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  1. #1
    Senior Member thenathanator's Avatar
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    "one writer in a major magazine article quite a few years ago claimed that after considerable testing with many different riders, 18.5% of the distance from the top of the femur to the floor in bare feet should be the crank length." http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

    I just measured myself... and apparently I need a 185mm crank... (I'm 6'4").
    I think that would pose some problems with pedal strikes... but I haven't gotten my frame yet.

    Do most tall people just run 170mm cranks? seeing as a 185mm could be hard to come by.
    Yes, I can ride it.
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    No, someone didn't steal the other wheel.
    No, I can't do a wheelie.

    Being a unicyclist can suck sometimes.

  2. #2
    Iguana Subsystem dolface's Avatar
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    i'm pretty sure that's for geared bikes

  3. #3
    5mm More Power
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    Let me tell you something before other losers chime in.

    [170]mm cranks are the way to go. They are the most versatile and help get the most power for your pedal stoke. Some may say that [165]mm are the way to go but those are for chumps. Period.

    [185]mm cranks are very hard to come by. I don't see them(him) around all that much. But, if you trying to go big you can try to take on [190]mm cranks but those are for tri-geeks.

    [172.5]mm cranks are sometimes seen as a compromise. But, only women compromise. You want power? Beauty? Speed? Then you have to choose [170]mm cranks.

    I couldn't resist.

    But the truth had to be spoken.

    See my previous thread on how I am the far superior crank length.
    Far Better Than All Other Crank Lengths!

  4. #4
    Senior Member thenathanator's Avatar
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    I knew it wouldn't be long before you chimed in
    now let's just wait for [165] to arrive...
    Yes, I can ride it.
    No, it doesn't hurt.
    No, someone didn't steal the other wheel.
    No, I can't do a wheelie.

    Being a unicyclist can suck sometimes.

  5. #5
    LF for the accentdeprived
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    I always thought it'd be logical for long-legged people to have longer cranks for the same feel and optimum power output... Which would mean that I, at 6'2" with looong legs should ride a 180 or so. But on a fixed gear, this minor consideration is overshadowed by pedal strike issues, so 170 is the way to go- on my frame, anyway. I don't really see the need for short cranks on a trackframe, though... they have high BB's anyway, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by dutret
    Do you deny that you are clueless or do you just think that "moron" didn't need to be tacked on there?
    Bike on flickr and on FGG

  6. #6
    jack of one or two trades Aeroplane's Avatar
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    I'll third the 170's... seems like a happy medium for a long-legged freak on a fixed-gear conversion. I'm not that long-legged (33" biking inseam) and I'm rocking 170's on the conversion with no issues.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Irwin Goldstein
    Men should never ride bicycles. Riding should be banned and outlawed. It is
    the most irrational form of exercise I could ever bring to discussion.

  7. #7
    Spawn of Satan
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    I am 6'5" with a 36” inseam.

    I have tried 170, 172.5 and 175 on fixies. I do mostly open road riding with a little city riding. For me the 172.5, 175's work the best where I live. You can get up the hills easier and, most importantly, it is easier on the downhills. I have found you can descend steep grades easier with longer cranks because it is harder too wind out the rpm's.

    I can get the 172.5 up to about 170+ rpm's on a few hills. The 175's would drop that to about 160-165 rpm's on the same hill, and I would lose some speed. I do not like spinning above 170 rpm's for too long, I do not find it comfortable.


    The downside of the longer cranks are: I am very aware of my speed on tight turns. Fast downhills with blind turns scare the $**t out of me because of possible pedal strike.

    I basically give up maneuverability to go up and down hills easier. That works for me.

  8. #8
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [170]
    Let me tell you something before other losers chime in.
    This is my favorite thing Super Rookie's alter-ego has ever said: other losers. Admittance of the fact that he realizes he is a loser. Half-clever.

    Why 165? I prefer a faster spin up. And if 5mm does not make that much of a difference, why 170 vs 165?

