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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 03-15-08, 01:45 AM   #1
nocash
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lock ring glue

i was wondering a good glue to hold your lockring and make sure it doesnt come off. i was talking to a friend and he recommened some hardware store brand glue. he said it was blue. any ideas?
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Old 03-15-08, 01:47 AM   #2
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blue loctite?

its the semi-permanent thread locker. dont use red unless you want to take fire to your hub to get your lockring off.
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Old 03-15-08, 01:49 AM   #3
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do they usually sell that at hardware stores?
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Old 03-15-08, 02:26 AM   #4
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Why do you need to glue your lockring in the first place?
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Old 03-15-08, 02:31 AM   #5
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spring break! 1938!
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Old 03-15-08, 04:21 AM   #6
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You shouldnt have to glue a lockring...just tighten it on, with a lockring spanner, and you should be good.
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Old 03-15-08, 04:58 AM   #7
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just don't do it.
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Old 03-15-08, 07:40 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by nocash View Post
i was wondering a good glue to hold your lockring and make sure it doesnt come off. i was talking to a friend and he recommened some hardware store brand glue. he said it was blue. any ideas?
If your using an old bottom bracket lock ring instead of a proper rear cog lockring, then blue loctite is not a bad idea. I have also heard that some cheaper lock rings will work themselves loose over time, so maybe some loctite is not a bad idea there either. A good lockring will not require anything but some good leverage and a decent spanner.
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Old 03-15-08, 09:25 AM   #9
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If your using an old bottom bracket lock ring instead of a proper rear cog lockring, then blue loctite is not a bad idea. I have also heard that some cheaper lock rings will work themselves loose over time, so maybe some loctite is not a bad idea there either. A good lockring will not require anything but some good leverage and a decent spanner.
if you ROTAFIX the cog on, and then just tighten the lockring down nice and snug, YOU DO NOT NEED ANY DAMN LOCKTITE. you GREASE the threads, not GLUE!

all locktite will do for you is make it so hard to get the thing off, you'll probably fuxor the TINY FRAGILE ALUMINUM THREADS, and then all you'll have is a single speed, till you go get a new hub laced on.

do a search for ROTAFIX, and do that, get a GOOD LOCKRING SPANNER, like the hozan (the park tool is a POS), and then use phil waterproof grease on your threads.

assembled correctly (and assuming it's not a suicide hub!) you do not need to use LOCKTITE of any sort on a fixed gear hub/cog.
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Old 03-15-08, 01:00 PM   #10
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Amen to that.

Only, the Dura-Ace combined chain whip & lockring tool is the best there is.
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Old 03-15-08, 02:29 PM   #11
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You should never glue or loctite your lockrings. On the contrary, I'd recommend fitting with anti-sieze (available at most auto-parts stores) to prevent dissimilar metal electrolytic siezing (aluminum hubs, usually steel lockring). Just make sure you affix the lockring with the correct torque, and readjust as needed after some riding (once the cog has seated).
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Old 03-15-08, 02:41 PM   #12
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elmers.
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Old 03-15-08, 02:47 PM   #13
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you are no doubt correct. it is NOT needed, especially if you rotafix. If you ever want to switch cogs, however, rotafix is not a great idea. seeing that this persons name is "nocash", I assumed on-the-cheap conversion was going on. I've seen on-the-cheap lock rings slowly come loose. (old BB lockrings for example) all i am saying is that it is not a BAD idea. although i agree it is not neccessary. re-read my first respones. PROPER lockring. This means proper hub, left hand threads, etc, etc. If nocash is using a BB lockring on a freehub, loctite will not hurt.

I'm not the only one who doesnt think its a bad idea. Here are a couple folks that agree with me here. notice the second one. I've done a few cheapo conversions, and can surely understand a posible desire for some loctite.
http://www.cicle.org/cicle_content/p...ry.php?id=1572
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixeda.html
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Old 03-15-08, 02:50 PM   #14
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You should never glue or loctite your lockrings. On the contrary, I'd recommend fitting with anti-sieze (available at most auto-parts stores) to prevent dissimilar metal electrolytic siezing (aluminum hubs, usually steel lockring). Just make sure you affix the lockring with the correct torque, and readjust as needed after some riding (once the cog has seated).
It's a big misconception that Loctite will ruin threads and make them impossible to remove. LocTite will perform the same function as anti-sieze. It keeps the dissimilar metals from seizing... and that's what really causes the damage.

There are different strengths of Loctite and using the correct strength assures easy removal. Blue is designed to be removed with hand tools, red is designed to be removed with heat, and green is for assemblies that are not designed to ever come apart again.

I've used blue LocTite for years instead of anti sieze on various hardware. I've never had any problems with siezing or removing hardware.

That being said, I wouldn't use LocTite as the only method of keeping your lockring attached. Rotofix should do it, and there's nothing wrong with using a dab of blue Loctite, but I wouldn't rely on it really holding under force.

Az
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Old 03-15-08, 03:13 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Az B View Post
It's a big misconception that Loctite will ruin threads and make them impossible to remove. LocTite will perform the same function as anti-sieze. It keeps the dissimilar metals from seizing... and that's what really causes the damage.

There are different strengths of Loctite and using the correct strength assures easy removal. Blue is designed to be removed with hand tools, red is designed to be removed with heat, and green is for assemblies that are not designed to ever come apart again.

I've used blue LocTite for years instead of anti sieze on various hardware. I've never had any problems with siezing or removing hardware.

That being said, I wouldn't use LocTite as the only method of keeping your lockring attached. Rotofix should do it, and there's nothing wrong with using a dab of blue Loctite, but I wouldn't rely on it really holding under force.

Az
+1

Loads of misinformation in this thread. Typical SSFG.
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Old 03-15-08, 03:40 PM   #16
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+1

Loads of misinformation in this thread. Typical SSFG.
The question in the OP was answered in the very first reply. wild stuff around here!
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Old 03-15-08, 10:49 PM   #17
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Nowhere in my post did I indicate that loctite will "ruin ruin threads and make them impossible to remove [sic]" and indeed, if you use the correct grade of loctite, it will not have deleterious effects. My simple point, expanding on what others have said, is that loctite in this particular context is not only unnecessary, but in fact not the correct compound to apply in the first place. Perhaps it's a matter of taste, and I may be more of a purist than many, but I believe in the right tool for the job, so to speak. Although loctite may have some features in common with antisieze, it is by no means equivalent to proper antisieze in all respects, nor is what it is designed to do necessary in this particular application, assuming the applier is even slightly mechanically competent and diligent. "loads of misinformation" is routinely prevented by accurate reading.
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Old 03-17-08, 11:59 PM   #18
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thanks for the advice. i rotafixed it. bought the lock ring tool hooked it up. no glue. took my first ride around pittsburgh today and had a awesome time. thanks everyone
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Old 03-18-08, 07:34 AM   #19
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+1

Loads of misinformation in this thread. Typical SSFG.
here, call these guys and tell them that loc-tite is a good idea on track type rear lockring threads
http://www.shawscycles.com/mission.html
I'm sure they'll agree about the misinformation.

you all have obviously been working on machines for about 30 minutes,....
so if there's NO REASON, or NEED to use loctite on the lockring threads,.....

WHY USE IT?

I agree loctite has it's applications, like on a harley, or a 67 mustang with lopey idleing hot cam, or at the dragstrip, or bonneville, but I don't need it on a bicycle.
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