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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 12-09-07, 04:11 PM   #1
decline
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How To Polish a Nitto Jaguar Stem?

I just got a new Nitto Jaguar Stem and i am interested in polishing it so that its shiny, i saw a thread on polishing an old stem but i don't know if it apply's to the nitto stems, can anyone suggest
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Old 12-09-07, 04:15 PM   #2
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Do It Yourself (DIY)
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Old 12-09-07, 05:36 PM   #3
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that link is golden.
i actually did the same thing to a pair of cranks. i used cardboard and a rag to buff them with some mother's mag polish.

the only thing i wish i hadn't done was clear coat them. i was reading in a thread on here a while back about polishing parts and people were suggesting to clear coat if you lived around a salty/humid area (in this case savannah). well, a few months of riding later my clear coat began to crack and flake off. i ended up scraping it all off with a credit card and they have been looking fine ever since. you may have to do a quick once over with the polish and rag every now and then to keep it looking oh so fresh.
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Old 12-09-07, 06:04 PM   #4
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You cant just clear over bare aluminum. you would have to use some kind of self etching primer. other wise it wont adhere and flake like you said. sucks. it would be nice.
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Old 12-09-07, 06:07 PM   #5
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Someone in another thread said that oven cleaner doesn't work for a black shot-peened finish, but will it work on parts that are anodized or painted black?
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Old 12-09-07, 06:32 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by mikebern View Post
You cant just clear over bare aluminum. you would have to use some kind of self etching primer. other wise it wont adhere and flake like you said. sucks. it would be nice.
There are some fancy (i.e. $$$) automotive products for finishing/protecting polished aluminum, like Zoop Seal. It does the job, but then again, so does an occasional touch-up polish.
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Old 12-09-07, 06:40 PM   #7
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Someone in another thread said that oven cleaner doesn't work for a black shot-peened finish, but will it work on parts that are anodized or painted black?
You have to leave it on there a little longer, and it may take one or two applications, but it works to remove black anodization as well.
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Old 12-09-07, 07:57 PM   #8
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You need:

1) Nitto NJS stem polishing kit #573 (Jaguar specific, don't mix and match stems and polish)
2) 1 Liter deionized water.
3) 1 roll shop rags.

Instructions come with the kit.
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Old 12-09-07, 08:10 PM   #9
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^Hehe..

is the Jaguar anodized? If so, you might have luck polishing out some really shallow scratches in the ano layer, but if there's anything deep, you wouldn't be able to spot-polish them out. You would need to strip off all the ano because bare aluminum and ano don't polish the same.. believe me, I've tried. I've polished two seatposts and a crappy stem in the same way the guy in the link did, and they didn't turn out quite as nice as his. Then again, I didn't use any buffing compound and I did use some off brand metal polish, so that might be it. Very satisfied though.

If you do end up doing this, be sure to reapply metal polish every so often.. bare aluminum requires much more care than anodized aluminum (and it's more susceptible to scratches).
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