Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-21-07, 10:11 PM   #1
davidmcowan
Live Deliberately.
Thread Starter
 
davidmcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Denver
Bikes: CETMA Cargo, Xtracycle Edgerunner, Surly Crosscheck, Giant Trance, Salsa Mukluk 3
Posts: 713
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Will it get better?

Background: I've been riding 42x16 for about a year on 27 inch, thicker tires on old heavier wheels. I recently purchased a new wheel set (700c and MUCH lighter and thinner). I decided that I should buy a 15t cog because 16 had gotten so I was spinning more than I would like to and couldn't get past a certain speed. So I've switched out the wheel set and I'm riding this gear and it feels like I'm pushing really hard up hills and from starts. My question is: How long should I expect this transition to last? Will it get better? Will my legs get stronger, is this a gear I should be able to run in a hilly neighborhood?

You are smarter than I am. Tell me.
davidmcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-07, 10:19 PM   #2
TimArchy
Senior Member
 
TimArchy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Atlanta
Bikes: Zeus (Razesa) tarck, Giant TCR road, Eddy Merckx road, Fuji Touring Series IV for everything else
Posts: 1,155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
your legs will get stronger. It does take time to adjust to a new ratio. Will it get easier?
Greg LeMond said it best:
"It never gets any easier, you just go faster"
TimArchy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-07, 10:20 PM   #3
koyman
Good for Business
 
koyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Madison
Bikes: Team Fooj
Posts: 853
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
yes.
koyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 05:59 AM   #4
stevo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmcowan
So I've switched out the wheel set and I'm riding this gear and it feels like I'm pushing really hard up hills and from starts.
well, are you pushing harder to maintain your usual time, or are you pushing harder and making better time? Folk often subconsciencely push harder when they get new parts or a lighter bike.

regardless, the latest WC research indicates that heavier wheels may actually make climbing easier!
stevo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 06:08 AM   #5
dutret
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: GA
Bikes:
Posts: 5,317
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A week or so. If you feel like you are having to push too hard up hills gear back down. In the long term improving your ability to spin will make you a better cyclist then improving your strength some. It also is much less likely to injure you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo
regardless, the latest WC research indicates that heavier wheels may actually make climbing easier!
link? this is something I have hypothesized for years.
dutret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 07:31 AM   #6
davidmcowan
Live Deliberately.
Thread Starter
 
davidmcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Denver
Bikes: CETMA Cargo, Xtracycle Edgerunner, Surly Crosscheck, Giant Trance, Salsa Mukluk 3
Posts: 713
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo
well, are you pushing harder to maintain your usual time, or are you pushing harder and making better time? Folk often subconsciencely push harder when they get new parts or a lighter bike.

regardless, the latest WC research indicates that heavier wheels may actually make climbing easier!
Oh, I'm going much faster. I'd like to install a computer to know but it feels like 2-3 miles per hour faster on a regular flat. The thing is I need to spin up to a certain speed (on flats) before it gets close to the same exertion I'd apply on flats. I think this is because it is harder to push that I need to pick up some speed to not be mashing.

I'd be interested in the wheel theory. I used to cruise up hills and now it seems a little slower and more difficult. I hope this changes, as this speed is much more my speed.
davidmcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 07:36 AM   #7
TimArchy
Senior Member
 
TimArchy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Atlanta
Bikes: Zeus (Razesa) tarck, Giant TCR road, Eddy Merckx road, Fuji Touring Series IV for everything else
Posts: 1,155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo
the latest WC research indicates that heavier wheels may actually make climbing easier!
I haven't heard that theory. Is it something to do with a fly-wheel affect? There is a lot of cycling experience out there that says the opposite, but the world of cycling have been known to be wrong on many occations.
TimArchy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 07:45 AM   #8
dutret
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: GA
Bikes:
Posts: 5,317
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimArchy
I haven't heard that theory. Is it something to do with a fly-wheel affect? There is a lot of cycling experience out there that says the opposite, but the world of cycling have been known to be wrong on many occations.
well, total weight matters on a climb I don't think anyone will deny that.

