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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 08-21-05, 07:14 PM   #1
dbg
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Singleator with horizontal drops

Singlespeed rear wheels can be more difficult to re-attach than derailed/clustered ones. The chain comes off the crank while you string the rear cog, and then comes off the cog while you're trying to string the chainring, etc.. Rear derailers actually seem (to me) to help keep the chain well behaved.

So I plan to try a singleator just to keep the chain tensionsed, ..even though I have horizontal drops. Is this commonly done?
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Old 08-21-05, 07:57 PM   #2
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no and it's needless. there is no reason for the chain to come off the chainring or the cog. and don't use a road chain. they are designed to flex laterally along the chainline, for obvious reasons, which is a quality you don't need or want.
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Old 08-21-05, 08:06 PM   #3
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Well I was referring to times when I need to remove the rear wheel and re-attach it (like when transporting the bike inside my car).
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Old 08-21-05, 08:09 PM   #4
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move the wheel forward in the dropouts or all the way out of them if you must, get the chain off the cog intact (don't break the chain - i'm sure you're not). reverse the procedure when remounting the wheel, leaving the chain on the chainring since that doesn't move. really shouldn't be problematic

Last edited by eddiebrannan; 08-22-05 at 05:32 AM.
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Old 08-21-05, 08:16 PM   #5
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firstly, theyre not necessary... 2ndly, if youre referring to track drops, there is no derailleur tab for you to attach the singleator to
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Old 08-21-05, 08:19 PM   #6
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he's referring to horizontal dropouts as he said in the title of the post

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Old 08-21-05, 09:10 PM   #7
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dude if you're having trouble with horizontals and putting a chain on, then you might want to rethink how you put your chain on your cog.
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Old 08-21-05, 09:15 PM   #8
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just because it's off-topic, it seems like the right time to say that i hate when people call track ends "horizontal dropouts." they're not the same thing, kids... they're just not.

edit - i'm not necessarily accusing anyone in this thread of doing this... just sayin.
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Old 08-22-05, 10:01 AM   #9
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If you have forward facing horizontal dropouts (not trackends), I really think you just need a bit more practice. I ride a conversion with forward facing dropouts, and I can pull my wheel out and reinstall it super easily. Actually, forward facing dropouts are probably the simplest design ever for this. A singleator would only make it ten times more complicated. That's right--ten times.
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Old 08-22-05, 10:09 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSSasky
Actually, forward facing dropouts are probably the simplest design ever for this. A singleator would only make it ten times more complicated. That's right--ten times.
Ten times, as measured by independent labs. I have the results!

I agree, there's no point if you can achieve adequate tension on your own. In fact, the most practical single speed setup is horizontal dropouts with an integrated chain hanger. So simple and a minimum of messing with the chain.
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Old 08-22-05, 01:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostontrevor
Ten times, as measured by independent labs. I have the results!

I agree, there's no point if you can achieve adequate tension on your own. In fact, the most practical single speed setup is horizontal dropouts with an integrated chain hanger. So simple and a minimum of messing with the chain.
So what's this integrated chain hanger thing. If it holds the chain somewhat in position after the wheel is removed, and then stays out of play after re-installation, ..then maybe that's what I'm lookin for.

They are horizontal drops and tensioning is not a problem.

Re-installing a geared rear wheel is so simple because the derailer holds the chain in place. I don't have to touch the chain at all most of the time. With the SS I'm fiddling with the chain a lot during re-installation.
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Old 08-22-05, 01:45 PM   #12
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you don't need a chain hanger dbc. really, you have the easiest set-up for wheel removal in the world. when reinstalling the wheel get the chain around the chainring and around the bottom of the cog the kind of just roll the back cog along the chain into the entrance to the dropout and back until the chain is taut. man it takes so much more to try and describe than it actually is. rest the axle under the chainstays just forward of the dropouts while you get the chain in place, bike upright and on both wheels, then just slot in. beyond simple, really. anything else will make it TWELVE times as complicated. including any further posts. really. go and try it ten times in a row, realise how simple it actually is, then never think about it again
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Old 08-22-05, 01:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbq
Re-installing a geared rear wheel is so simple because the derailer holds the chain in place. I don't have to touch the chain at all most of the time. With the SS I'm fiddling with the chain a lot during re-installation
I'd say, get over not touching the chain. Most of the time, I just touch it, and wipe my hands immediately afterwards - if the grease is fresh, it tends to come off quickly. If I can't wipe my hands, I just keep my full-finger gloves on and do it. Just be careful what you touch with your gloves immediately after.

If you don't want to get dirty when you touch your bike, you could always take it to a shop. </sarcasm>
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Old 08-22-05, 04:45 PM   #14
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A chain hanger is the little post that you see on some frames on the inside of the drive side seat stays. It's a convenient place to hange the chain when you take the wheel off. But if you don't got it, you don't got it. It's not a big deal
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Old 08-22-05, 05:11 PM   #15
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So I'm getting the message that I should just get over myself and quit worrying about a little grease. Criticism accepted.

I think I still might experiment with a dynamic tensioner, though.
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Old 08-23-05, 08:44 AM   #16
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might as well keep the derailleur then dude. that way you get a "dynamic tensioner" and gears. whole point of singlespeed is to do away with redundant components for the pleasure of a simple, quiet, easy to maintain ride. this at the cost of the ease of gears. with your unneccessary tensioner you have all of the hassle and none of the benefits. why not just keep a rubber glove in your car trunk if you're fastidious?
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