    It is all personal fit and feel here. Super Rookie needs the extra leverage. I like to get up to speed faster. When I picked up riding the velodrome, I was taught on 165 and was informed that 165 is good for steeper banks. I stuck with it. I know a few riders that push 167.5s at Northbrook since it is a flatter track. Meh - I have 165s, I am sticking with 'em. Who knows: maybe as I get older and slower and drop down to SR/170s level of racing, I will need 170s. For now - I stay 165.
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  9. #9
    Barbieri Telefonico huhenio's Avatar
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    @ captsven

    I hear ya ... turning in traffic have to be performed at moderate speeds, like 15mph tops.
    Giving Haircuts Over The Phone

  10. #10
    information sponge
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    Quote Originally Posted by thenathanator
    "one writer in a major magazine article quite a few years ago claimed that after considerable testing with many different riders, 18.5% of the distance from the top of the femur to the floor in bare feet should be the crank length." http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

    I just measured myself... and apparently I need a 185mm crank... (I'm 6'4").
    I think that would pose some problems with pedal strikes... but I haven't gotten my frame yet.

    Do most tall people just run 170mm cranks? seeing as a 185mm could be hard to come by.

    If bikes were built the way they should be, you would have 185mm cranks and a bb height that would match. As it is, bikes tend to be mass-produced (as do cranks) and there are "standards" in crank length/bb height that don't serve everyone's needs. If you really want to try out a longer crank, see what kinda BMX stuff you can find, they tend to run MUCH longer cranks (almost everything is 180 as opposed to 170 as the standard). I just checked Profile Racing's website (http://www.profileracing.com/) and they offer 190mm cranks. If you want to go this route, a custom frame with an appropriately high bb is probably going to be the way to go. Also, ask DonWalker/JonnyCycles about this and see what they say.
    Philosophy and feelings don't change the laws of physics

  11. #11
    Halifax, NS. Brensan's Avatar
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    Can someone clear something up for me? I always thought that a higher bottom bracket meant a shorter seat tube. Wouldn't that mean that a trade of higher bb and longer crank would feel the same as someone with a lower bb and shorter crank (relatively) since the distance from saddle to peddle wouldn't really change? Is this totally wrong? Is a higer bb from angled stays?

    I'm pretty tall, like 6'3" and I ride a big road frame conversion. If I was to buy a track frame with a higher bb wouldn't I want longer cranks then what I am riding now to keep the same fit?

    Sorry if this doesn't make sense.
    Out.

  12. #12
    Barbieri Telefonico huhenio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brensan
    Can someone clear something up for me? I always thought that a higher bottom bracket meant a shorter seat tube. Wouldn't that mean that a trade of higher bb and longer crank would feel the same as someone with a lower bb and shorter crank (relatively) since the distance from saddle to peddle wouldn't really change? Is this totally wrong? Is a higer bb from angled stays?

    I'm pretty tall, like 6'3" and I ride a big road frame conversion. If I was to buy a track frame with a higher bb wouldn't I want longer cranks then what I am riding now to keep the same fit?

    Sorry if this doesn't make sense.
    I wish I was 6'3'' ... to push 185 cranks like Indurain.
    Giving Haircuts Over The Phone

  13. #13
    information sponge
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brensan
    Can someone clear something up for me? I always thought that a higher bottom bracket meant a shorter seat tube. Wouldn't that mean that a trade of higher bb and longer crank would feel the same as someone with a lower bb and shorter crank (relatively) since the distance from saddle to peddle wouldn't really change? Is this totally wrong? Is a higer bb from angled stays?

    I'm pretty tall, like 6'3" and I ride a big road frame conversion. If I was to buy a track frame with a higher bb wouldn't I want longer cranks then what I am riding now to keep the same fit?

    Sorry if this doesn't make sense.

    generally I think you'd put your post a bit higher to compensate.
    Philosophy and feelings don't change the laws of physics

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brensan
    Can someone clear something up for me? I always thought that a higher bottom bracket meant a shorter seat tube. Wouldn't that mean that a trade of higher bb and longer crank would feel the same as someone with a lower bb and shorter crank (relatively) since the distance from saddle to peddle wouldn't really change? Is this totally wrong? Is a higer bb from angled stays?
    So let's assume you fit yourself the same way on either bike, so:
    Exposed seat post + seat tube + crank arm = max leg extension, and you're right, that would be the same on either bike if you fit yourself the same.
    However, what about min leg extension:
    Exposed seat Post + seat tube - crank arm = min leg extension. Obviously this is different when the crank arm length is different.

    So it's really the spin that is different, longer cranks give you more leverage, shorter cranks are easier to spin. Generally people with longer legs feel more comfortable with longer cranks.

  15. #15
    na975
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    167.5 ffor me, pedal strike is a B****!

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