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  1. #1
    sh!thead on dynamite BEARPAW!!!'s Avatar
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    essential tools?

    looking to build up a workable set of tools to cover everything from road repairs to project bikes.
    can someone recommend a decent set of tools, or even individual *cant live without them* tools that any self respecting fixie enthusiast should have in their collection?
    additionally, the gf hopped on my bike today as she was dropping it by the shop for me [her first time on a fixie], and stated 'i think you have a convert', which means she's going to go out and find an old road bike to convert, so any tools necessary for that project are definitely a must have for the summer.
    thx
    nick
    Last edited by BEARPAW!!!; 06-27-06 at 03:00 PM.

  2. #2
    ` schloe mo's Avatar
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    just about everyone i know has a 15mm wrench in their bag.

    other than that.... allen wrenches, bottom bracket tool, crank puller, chain whip, lockring tool, chainring bolt tool (this has been very helpful).. just off the top of my head.

    have you read the almighty book of Sheldon yet?

    oh and if someone in Chicago bought a headset press, they'd be extremely popular. maybe too popular.

  3. #3
    crotchety young dude el twe's Avatar
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    15 mm wrench
    Patch kit
    Spare tube
    Tire levers (2 or 3)
    CO2 inflator or mini-pump
    Cash
    Allen keys
    Chain tool (just in case)
    A few spare chain links (you never know)

    EDIT - This is just what I like to have in my bag when I'm on the road, not what I have at home
    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacKid View Post
    I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
    IRO Angus Casati Gold Line

  4. #4
    THIS SPACE FOR RENT
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    search the mechanics forum for threads like this, and you will find everything you need. Deraileurs don't really require specialized tools, so it pretty much all applies. The only real fixed-specific tool is a chainwhip with 1/8" chain if that's what your drive train is. The other fixed-specific comment I would make is skip the chain cleaner rigs, they're kind of a pain for fixed since you have to put just the right amount of slack in the chain and you might as well just get yourself a master link and clean the cog, chainring, and bike when you do the chain (though somebody will of course show up here immediately and talk about how much they love theirs and how they use it every day before breakfast)
    "I don't buy new frames, it just encourages them."

    -T.G.

  5. #5
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    - 15mm wrench (for most hubs)
    - Park 3 spoke allen wrench for all allen bolts (seat, seatpost, stem, bars, pedals, chainring, Phil hubs)
    - Park Chain breaker
    - Park Chain whip
    - Park Lockring wrench
    - Air pump
    - Tire levers
    - Park Grease for lots of places
    - Tri-Flow for the chain

    Those tools will cover everthing except the bottom bracket, which you probably won't fool with anyway.

  6. #6
    i don't stop travsi's Avatar
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    ....a lockring wrench

    edit: yeah, i see it now carleton.

  7. #7
    i don't stop travsi's Avatar
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    ...but i think an enthusiast should also have things
    like bottom bracket tools, headset wrenches, cone
    wrenches and also tools to remove and install
    headset cups.

  8. #8
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by travsi
    ...but i think an enthusiast should also have things
    like bottom bracket tools, headset wrenches, cone
    wrenches and also tools to remove and install
    headset cups.
    Yeah, but when you do a cost/benefit analysis. It's actually cheaper to let the LBS do it than to buy the tools to do it yourself...unless you are changing headset and BBs all of the time.

  9. #9
    i don't stop travsi's Avatar
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    i got a used original campy bb wrench for 10 bucks,
    a headset cup remover is only $28, but yeah, a headset
    installer is a bit pricey. i have access to a press that
    i carefully use.

  10. #10
    na975
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    i figure if i get a big enough mess bag i can carry my entire tool box, this way i will be prepared for Armageddon

  11. #11
    eibwen
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    Most things have been covered, however:

    The park lockring wrench is trash, a decent set of lockring pliers is well worth the money and your knuckles will thank you.

    the chainwhip is now unnecessary, but unless you're Italian you should still use a lockring (that's what your new set of Hozan pliers is for).

  12. #12
    i am sure that i hate you spud's Avatar
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    get the Tomity NJS chainwhip and lockring tool.
    putting the pi back in pirate!
    Itís an upstanding member of the solar system
    Apply the laws of earth and make it a victim
    Of Proposition 187

  13. #13
    Senior Member Surferbruce's Avatar
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    i like really good quality allen wrenchs for home use. i have a set of Bondhus allens, they're long and have a ball end on the long side. i hate using any others now.
    for on the road my latest fave is a stubby 15mm Gearwrench w/ ratchet.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    dkb
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    If you're going to get an old bike and fix it up, tear it down completely, down to the last nut and bolt and cable and either repaint the frame or regrease all your bearings, then put it all back together. In the process you'll see what tools are needed, what tools you already have, and what tools you'd like to have to make the job easier.

    You'll find out which bike shops have the tools and parts and which sears and wallmarts are the closest. Then if something happens "on the road" you'll know what to do and maybe why that something happened in the first place.