However, rotational weight climbing at a steady speed is completely meaningless. Rotational weight while accelerating on a climb is much much less important then rotational weight while accelerating on flats since the speeds are substantially lower.

Therefore it seems like at the least wheel weight is not very important for climbing. Since the flywheel effect seems to be useful in some tt situations it also seems likely that a bike with heavy wheels would be a better climber then a bike that weighed the same amount but with light wheels.

Weight weenies really hate to hear this.
dutret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 08:32 AM   #9
Mueslix
Senior Member
 
Mueslix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: SuckaFree City
Bikes: chopper, Team Fuji, Velo Orange Polyvalent
Posts: 338
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You also end up going faster because your spinning propels you farther.
Mueslix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 08:45 AM   #10
I Like Peeing
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Philadelphia
Bikes: 1985 Pinarello Catena Lusso / 1983 Pinarello Montello / Raleigh Marathon / Camel Cigarettes conversion / 1957 Worksman cruiser / Puch 140 / Raleigh Grand Prix
Posts: 849
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm curious to see if I'll notice any difference between Aeroheads (405g) to some Deep Vs (520g) I'm about to lace up. My guess is no, but I'm confident they will be more durable, and that's the main concern for Philly roads.
I Like Peeing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 12:47 PM   #11
captsven
Spawn of Satan
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have you tried the new wheelset with the 16T or did you go right to the 15T?

I would put a computer on and get an average speed from both sets of wheels om the same course. Then convert the speed to cadence based on the gearing. That will tell you your average cadence for the ride.
captsven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 02:44 PM   #12
davidmcowan
Live Deliberately.
Thread Starter
 
davidmcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Denver
Bikes: CETMA Cargo, Xtracycle Edgerunner, Surly Crosscheck, Giant Trance, Salsa Mukluk 3
Posts: 713
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I went straight to 15t but I did it because the 16t on the old wheelset was getting to the point where I was spinning TOO MUCH on the flats and I didn't want to buy two seperate cogs. (my old wheelset still has the 16t loctite/jbwelded on.
davidmcowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 09:30 PM   #13
iamarapgod
via hiptop
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: youngstown, oh
Bikes: wooden lightning, cyclepro conversion, varsity beater, nishiki conversion, fuji conversion
Posts: 321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mueslix
You also end up going faster because your spinning propels you farther.
That doesn't sound right...weight isn't gonna change your wheels circumfrence
iamarapgod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-07, 10:17 PM   #14
scott77
pavement+face=<3
 
scott77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: san francisco
Bikes: heavy ****ty haro bmx, mercier kilo tt
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
distance != velocity anyway !
scott77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-07, 05:16 AM   #15
stevo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 997
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dutret
A week or so. If you feel like you are having to push too hard up hills gear back down. In the long term improving your ability to spin will make you a better cyclist then improving your strength some. It also is much less likely to injure you.



link? this is something I have hypothesized for years.
WC = Walnut Creek; subtle reference to RBW, RR#39. Very unscientific observation of a potential flywheel effect.
stevo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-07, 05:22 AM   #16
dutret
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: GA
Bikes:
Posts: 5,317
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo
WC = Walnut Creek; subtle reference to RBW, RR#39. Very unscientific observation of a potential flywheel effect.

ohhh that's too bad.
dutret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-07, 05:46 AM   #17
captsven
Spawn of Satan
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You have lighter wheels and a bigger gear. You are going to go faster on the flats and short bursts. If you want too climb fast, or increase your speed over a longer distance with a variety of terrain then the lower gearing MAY be the answer. You should experiment and get a bike computer to get some hard data.

I see you live in Denver. From my experience, if you are considering two gears for hills, go with the lower one.
captsven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-07, 08:38 AM   #18
Mueslix
Senior Member
 
Mueslix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: SuckaFree City
Bikes: chopper, Team Fuji, Velo Orange Polyvalent
Posts: 338
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm saying, because he is spinning a bigger gear, he ends up pushing himself farther with one revolution than he did before. So it will take him less time to pedal the same distances, though it will also take more effort.
Mueslix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:45 PM.