a trowel.

    Again, it is less about biking/performance and more about being able to tolerate long hours in the saddle. Some people will take 8 hours to finish a century, with all the stops, the pace, etc...

  7. #7
    Retrogrouch in Training bostontrevor's Avatar
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    First of all, let me be the first to say: KICK. ASS. To even think about this is a pretty massive undertaking. Given the short time frame and the X-TREME () fashion in which you're attempting it, I think you will need to make a pretty significant adjustment.

    Secondly, I'm told Boston-Montreal is pretty horrible. I know that southern Quebec is like a barren pancake but there's a TON of climbing in southern Vermont. Unfortunately, while Middlebury and Ludlow sit about 2,000 feet above sea level, Montreal is only 500 and Boston is 0, which means you have to climb only slightly less on the Montreal-Boston direction. Here's an elevation profile: http://www.geocities.com/b-m-b/route.html#Profile . Terrible.

    Speaking of BMB, talk to people who ride brevets. They'll give you good advice, I'm sure. How many days do you have to complete this? At least this should be a less arduous event than BMB (which is recommended for those with triples only!). This is "only" 425 miles in 102 hours which is a lot nicer than the 750 of BMB in 90.

    My own advice: have a few gears to pick from. Don't be afraid to do some in-field service. Maybe for the Quebec leg of the journey you have a set of relatively closely spaced gears on a flip-flop for the flats or perhaps even a nice high (relatively speaking) road gear plus a light climbing gear. That should take you to Middlebury.

    Given the wicked climbing and descending from Middlebury to Ludlow, I would probably do a wholesale gear change. I think maybe a couple of low climbing gears or a climbing gear and a freewheel descending gear. 20 miles of descending would suck on a low climbing gear. If you are determined to do it fixed all the way, then just have one very low climber and a higher descending gear that you can switch to at peak elevation.

    Then you're into rolling New England. That's a crap shoot. Hit something in the high-60s to low-70s. I did a metric (not long compared to what you've got coming) at 77" and one at 74" and both were a bit taller than I would have liked. I've got one coming up next weekend on 61" which I think will be much lower than necessary. But you can pretty much always spin, you can't always mash. The climbing and descending are generally not consistent enough in one direction to make it worth flipping a wheel.

    As for training, they say to increase your mileage about 10% each week. Of course that's when you're looking at a one-day event. Here your individual days aren't so terrible (a century? that's not so bad.) but it's four days in a row. I've heard you typically want to be able to ride 2/3 to 3/4 of your target mileage before the event. So taking that approach, maybe you want to do a double century or two-to-three days of consectutive centuries.

    Food-wise, STAY HYDRATED. That's so critical. It's easy to be under-hydrated and not notice until it's too late. Starting as much as a day before each major ride you should start drinking as much water as you can stand. Stop maybe 30 minutes before you start so that you aren't terribly bloated. Be sure to take the very last pee break you can. Otherwise you'll get about 10 minutes into the ride and realize you have to go. If you go with an off-the-shelf sports drink like Gatorade, mix it about 1:1 with water. This is an isotonic solution: it's salinity matches your blood's (more or less) and makes it very easy to absorb. The ghetto fabulous version is a 30%-50% OJ solution (thanks, MC). Throughout the ride continue to drink water before you're thirsty. The day before and day of, avoid alcohol which will dehydrate, cause your muscles to be sluggish, and put a strain on your liver and kidneys which need to be in good shape to process all the water and blood you'll be moving.

    Starchy foods are great in the few days leading up to your event. This is carbo-loading. It can raise the amount of glycogen stored in your muscles by something like 50%. During recovery (including while training) have some protein. If you're a vegetarian/vegan, beans and nuts are a good source of this. The day of your event, eat a light breakfast staying clear of fats and proteins. Some starch and lots of sugar is good. Fruit sugars are particularly good. On your ride each fruits, starch, and some protein. GORP: good ol' raisins and peanuts is still favored by many.

    Of course everything mentioned about proper riding gear is spot on. This is no place for proving a point about how core you are riding out there in shorts and a t-shirt with boxers underneath. Padded shorts are the most important (and be sure nothing comes between your ass and your chamois or I'll sic the underwear nazi on you). Fortunately, your training rides should sort out your gear selection for you.

    Good luck. I think it's quite doable, but it will require careful planning with regards to the terrain. Be sure to talk to others who have ridden this or randonneurs in general. I'm sure they have lots of really good advice to pass on.

  8. #8
    The King of Town manboy's Avatar
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    Yeah, I can just imagine trying to stop with backpressure/skidding when your legs have turned to jello after 5 consecutive centuries.

    "Look out! No brakes! Somebody please make a pile of pillows!"

    If you don't have one, go for the brake. I'll mail you one if you want.

  9. #9
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    Trevor, isn't Mr. Alexi planning to ride this on a custom johnny cycles bike?

  10. #10
    Retrogrouch in Training bostontrevor's Avatar
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    Really? I knew he wanted to get a custom touring frame built, but I didn't know he had plans for it. Or maybe I did and I just forgot.

    Oh yeah, last bit of advice. For your training, be sure to hit the hills. There's a lot hill work in there, so you'll need to get a feel for that.

  11. #11
    Spoked to Death phidauex's Avatar
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    Wow, great advice, everyone! You almost want to make ME do 500 miles on my fixie (but not quite ).

    I'd second the recommendation to be prepared to change gearing based on terrain... Check out detailed elevations of the route, and maybe make a plan. I know some company (Hozan?) sells a combination chainwhip/lockring tool that could be handy. With that and a few cogs, you could have a good combination of gears available to you (and if you slip a 20t freewheel into your bag 'just in case', we won't think any less of you).