    Just collecting a "what if" set of tools is kind of lame. Support your local bike shop mechanic instead, he'll appreciate it.

  15. #15
    Me talk pretty one day. eyefloater's Avatar
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    Hozan lockring pliers would be the best gift EVAR.

  16. #16
    King Among Runaways hyperRevue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyefloater
    Hozan lockring pliers would be the best gift EVAR.
    I'll make you a pair out of a nice craftsman channel-lock for a fraction of the price.
    "I owe everyone an apology" - hyperrevue

  17. #17
    Senior Member
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    dkb you're lame.

  18. #18
    WTF?
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    i'd suggest getting a set of bike tools that pedros or someone else sells. there are different sets available at different price levels. just decide how much you want to spend. it's certainly a lot cheaper than buying them individually.

    as for things like headset wrenches, bottom bracket tools, cone wrenches, i think you'll be surprised how often you'll use these tools. especially if you ride in bad weather a lot. plus you can help other people out.

    if you're going to do a conversion, i would recommed repacking all the bearings, and possibly replacing the brake cables.

    Quote Originally Posted by dkb
    Just collecting a "what if" set of tools is kind of lame. Support your local bike shop mechanic instead, he'll appreciate it.
    i'm sorry, i think this is really poor advice. that's like saying "don't learn to cook, support your local chef."
    as someone who fixes a lot of bikes, i would much rather see someone come and ask me questions and do the work themselves than pay me to do it for them. there are some people who don't really care or want to know how bikes work, and they should take their bikes to the mechanic so they can ride a bike that is fun to ride, is properly adjusted and doesn't squeak. people who have the desire to learn to fix bikes should absolutely fix them themselves, it really isn't that hard.

  19. #19
    the goal
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton
    Yeah, but when you do a cost/benefit analysis. It's actually cheaper to let the LBS do it than to buy the tools to do it yourself...unless you are changing headset and BBs all of the time.
    At my local shop the BB tool was the same proce as getting the bike shop to switch the BB. Paid once and now I can do it myself forever (until I bought a few different BBs which needed different tools).

    To the OP - if you arer going to convert an old 10 speed then take the old BB out with a big adjustable spanner and then get a shimano sealed unit and the tool to put it in. Should work out well in functionality and cost terms

  20. #20
    Spawn of Satan
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    The tool that might cost a lot now but pay for itself in the long term is a truing stand. If you think you will be riding bikes for the rest of your life, get a truing stand now. This is one tool I wish I would have bought 20 years ago. I have had one for four years (due to the feedback from this forum) and it is awesome.

    I am guessing a good portion of the riders on this forum have anywhere from a slight to moderate wobble in either wheel. Untrue wheels are slow, uncomfortable and just suck!!

  21. #21
    Me talk pretty one day. eyefloater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captsven
    The tool that might cost a lot now but pay for itself in the long term is a truing stand. If you think you will be riding bikes for the rest of your life, get a truing stand now. This is one tool I wish I would have bought 20 years ago. I have had one for four years (due to the feedback from this forum) and it is awesome.

    I am guessing a good portion of the riders on this forum have anywhere from a slight to moderate wobble in either wheel. Untrue wheels are slow, uncomfortable and just suck!!
    Plus the fact that building wheels is one of, if not the most enjoyable thing to work on with a bike. I brought a TS-2 home from the shop for a few weeks and worked on wheels every evening. Learned a huge amount since I could focus on it for hours at a time and ended up with some great wheels of my own.

  22. #22
    Me talk pretty one day. eyefloater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hyperRevue
    I'll make you a pair out of a nice craftsman channel-lock for a fraction of the price.
    Have you done this before? Seems possible if you're good w/ an angle grinder/metal file.

  23. #23
    Honking drivers see you noriel's Avatar
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    I've seen a pic of the custom job before... I need to learn how to make one, myself. Hey, I like being as self reliant as I can. LBS's aren't always open when you want them to be, and some people only have one bike.
    Noriel
    ----------------
    Geared-->SS-->Fixie.
    Somewhere between I got a dual slalom and mod trials bike.
    I think I'm through with derailleurs.
    I guess uni's are my next step.

  24. #24
    sh!thead on dynamite BEARPAW!!!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbertfixy
    i'm sorry, i think this is really poor advice. that's like saying "don't learn to cook, support your local chef."
    exactly.
    thanks for all the input, i'm really looking forward to taking a much more hands-on approach to working on bikes than i have in the past - as other posters have previously said, the lbs isnt always open, and to depend on someone else to do something that you can do yrself with a little initiative and a little patience seems foolish in this day & age.

  25. #25
    King Among Runaways hyperRevue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyefloater
    Have you done this before? Seems possible if you're good w/ an angle grinder/metal file.

    I have. Best tool I own.
    I just used a nice file and about 20 minutes later, voila.
    I'm not especially skilled with a file, either.
    "I owe everyone an apology" - hyperrevue

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