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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 03-10-08, 01:33 PM   #1
neather18t
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another fixed gear build

(Noob content)
i have made the decision on a fixed gear bike. the frame was given to me.
i went to the local shop to ask some questions and got some great information. i plan on running a flip-flop hub and temporarily staying with the current crank, bottom bracket, (etc.). my goal is cheap and safe so not throwing on a fixed cog with locktite (unless recomended otherwise). i currently have come up with some prices from the local shop.
~built wheel by the shop with flipflop hub (including warranty) $125
~700cc front. (due to the fact that my current stock are larger i guess from what he said, which was an educated guess he hadn't seen the bike) $35
~chain size? i have to sprockets on the crank. inside i have a 43t and outside i have 52t. from my understanding because they are not riveted (they have allen heads) i can run either the 43t or the 52t which do i run and what chain size should i run. i been checking out sheldon's stuff as well. if anyone can include any information or stuff to consider that would be great.

~thanks in advance
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Old 03-10-08, 01:42 PM   #2
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If you are using the current bottom bracket and cranks, you will want to put the chain ring on the inside of the spider to get a good chain line. You may not have enough clearance to put the large chain ring there. If you are planning to ditch the other chainring, you will need new single speed bolts as well.

The prices for the wheels sound reasonable, assuming they are not using junk parts, but you can get cheaper setups online through the mail. Remember to add in the price of tires, tubes, cog, and lockring to your wheel budget.

Your chain rings will be for 3/32 chain, if you use this, make sure to get a 3/32 cog. You can use a 1/8 chain with either 1/8 or 3/32 cogs and chain rings, so that might be a more versatile solution.

EDIT: Welcome to BikeForums
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Old 03-10-08, 01:42 PM   #3
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what size cog will you be running in the back?

also i prefer a 1/8th chain but thats personal preference
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Old 03-10-08, 01:44 PM   #4
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what size cog in the back will you be running
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Old 03-10-08, 02:00 PM   #5
neather18t
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not sure as to what size cog to run. so i will run the 43t sprocket up front what size cog in the back. any good websites for built wheels since i do not know how to lace one up? also is there a place to check what posts i have made to see if there is a reply so i don't have to find the post. back on topic! thanks for the advice.
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Old 03-10-08, 02:26 PM   #6
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you could try ebay, wheel and sprocket seems to be a good place. You can find cheaper track wheelsets on ebay for around the $125 range with tubes/tires.. but wheelsets are probably not the place to skimp on your build..

A 16t cog should be a good size to use with your 43t chainring. Depending on how hilly your area is, you could go with a 17t cog.
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Old 03-10-08, 03:15 PM   #7
Abe Froman
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Since you mentioned it...Sometimes cheap bikes have allen head rivets holding chainrings onto the spiders. You may want to actually put a tool on it and see for sure that they are in fact not rivets posing as allen bolts.
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Old 03-10-08, 03:26 PM   #8
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i like the idea of the flip-flop hub incase i want to coast. would this set up work? http://wheelandsprocket.com/itemdeta...gId=39&id=8236 or this http://wheelandsprocket.com/itemdeta...gId=39&id=8235
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Old 03-10-08, 03:50 PM   #9
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The first set of wheels have tubular rims. Really really nice if you ever get a chance to try them, but you need special tires that have to be glued on to the rim, as there is no 'edge' to hold the tire. They are also much more expensive (tires) and arent that easy to patch if you get a flat.

I suggest something like this: http://wheelandsprocket.com/itemdeta...gId=39&id=7123 since they have machined sidewalls on the rims, so you wont mess up the finish by running a brake.
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Old 03-10-08, 05:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beethaniel View Post
The first set of wheels have tubular rims. Really really nice if you ever get a chance to try them, but you need special tires that have to be glued on to the rim, as there is no 'edge' to hold the tire. They are also much more expensive (tires) and arent that easy to patch if you get a flat.

I suggest something like this: http://wheelandsprocket.com/itemdeta...gId=39&id=7123 since they have machined sidewalls on the rims, so you wont mess up the finish by running a brake.
I agree.. looks like a decent wheelset to start with.
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