Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-14-05, 12:38 PM   #1
killsurfcity
perspective distorts
Thread Starter
 
killsurfcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 25th and Girard
Bikes:
Posts: 1,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
wheel building

how many of you here build wheels? it's the one thing on a bike i have never done myself. but bike shops can be expensive and ****ty mechanics can let you down. so i figured i might try to pick it up. it's probably a pretty steep learning curve, so i wanted to hear other peoples experiences before buying a bunch of gear. do tell...
killsurfcity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:40 PM   #2
dolface
Iguana Subsystem
 
dolface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: san francisco
Bikes:
Posts: 4,016
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
it's not hard, sheldon's site has a pretty good tutorial.
go for it!
dolface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:42 PM   #3
teadoggg
Skidmaster
 
teadoggg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago
Bikes: don walker, redline, TBD
Posts: 1,627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
it's not nearly as hard as you'd link, assuming you have half (or even 25%) of a brain. Performance has a truing stand that's only like $40, and it served me very well. There are a couple of people who didn't like it, though.

Do it! It's fun to brag.
teadoggg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:43 PM   #4
marcelinyc
R900Campagnolo
 
marcelinyc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes: track and road
Posts: 884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
my first wheel took me 3 hours to build without any prior knowledge. it lasted for years. second wheel took an hour. I put something on the chainstay to true it.
marcelinyc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:45 PM   #5
PhattTyre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: 07 Fisher Paragon, 00' Lemond Buenos Aries, Specialized Langster, Schwinn World Sport SS townie, 99 SS-Works single speed conversion, early 90s Raleigh roadie rain bike, 07 Fisher Rig, Trek 520, and a home-modified chopper
Posts: 707
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you're good at truing a wheel and have some concept of what kind of tension the spokes should have, then you can build a wheel. Singlespeed wheels are a good place to start because the right and left spokes are usually the same length and there usually isn't any dish. Try Sheldon Brown's site on wheel building...

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

That will run you through the basics. If you're mechanically inclined it won't be a problem for you. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
PhattTyre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:49 PM   #6
46x17
dances with bicycle
 
46x17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: SF
Bikes:
Posts: 1,683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Read Gerd Schraners book on wheelbuilding
Jobst Brandt has one too but I much prefer Schraner.
46x17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:49 PM   #7
killsurfcity
perspective distorts
Thread Starter
 
killsurfcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 25th and Girard
Bikes:
Posts: 1,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by teadoggg
it's not nearly as hard as you'd link, assuming you have half (or even 25%) of a brain. Performance has a truing stand that's only like $40, and it served me very well. There are a couple of people who didn't like it, though.

Do it! It's fun to brag.
rad. that's what i like to hear. i'm generally good with technical things, especially ones that required physical action. i'm a diy sound electronics nerd, so i'm used to slaving away over something until i get it right. i'm sure spokes are a bit more forgiving than electronics. at least the spokes won't shock me, or start smoking.
killsurfcity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:49 PM   #8
vegivore
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I dove in and built a front wheel after a bit of reading up (Sheldon's tutorial is good). Got the parts and some linseed oil, and used a fork and brakes (progressively tightened with a tie as the wheel took shape) in place of a truing stand. It's been three bruising years without so much as a 1/4" turn of a nipple. You can do it.
vegivore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:51 PM   #9
herst
Just tighten everything
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: jamaica plain, ma
Bikes:
Posts: 133
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, I bought that performance truing stand, took an old 27 inch wheel and removed the spokes. Bought new ones and followed Sheldon's page. Now the wheel is on my beater and its still totally true.

If you have a good ear you can equalize spoke tension by pitch. I do that, then bring it into an LBS with a tensiometer and have them tell me how close I am to 100 [whatever the unit is]. Usually I just have to tweak it like a half turn and then true the wheel and its finished. Its sort of shockingly easy and you should totally go for it.
herst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 12:57 PM   #10
killsurfcity
perspective distorts
Thread Starter
 
killsurfcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 25th and Girard
Bikes:
Posts: 1,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
has anyone got the book "the bicycle wheel" (or whatever it's called) that sheldon recommends? i was thinking of picking that up as a guide.
killsurfcity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 01:01 PM   #11
teadoggg
Skidmaster
 
teadoggg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago
Bikes: don walker, redline, TBD
Posts: 1,627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
books??? awww, you don't need no stinkin' books. there's more than enough info on the web.
teadoggg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 01:17 PM   #12
LóFarkas
LF for the accentdeprived
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Bikes:
Posts: 3,549
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I built my wheels for the fixie, too. You can't really go wrong if you follow Sheldon's instructions, esp. if you can true a wheel already. I don't think I'll ever ride a wheel I didn't build (OK, unless there's a steep discount on a complete bike I want badly...)
LóFarkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 01:46 PM   #13
46x17
dances with bicycle
 
46x17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: SF
Bikes:
Posts: 1,683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by killsurfcity
has anyone got the book "the bicycle wheel" (or whatever it's called) that sheldon recommends? i was thinking of picking that up as a guide.
Yes that is the one by Jobst Brandt.

