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  1. #1
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
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    46x16 vs. 46x18?

    I just started commuting on my bike to work. It's only about 3 miles from my house to work. Getting there is easy, since it's mostly a slight downhill ride. However on the ride back, it's mostly a gradual climb. I just started riding again, but it really takes a lot out of me. I'm running 46x16 at the moment, and I'm thinking about switching to 46x18 during the week when I'm commuting. I went for a 10 mile ride on mostly flat roads and I was fine.

    Is 46x18 noticably easier than 46x16, or should I be looking at a larger chainring?


    Now I have the IRO fixed/free flip flop. I have the 16 on the fixed side. I know I need a cog and a lockring, what other parts are involved? What tools do you need to do this yourself?

    Now I don't plan to be swapping out my cogs all the time, but I'm going to head to my local bike shop/school and have them help me do it (should I decide to go with the 18).

  2. #2
    live free or die trying humancongereel's Avatar
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    if you're looking at the chainring, look smaller, not bigger.

  3. #3
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    I ride 46x16 and used to ride 46x18 (and I still have the 18t cog on the other side of my hub). They are appreciably different (almost 8 gear inches I think). I used the 18t cog when I lived in a hilly-er area when I first started to ride fixed. It worked out pretty well, although now I just stick with 16 for the most part, even when I'm in hilly areas.

  4. #4
    Senior Member jasonsan's Avatar
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    Yes, switching to an 18 will be noticably easier. You may need to add links to your chain, or simply buy a new chain cuz you're going bigger. Possible tool needed for this is a chain tool. You can probably re-use the lockring ya got on your hub now, and just get a new cog.You will need a chainwhip ( make sure it's the right size as your cog, there are two sizes) to get the cog off and a lockring tool for removal and installation of....well...the lockring. G'luck. Oh...and get some good grease. Clean and re-grease your parts before installation.I mean bike parts, of course.

  5. #5
    Barbieri Telefonico huhenio's Avatar
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    Check the chart/

    1 jump on cog size is a larger jump on inches develpment - effort needed - than 1 jump on ring size.

    And cogs are cheaper, unless you have a ring already lined up or something
    Giving Haircuts Over The Phone

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