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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 09-25-06, 03:00 PM   #1
seaneee
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Hubs... 32 or 36?

So I'm starting to look into building or rather having a wheelset built and I want to know the difference between 32 and 36 hole hubs (other than the obvious of one has more spokes). What's the advantage, or is it just because of different rim styles? Thanks.
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Old 09-25-06, 03:05 PM   #2
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28 28 28 28 28.
They're great.
28.
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Old 09-25-06, 03:11 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by seaneee
So I'm starting to look into building or rather having a wheelset built and I want to know the difference between 32 and 36 hole hubs (other than the obvious of one has more spokes). What's the advantage, or is it just because of different rim styles? Thanks.
I'm interested in the same question because I'm considering building a singlespeed, and I'd like to know other peoples opinions on 32h vs. 36h for someone my size (at 6'6", 260 pounds I put some hurt on a wheel.)
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Old 09-25-06, 03:14 PM   #4
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32 for riding and 36 for jumping
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Old 09-25-06, 03:15 PM   #5
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There really isn't much to choose between them. The new standard is more 32 hole, while older equipment and more durable stuff tends to be 36. Depending on how much you weigh, where you ride and how you ride, 28 might or might not be doable, but the weight difference in 4 spokes is pretty negligible anyway and if the point is to be able to ride and not walk home (and then have to fork out money for new rims), I'd suggest you go either 32 or 36. You can get more current choices readily in 32 (36's tend to be available but are sometimes special orders) but you can find a lot of older equipment in 36 and much of it tends to be cheaper (it's either quite cheap or highly collectible and thus very expensive; you'll quickly figure out which if you watch eBay for a few days).

If you want to be NJS, you have to be 36 because 32 isn't certified. If you want that extra bit of durability, 36 isn't a bad way to go. You can make any wheel pretty bling, but some folks like low spoke count on fixies because you get a few extra bling points up front. Don't be conned by the low spoke counts used in racing road or track -- those are with deep-profile carbon rims, special spokes, special hubs, and designs that you can't duplicate in a wheel you're building yourself.
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Old 09-25-06, 04:50 PM   #6
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And for the heavier crowd/anyone who rides the **** outta wheels: go for double-butted spokes.
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Old 09-25-06, 05:53 PM   #7
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I found this article on the subject very interesting
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Old 09-25-06, 08:50 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by mrwhite
28 28 28 28 28.
They're great.
28.
so what would you think about 28?
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Old 09-25-06, 09:56 PM   #9
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I found this article on the subject very interesting
That was a good article. I liked the comparison of 36 1.8/1.5 spokes being lighter than 32 2.0/1.5 spokes. Luckily I'm a scrawny guy (135) so the option would still be there to go 28/28 2.0/1.5 for a wheelset and still end up w/ a stupidly light wheelset. It was certainly an interesting read as far as theory goes.
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Old 09-25-06, 10:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyefloater
That was a good article. I liked the comparison of 36 1.8/1.5 spokes being lighter than 32 2.0/1.5 spokes. Luckily I'm a scrawny guy (135) so the option would still be there to go 28/28 2.0/1.5 for a wheelset and still end up w/ a stupidly light wheelset. It was certainly an interesting read as far as theory goes.
yeah, using more spokes and a lighter rim is more effective than the converse. however, i think the point is meant to apply to the tubular crowd, since the rims range from around 400g to 280g and below. standalone clincher rims that are sub 400g are far and few between. that said, i suspect that the benefits of using 4 or 8 less spokes and/or a radial lacing on a 500g+ rim like a deep v are negligible, other than aesthetic. i wouldn't be suprised if this were the same case for the lower weight range of clinchers as well.
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