THough in my opinion the Gerd Schraner book called the "Art of Wheelbuilding" is way better. His lacing method alone is worth it.
46x17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 01:49 PM   #14
LóFarkas
LF for the accentdeprived
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Bikes:
Posts: 3,549
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
^^^Scan it, post it or PM it. I won't tell.
LóFarkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 01:54 PM   #15
killsurfcity
perspective distorts
Thread Starter
 
killsurfcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 25th and Girard
Bikes:
Posts: 1,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by teadoggg
books??? awww, you don't need no stinkin' books. there's more than enough info on the web.
you're probably right. i might get it anyway tho, as it seems pretty interesting.
i decided to try this out because i found some hums and rims i want to get and i asked how much it would be to build the wheels at my lbs and they said $40 each. i figured i could just spend that loot on wheel-building tools and do it myself.
killsurfcity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 02:57 PM   #16
Sheldon Brown
Gone, but not forgotten
 
Sheldon Brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newtonville, Massachusetts
Bikes: See: http://sheldonbrown.org/bicycles
Posts: 2,301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by killsurfcity
has anyone got the book "the bicycle wheel" (or whatever it's called) that sheldon recommends? i was thinking of picking that up as a guide.
Yep, we've got it. http://harriscyclery.com/books

Sheldon "Wheels" Brown
Code:
+----------------------------------------------+
|     If you wish in the world to advance,     |
|     Your merits you're bound to enhance;     |
|     You must stir it, and stump it,          |
|     And blow your own trumpet,               |
|     Or, trust me, you haven't a chance!      |
|                     --W.S. Gilbert           |
+----------------------------------------------+
Sheldon Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 03:01 PM   #17
SirrusPackage
Dirty White Boy
 
SirrusPackage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Bikes: 2004 Specialized Sirrus Comp, 1984 Raleigh Gran Prix fixed gear conversion
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 46x17
Read Gerd Schraners book on wheelbuilding
Jobst Brandt has one too but I much prefer Schraner.
Seconded. And wheelbuilding is a stone cold gas.
SirrusPackage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 03:42 PM   #18
brooklyn
Senior Member
 
brooklyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Brooklyn
Bikes:
Posts: 639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
wheres a good place toget spokes and nipples?
brooklyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 04:11 PM   #19
rmwun54
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have built 9 rims so far, road, mtb, and cyclocross with disc. Not really difficult if you do it enough. All I use is the Performance truing stand and the bike as the final gauge. Radial, three cross, is what I have been playing with. The first two rims were a learning experience but after that and a little research no problem with building them nowadays.
rmwun54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 04:12 PM   #20
Dogbait
lunatic fringe
 
Dogbait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Miles from Nowhere, Columbia County, OR
Bikes: 1980 Schwinn World Sport, 1982 Schwinn Super Le Tour, 1984 (?) Univega Single Speed/Fixed conversion, Kogswell G58 fixed gear, 1987 Schwinn Super Sport
Posts: 1,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
FYI,
Schraner's book is on sale at AMAZON
Dogbait
Dogbait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 04:17 PM   #21
46x17
dances with bicycle
 
46x17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: SF
Bikes:
Posts: 1,683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogbait
FYI,
Schraner's book is on sale at AMAZON
Dogbait
Just make sure you replace DT with Sapim throughout the book.

DT supposedly changed the distance from the elbow to the head to make lacing easier for machines, which causes them to break a lot easier.

Never built or rode DT so I can't confirm, but I do take my LBS's word for it.

Sapims have been great so far!
46x17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 04:20 PM   #22
dolface
Iguana Subsystem
 
dolface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: san francisco
Bikes:
Posts: 4,016
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklyn
wheres a good place toget spokes and nipples?
i usually get the from my lbs, so i don't have to deal with figuring out spoke lengths. i bring them the hub and rim, tell them what lacing pattern i'm going to use, and they do all the math.
dolface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 04:39 PM   #23
Aeroplane
jack of one or two trades
 
Aeroplane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Suburbia, CT
Bikes: Old-ass gearie hardtail MTB, fix-converted Centurion LeMans commuter, SS hardtail monster MTB
Posts: 5,637
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wheelbuilding is super-not-hard. Not easy, but definitely easier than filing your taxes.

Also, building a wheel is a great way to while away a rainy afternoon (like the past 8 days).
Aeroplane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 05:17 PM   #24
techone
dead mileage
 
techone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: London U.K.
Bikes: GT Mtnbike, PaulMilnes Trackbike
Posts: 480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dolface
it's not hard, sheldon's site has a pretty good tutorial.
go for it!

... all you need really...
Well, hubs spokes/nipples and rims will help also.
techone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-05, 06:27 PM   #25
d_D
645f44
 
d_D's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Oxford, Uk
Bikes:
Posts: 482
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If your going to splash out for a truing stand think about spending the cash on a tension meter instead. The park one is the same sort of price as a cheap truing stand. It removes all the guess work from trying to get the correct amount of tension and you can check the tension is even between spokes.

For just a couple of wheels it's not too much bother to use the frame instead of a truing stand.
d_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:22 AM.