Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-13-05, 07:53 AM   #1
InVeloVeritas
irrational devotion
Thread Starter
 
InVeloVeritas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Waterloo, ON
Bikes: SoBe hardtail, GF Cake, Trek 1200, "Italian Cruiser", Ishwata Aerosteel (Fixed), Fetish Cycles Position (track)
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
MKS Chain Tensioners

Don't worry, not another "how much do you love/anti-love these wares" thread.

Just had a question regarding the "sized for aluminum" units. Even oversized, the pocket in the tensioner is not wide enough to accomondate the frame fork end + aluminum insert. Is it safe to run them just contacting the edges of the fork end, or should I look at shaping them to drop into the tensioner. The MKS itself appears to be cast, so I think it might be easier to grind the "soft" aluminum pad (read: replacable mounting surface in the fork ends) in order to make it fit.
I guess all this boils down to is: has anyone tried re-shaping the MKS tensioner (wide one) to fit "extra-wide" aluminum fork ends, or is it not worth bothering (and just running them as is).

An associated question, does the eyelet in the tensioner run between the hub and frame, or frame and nut? I can see in the later that it would be significantly more important to have a nice snug fit with the tensioner, given that if it slipped you'd lose a bunch of chain tension in a hurry (the eyelets are not serrated like track nuts are). I guess the hub locknuts are serrated as well, so perhaps the point is moot. I've worked with BMX style tensioners before, and it's quite obvious they need to be on the outside, but with these going down the middle of the fork end it's a bit ambiguous.

Cheers!
InVeloVeritas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-05, 08:10 AM   #2
shants
roll'em high
 
shants's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: columbus, ohio
Bikes:
Posts: 2,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
so long as they are held on the actual fork end ends, you should be fine. if you have your tensioners under enough stress to cause problems on aluminum, you are misunderstanding their purpose. they are largely intended for 'dialing-in' your chain tension - not so much holding that tension against the stresses of riding. that is the purpose of, naturally, the track nuts. that said, they can help against minor slippage, but when they do that, they still aren't under much force -- they are just counteracting the little bit that the track nut/fork end interface isn't dealing with (in a slipping situation). this is all to say that you shouldn't worry about it. it would be dumb as hell to modify your frame (ends, etc) to accomodate a tensioner.

the keirin setup is to have the eyelet on the inside -- keirin frames are spaced accordingly (112-113, 122-123). naturally, your aluminum frame probably doesn't do this, so you can put them withever way works. i would tend to put them on the inside, still, because i wouldn't want to be torquing my track nuts against anything other than the ends themselves.
shants is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-05, 09:04 AM   #3
InVeloVeritas
irrational devotion
Thread Starter
 
InVeloVeritas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Waterloo, ON
Bikes: SoBe hardtail, GF Cake, Trek 1200, "Italian Cruiser", Ishwata Aerosteel (Fixed), Fetish Cycles Position (track)
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by shants
so long as they are held on the actual fork end ends, you should be fine. if you have your tensioners under enough stress to cause problems on aluminum, you are misunderstanding their purpose. they are largely intended for 'dialing-in' your chain tension - not so much holding that tension against the stresses of riding. that is the purpose of, naturally, the track nuts. that said, they can help against minor slippage, but when they do that, they still aren't under much force -- they are just counteracting the little bit that the track nut/fork end interface isn't dealing with (in a slipping situation). this is all to say that you shouldn't worry about it. it would be dumb as hell to modify your frame (ends, etc) to accomodate a tensioner.

the keirin setup is to have the eyelet on the inside -- keirin frames are spaced accordingly (112-113, 122-123). naturally, your aluminum frame probably doesn't do this, so you can put them withever way works. i would tend to put them on the inside, still, because i wouldn't want to be torquing my track nuts against anything other than the ends themselves.
Thanks for the info.

Well, held on is a relative term I guess. The MKS style are meant to cup the entire fork end. Given that mine are a mm or so too wide, they rest half-on, half-off. Agreed, if they're only dialing in the tension until the trakc nuts are snugged down, then it's really just a matter of asthetics. My only concern would be setting up a weird stress-state in the tensioner if the wheel slips and the tensioner starts to twist because it's not fully seated. Hmm..perhaps it's vice/file time for that thing...

Alright, so inside it is (makes more sense to me), given that the eyelet diameter is about the same size as the hub locknut, and not nearly as large an OD as the serrated track nut.
InVeloVeritas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-05, 09:30 AM   #4
ImOnCrank
Yay!11! I has!!!1
 
ImOnCrank's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eastcoast
Bikes: Cocaine the white stallion, Custom Witcomb pista, (Being restored) 80's Pogliaghi Track, (destroyed) RAP Round Breeze NJS, Cannondale Jekyll 900, 84/5 Pinarello Montello (all italian)
Posts: 1,659
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by shants
i wouldn't want to be torquing my track nuts against anything other than the ends themselves.
I torque my tracknuts on everything. Anyways inside the frame works best for me. Just make sure you don't break em they're kind fragile and tend to split in half.
__________________
Bloodstains, speed kills, fast bikes, cheap thrills, French girls, fine wine...
ImOnCrank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-05, 10:49 AM   #5
Jose R
downtube shifter
 
Jose R's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: NYC
Bikes: Custom DeanUSA El Diente CTI, Andante Track
Posts: 561
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here is someone who carved out his MKS chain tensioners with a dremel tool:




Ti Fix

"I also started running an MKS tugnut, which -is- color coordinated, on the drive side. It's a nice minimalist piece of kit and allows almost vernier adjustment of chain tension and wheel alignment.

The only drawback is that they're made for narrower steel forkends. I resolved the fit issue on my fatter ti forkends by carving out the inner wall of the chaintug with a dremel tool. They probably should have been made that way in the first place since it doesn't affect function in the slightest while allowing them to work on any forkend.
"

I personally have used the MKS tensioners both on the inside and outside. The inside makes more sense, but be forewarned they may be a real ***** to get off. My mechanic griped at me about how hard and how much work it was to get the tugs off the axle. For now, I use them on the outside as in the pictures above.
__________________
For Sale:True Temper Alpha Q Fork
Jose R is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:20 AM.