Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-19-05, 06:14 AM   #1
jur
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,855
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Removing braze-ons from alloy frame...

I am building a singlespeed from an old Giant hybrid bike, the cable guides on the top of the top tube are these ugly chunky triple beasts, I want to lose them but am afraid to trash the frame. Filing them off is not so hot since they are big buggers, it will take forever, and one slip of the file... and no, I don't have a Dremel and don't plan to buy one. They cost more than a new bike here in Oz.

Can I use heat? It looks like they are either brazed or soldered on.
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 06:45 AM   #2
LóFarkas
LF for the accentdeprived
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Bikes:
Posts: 3,549
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Aluminium or steel frame? Heat is not an option for Al.
I sawed mine off and then used a file to remove the remining material. Sawing takes 5-10 mins with a good handsaw, filing takes 30 or so with a decent file. Of course, half the time is spent looking at the frame sideways to see where the actual tube starts. Being inexperienced with powertools, I wouldn't have liked to risk my frame trying to use one.

Ok, those times are for one single cable stop, but you can do the two triples in an afternoon for sure.
LóFarkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 07:26 AM   #3
biff
biff-o-matic
 
biff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Austin, TX
Bikes: Moyer Cycles #1 - A fixie of course.
Posts: 305
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Since it's an aluminum frame, the 'braze-on' is either epoxied or riveted on.

If it's riveted, you can just drill out the rivet. Pretty simple.

If it's epoxied, I would go with a file, and be very, very careful. It won't take you forever, 15 mins per guide tops. Don't use a power tool because one slip of something like that and you'll be tearing through your coke can.
biff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 02:11 PM   #4
Kogswell
Matthew Grimm / Flunky
 
Kogswell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 656
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jur
Can I use heat? It looks like they are either brazed or soldered on.
Use a light hack saw blade to cut them off. Wrap the surrounding tube w/ duct tape to avoid scaring. Make a couple of cuts if you have to.

Then use some sandpaper wrapped around the tube to finish. Wrapping the sandpaper will preclude you from making flat spots on the tube. Start w/ coarse and work to fine. When you do this, motion is like doing a shoeshine buff.

Practice on a crap frame until you get confident.
Kogswell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 06:17 PM   #5
jur
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,855
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kogswell
Use a light hack saw blade to cut them off. Wrap the surrounding tube w/ duct tape to avoid scaring. Make a couple of cuts if you have to.

Then use some sandpaper wrapped around the tube to finish. Wrapping the sandpaper will preclude you from making flat spots on the tube. Start w/ coarse and work to fine. When you do this, motion is like doing a shoeshine buff.

Practice on a crap frame until you get confident.
Thanks, this sounds good.

I was hoping to save some of the cable guides because I will need to attach 2 for the rear brake cable. Any advice on that?

Heh, after looking at some of the pics posted in the pics thread, this frame probably IS a crap frame...
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 07:04 PM   #6
honduraz10
Bikes are Fun
 
honduraz10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 187
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
sometimes you can just get a pair of beefy pliers, get a hood hold on the braze, and twist. you can get it off that way and then file the rest. ive only done this method with steel so i cant gauruntee itll work. you could also see if you could score a dremel, from someone/where. its super easy like that and you can cut cautiosly then file the rest.
honduraz10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-05, 07:08 PM   #7
jim-bob
hateful little monkey
 
jim-bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: oakland, ca
Bikes:
Posts: 5,274
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
..Or just leave them on. Maybe one day that frame will want gears again.
jim-bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-05, 11:09 AM   #8
scoundrl
))<>((
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mpls
Bikes:
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by honduraz10
sometimes you can just get a pair of beefy pliers, get a hood hold on the braze, and twist. you can get it off that way and then file the rest.
I've used Vise-Grips in the past (also only on steel). It takes about 10 seconds to snap the little fellas off. The downside to this is that you often end up with a lot of extra metal to sand - more than if you cut them off with a hacksaw.
scoundrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:24 PM.