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  1. #1
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    Troubleshoot on what perhaps could be an unlocked lockring?

    My fixed bike has 1/5 of "freewheel" pedal rotation, meaning that i can pedal for a good 1/5 of a rotation without the rear wheel mooving. It has happened a couple of times. first time my local track bike shop fixed the problem, and now it has opened again. It has been provoked open, I believe, from trying to skid.

    Did the lock ring unlock, whatever that means? Or the sprocket? How tight will I have to make these to prevent it from happening again?

  2. #2
    Cornucopia of Awesomeness baxtefer's Avatar
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    you probably stripped your hub - by trying to skid with a loose cog and a lockring that wasn't torqued down properly.
    time for a new hub...
    {o,o**
    |)__)
    -"-"-

    O RLY?

  3. #3
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    But but..... It was a brand new rear wheel?

  4. #4
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Remove the cog and look at the threads. If you are luck it just unthreaded a bit with no damage. More likely baxtefer is right.

  5. #5
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    What happens tykstil is this: The shop installs the cog with a regular chainwhip, and they get it pretty tight. Next they install a lockring to the correct tightness. The problem is, your pedalling the bike up a big hill puts more force on the cog than a chainwhip can. So, when you get to the top of the hill, now the cog is tighter. but that makes it farther away from the lockring. So, your lockring has effectively loosened. Next time you exert backwards pressure on the pedals, say by skidding, the cog may spin away from the hub and slam into the lockring. After that, a hard acceleration will spin the cog the other way, slamming it into the hub. This back and forth violence will quickly strip threads.

    Your local shop may be to blame for what happened but it's hard for me to say based only on your description.

    If your hub is ****ed, that sucks but you arent the first person that this has happened to. The way to prevent its happening in the future is to get a lockring tool, mash up a hill, and tighten your lockring but good at the top. (No, you don't need a chainwhip for this). Your cog will now be as tight as it can get, and secured in place by the lockring.

  6. #6
    matters cryptozoological
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    mander said it best. could be a loose lockring, in which case you just re-tighten it. however before you do, also take off the lockring and cog and check the hub threads to make sure they're not stripped.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mander View Post
    What happens tykstil is this: The shop installs the cog with a regular chainwhip, and they get it pretty tight. Next they install a lockring to the correct tightness. The problem is, your pedalling the bike up a big hill puts more force on the cog than a chainwhip can. So, when you get to the top of the hill, now the cog is tighter. but that makes it farther away from the lockring. So, your lockring has effectively loosened. Next time you exert backwards pressure on the pedals, say by skidding, the cog may spin away from the hub and slam into the lockring. After that, a hard acceleration will spin the cog the other way, slamming it into the hub. This back and forth violence will quickly strip threads.

    Your local shop may be to blame for what happened but it's hard for me to say based only on your description.

    If your hub is ****ed, that sucks but you arent the first person that this has happened to. The way to prevent its happening in the future is to get a lockring tool, mash up a hill, and tighten your lockring but good at the top. (No, you don't need a chainwhip for this). Your cog will now be as tight as it can get, and secured in place by the lockring.
    Wow thanks. This must be exactly what happened. Interesting that one can apply more torque with ones feet than with a chainwhip, but seems my wheel is okay, and my lockring and cog now feels super tight!

    Thankyou!

  8. #8
    stay free. frankstoneline's Avatar
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    assess damages, then rotafix your cog on if the threads are still rideable and torque the lockring on. Ride it and carry a lockring spanner with you checking periodically at the top of a couple good hills and you are gold.
    xoxo David
    Quote Originally Posted by metaljim View Post
    katana's out frank! always be ready.
    <edited>

  9. #9
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  10. #10
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Never trust a shop or mechanic that does not specialize in fixed gears to install a cog and lockring because they have absolutely no idea how tight the cog and lockring really need to be.

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