    Good luck!

    peace,
    sam

  12. #12
    no one wants an alien FixednotBroken's Avatar
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    all the above advice sounds good. my two cents? DO NOT BONK. eat before you're hungry, and drink before you're thirsty. if you bonk, you have a very real chance of not finishing the ride, and i'm pretty sure you don't want that to happen.

    again, good luck, and good on ya.

  13. #13
    "I love lamp"
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    As far as eating during training just watch what you eat, don't worry too much about quanity but worry about the quality. You don't want to ruin an afternoon ride because you ate a crappy McGriddle for breakfast or something like that, you won't ride as well in training. Other than that my advice for during the ride food is to start experimenting now. Better to find out on a training ride that Cliff bars make you crap your pants. Try to find foods you like that will be readily available in convience stores, like pop tarts, fig newtons, yoo-hoo, snickers etc. At some point you may not be able to stomach power bars or the like but you will be able to down a Yoo Hoo and a king size Snickers. Also if you can stomach may I reccomend Ensure Plus, 350 calories for 8 oz, when you can't eat anymore you can just throw one back like a shot. I just did a double century and barely touched my bars and gels but I ate a crap load of granola mixed with m&m's, snickers, Yoo-Hoo, fruit, PB sandwhiches, and Ensure. Oh and drink and then drink some more. This is something you need to start now, start drinking like a gallon a day of fluids so you're body will be prepared for this much fluid intake. You can mess yourself up if you go from chronically dehydrated (which most people are) to slamming back gallons of water on a ride. If you are peeing clear you are fine, if not drink some more, clear is key.

    Just mentally prep yourself to be on the bike longer than you have to be, at a certain point it becomes less about fitness and all about mentally being able to do it. If you mentall prepare to be in the saddle for 8 hours than when you finish at 7 you'll be happy. Good Luck!

  14. #14
    The Silver Hammer emayex's Avatar
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    wow....ive said it before and ill say it again. i's love's you's guys's (clearly i can take the male flirting)

    some thoughts i had to your suggestions:
    gearing: im currently pushing 49x18, im most likely going to invest in a 43t-ish ring...and maayybe a freewheel (although prolly not)
    brakes:yes...i plan on this i think im gonna try to pick up a shimano 105 brake (will that fit the surly fork?) and nashbar cx levers (unless preferably somebody can hook me up with this stuff, id be more than happy to reward you handsomly)
    tushy:first:does butt balm really work? is it applied before or after the rash? second: im going to be using a selle italia turbo saddle...is it foolish for me to be relyign on such old tech...would i be better off investing in a flite etc...
    spandex:i started using it when i built my first fixed gear last year(im a poet and didnt even know it), ive only got one full kit now, so im gonna invest in at least one more for the ride. as far as the pad goes...is underwear really a no no? ive been riding with boxers under the spandex the whole time, is this a mistake?
    water:i already drink like a fish and i love gorp, but is there anything i should be eating now to begin prepping my body?

    i may have left some out ...ill think about it again later...i cant tell you how much i appreciate your advice (esp boston and filtersweep). you guys rock

    oh yes...training rides:ill be back in DC on monday...anybody want to do crazy miles with me?

  15. #15
    Senior Member
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    cycling shorts: no underwear. The chamois can't function as intended when you're wearing underwear. I think you'll find the shorts hugely comfortable--assuming they're the right shorts for you--once you make this change.

    training rides: I'm planning on a solo century saturday (sorry, chimbly, I think I'm skipping the alleycat). I'll be ready for another ride by monday. Give me a ring.

    --Jeff

  16. #16
    MaNiC! NZLcyclist's Avatar
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    in regard to the seat.... even if it is old... if it is CONFORTABLE, KEEP IT.... no point getting something else if it is comfy
    Scott Speedster S30
    Shimano 105 Shifters and Derailleurs
    FSA Energy 50/34 Compact Cranks
    Spinergy Stealth PBO Race wheels
    Sram OG 1070 casette

  17. #17
    fixpie missmercian's Avatar
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    ooh, that is some fantastic advice, i'll take it all into mind for my longdistancer. and as for booty butter, it certainly can't hurt ...perhaps its only a matter of preference.

  18. #18
    Retrogrouch in Training bostontrevor's Avatar
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    Re the gearing: you'll want more choices than that and you'll want it field serviceable, I'm pretty sure. There are 15% grades on this ride. That means don't get another ring, they're a pain to install, go for cogs. That's my opinion. But you've got some time to figure it out. Putting in some hilly miles will help you figure it out.

    The Turbo: I love 'em. I think they're not made anymore just because they're not flashy enough and they're kind of heavy. Again, put in some long miles on it and see how your ass feels.

    Speaking of your ass, yeah, ditch the underwear under the shorts. The point of padded shorts is not to give you a soft place to sit. Cotton chafes when it gets wet and leads to saddle sores given enough time. The spandex and chamois in your padded shorts don't. For them to work properly, they need to be the thing that's in contact with your skin. If you go with chamois cream, it should be applied liberally before you develop sores. They say it's not necessary with modern synthetic chamois but some people swear by it nonetheless.

    The best way to figure this all out is to stop sitting on the computer and get out and ride. A lot. There are training schedules online that will help you increase your mileage.

  19. #19
    guest rusholme's Avatar
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    for your butt butter questions:
    yes it works.

    if you get something, carry zinc oxide cream too. i usually put them both on to cover myself after one long day.

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