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  1. #1
    RFC
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    My next dumb conversion question: removing the cassette

    Sorry for all of the stupid questions. I am converting a 1980 Lotus Elan to singlespeed. The cassette removal and replacement is the only part I don't understand. It appears to have a thread-on freewheel. Do I remove the freewheel or just the cogs so I can put spacers in place? What tools will I need?

    Any advice will be much appreciated.

    Thanks

    RFC

  2. #2
    . bbattle's Avatar
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    Check this out

    As for the spacers, go HERE and HERE

  3. #3
    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    you have to remove the entire freewheel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  4. #4
    tad
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbattle View Post
    Check this out

    As for the spacers, go HERE and HERE
    It sounds like he has a freewheel, not a freehub.

    If you have a thread on freewheel, you're not going to be able to use the spacer kit. (The spacers slide onto a splined freehub (which normally accepts a multi-speed cassette), and allow you to use a splined single cog).

    Actually, it's even easier. You just need to get a single speed freewheel like this one: http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking...FWBMXDC/FW1202
    It threads directly on in place of your old multi-speed freewheel. To remove the freewheel, you will need a special tool that fits into the core of the freewheel and allows you to unscrew it (usually by turning the wheel). See this page for more info about removal: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html
    If you don't have the tool, just take it your LBS and they'll remove it for a few bucks (mine charged $3 - I had the tool, but I didn't have a vice, and I could get it off with a wrench).

  5. #5
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    I've never been clear on this, if you just take off the freewheel and thread on a ss freewheel, how do you correct the chainline? Different spindle length?

  6. #6
    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by streetlightpoet View Post
    I've never been clear on this, if you just take off the freewheel and thread on a ss freewheel, how do you correct the chainline? Different spindle length?
    you move spacers from one side of the axle to the other. that's where washers come in handy, since you can move a couple at a time til the chain's straight.

    then you need to redish the wheel's spokes so the rim is centered again.

    does nobody read sheldon anymore?
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  7. #7
    i'd leave the sweet stuff joshuastar's Avatar
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    when i first read sheldon's "respace/redish" article i was still confused. actually, the first ten times i read it i was still confused.

    it took a friend working with me for me to really understand what it meant.

    hands on all the way.

    the axle stays the same length, you just rearrange the spacers (or washers) from one side of the axle to the other until you get the hub in the right spot. it helps to have a bowl of washers and spacers of differing widths that you can use, trial-and-error fashion.

    after you get the hub in the right spot, you have to work on getting the rim in the right spot.

    if the rim needs to move to the right, loosen the spokes on the left a half-turn and then tighten the ones on the right a half-turn. check it, and if it still needs to come over, do it again.

    the closer you get to it being correctly dished, only make quarter turns, and then half-quarter (?!) turns.

    and then you'll feel amazing because you made it.


    [edit: i just realized that re-spacing a wheel is alot like balancing an equation in algebra. the hub is the equal sign. x+1=y. solve for x!]
    BCA vista sis | 2007 BFSSFG IRO

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