Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salem, MA
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Level Professional, Tsunami singlespeed, Giant Reign 1
    Posts
    2,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm intrigued by chain tensioners, and I'm considering them on my Mark V. However. I've gathered that NJS frames are spaced to accomodate the use of chain tensioners. Can one use chain tensioners on frames that do not have specific NJS rear dropout spacing? Are there any detrimental effects from using chain tensioners?

  2. #2
    blah onetwentyeight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    5,573
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yea you can still use them. if your drop outs are too wide MKS makes some beefier ones (i think 9mm).. If those still don't fit, you can dremel off a side. Theres also more "techy" looking ones that would work. Only downside I can think of to using chain tensioners is it takes longer to get your wheel off when you need to change a flat.

  3. #3
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    WI
    My Bikes
    Titus road, Fort CX
    Posts
    8,270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    go with the generic ones:
    http://businesscycles.com/trtool_chaintugs.htm
    for $7.50 (I have used one on my non-Japanese frames and it fits fine)

    The time spent removing these tugs is negligible at best. Just keep a set of mini-pliers or a box-wrench that fits on-hand for easy removale
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    636
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You don't have to worry about the extra 3 mm spacing that many keirin frames now put into their rear spacing to accommodate tugs. Just let the flat part of the tug sit on the outside, directly under the track nut. It isn't quite as non-slippable as having that part on the inside, but you'd only see the difference in UCI-level sprinting or kilo.

    That being said, the easier solution is to spread the stay ends a hair. You can do it with your bare hands on most bikes (try it in very small increments because you'd be surprised how much you can over-spread it). If you can't budget it that way, grab a car tire jack and use it instead. Jack it open just a bit and leave it for an hour. You'll find the metal retains a bit of a memory of its new position. Again, work in small doses.

  5. #5
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salem, MA
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Level Professional, Tsunami singlespeed, Giant Reign 1
    Posts
    2,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    so how hard does one tighten the axle nuts? i guess i'm sort of confused about how *exactly* these things work.

  6. #6
    the tall guy. crayonsemble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    the home of jazz new york city
    Posts
    240
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sers
    so how hard does one tighten the axle nuts? i guess i'm sort of confused about how *exactly* these things work.
    sheldon brown says "Note! Chain tensioners cannot be used with fixed-gear or coaster brake systems!

    They don't maintain tension when there is backward force applied to the pedals, and the chain can derail as a result."

  7. #7
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    WI
    My Bikes
    Titus road, Fort CX
    Posts
    8,270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ther are two type of devices that fall into the category of chain tensioners:
    1. ones that secure the rear axle in place
    2. ones that act on the chain itself, applying pressure of some sort to take the slack out of the chain (like a derailleur - surly's tensioner is a good example of this)
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  8. #8
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salem, MA
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Level Professional, Tsunami singlespeed, Giant Reign 1
    Posts
    2,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [165]
    ther are two type of devices that fall into the category of chain tensioners:
    1. ones that secure the rear axle in place
    2. ones that act on the chain itself, applying pressure of some sort to take the slack out of the chain (like a derailleur - surly's tensioner is a good example of this)
    this post is about category 1.

  9. #9
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salem, MA
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Level Professional, Tsunami singlespeed, Giant Reign 1
    Posts
    2,190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by crayonsemble
    sheldon brown says "Note! Chain tensioners cannot be used with fixed-gear or coaster brake systems!

    They don't maintain tension when there is backward force applied to the pedals, and the chain can derail as a result."

    it seems to me that one could first use the chain tensioners to acheive proper tension and then tighten down the axle nuts to keep that tension.

    ...but then again i'm not sure of that, that's why i posted the thread.

  10. #10
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    WI
    My Bikes
    Titus road, Fort CX
    Posts
    8,270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sers
    this post is about category 1.
    yes, I am aware of that. I was clarifying this for crayonsemble
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  11. #11
    Senior Member Rancid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    oPt via Spokane, WA
    My Bikes
    Chromoly Allez comp with Ultegra/DA, IRO Rob Roy
    Posts
    842
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sers
    it seems to me that one could first use the chain tensioners to acheive proper tension and then tighten down the axle nuts to keep that tension.
    Thats what I always have used mine for.....that was the only logical way to use it I figured
    I've been here since 2004? I've never felt this old before.

  12. #12
    Fear the banana YellowFixedGear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New York City (Uptown)
    My Bikes
    1950s EG Bates track & 1960s Frejus track
    Posts
    719
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [165]
    go with the generic ones:
    http://businesscycles.com/trtool_chaintugs.htm
    for $7.50 (I have used one on my non-Japanese frames and it fits fine)

    The time spent removing these tugs is negligible at best. Just keep a set of mini-pliers or a box-wrench that fits on-hand for easy removale

    Wow! Thats all hardware store items.
    you can make those chaintugs yourself for about 3 bucks.


  13. #13
    Senior Member trespasser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    london
    Posts
    307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by YellowFixedGear
    Wow! Thats all hardware store items.
    you can make those chaintugs yourself for about 3 bucks.

    maybe that's why they sell those for $3 here in Japan...

  14. #14
    Crapzeit! mcatano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    2,553
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by trespasser
    maybe that's why they sell those for $3 here in Japan...
    ...and $1.25 here in Canada.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •