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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 04-18-08, 01:23 AM   #1
SuperMario5459
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Is weight a consideration for fixies?

Hey everyone, I'm in the market for a fixed-gear bike. I'm new to this forum so I've been living in the stickied posts but was unable to find anything pertaining to the weight of fixies. I assumed that most people customize theirs but what about off the peg bikes like the LeMond Fillmore? It's been a toss-up between the Fillmore and the (gasp) Langster so I'd be interesting in the weights of both.
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Old 04-18-08, 01:28 AM   #2
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langster are like 19lbs. or something stock. the fillmore probably a little more given it's steel. all in all, cutting the weight down on a fixed gear is easy because there aren't a lot of parts.

langsters aren't bad in my opinion. the city editions are lame to me, but the regular ones can be cool, given the right build.
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Old 04-18-08, 01:34 AM   #3
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imo the weight on a fixed gear isnt really that important
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Old 04-18-08, 02:09 AM   #4
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i welcome weight! ME LOVES TEH INERTIA


until im climbing, then i f'in hate it
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Old 04-18-08, 02:27 AM   #5
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weight matters in climbing and sprinting

if you concern yourself with such particulars then

weight matters
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Old 04-18-08, 03:42 AM   #6
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what ae these things people are calling fixies?
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Old 04-18-08, 05:46 AM   #7
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dunno but it annoys the heck out of me

especially when someone says it in real life
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Old 04-18-08, 06:04 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by nelzar13 View Post
what ae these things people are calling fixies?
It's a refurbished bike that has undergone some type of previous repair. Whatever the
problem was has been "fixed", and the endearing term "fixie" is used by people who
enjoy these types of bikes.
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Old 04-18-08, 06:08 AM   #9
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Anything under 20lb is great (I've been riding for several years and the lightest bike I've ever had was 19lb). If you want to spend a few hundred extra, you can get most stock frames down to 16lb or so. But unless you're racing, it probably won't matter much. The fit of the bike will be much more important so I'd say make he decision by riding them. My best climbing frame was also my heaviest at close to 22lb.
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Old 04-18-08, 06:22 AM   #10
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So you're faster uphills with a heavier frame, compared to a lighter frame?

amazing
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Old 04-18-08, 06:35 AM   #11
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I have no idea about the weight of the bikes, but the difference can't be more than a couple lbs. Your water weight probably fluctuates more than that through the day. If you can't decide between them and they are from different shops, go with the bike shop that you like better.
PS I'd get the LeMond, those may be real hard to come by in a few months.
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Old 04-18-08, 07:37 AM   #12
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Repost;
The primary concern of hip FG riders is a tight geometry and a complete lack of safety features.
Therefore they never worry about the weight of their bike because it could never outweigh the balls it takes to ride it.
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Old 04-18-08, 07:53 AM   #13
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drop a few pounds.

...fatty. =)
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Old 04-18-08, 08:10 AM   #14
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Mass does not like to change speed or direction. Sometimes this is good, sometimes it is bad. As applied to a bike, it is generally bad. Makes it harder to go uphill and harder to accelerate.

Everything else equal, I prefer to haul less mass around with me when I am pedaling. But then, everything else is never equal.

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Old 04-18-08, 08:48 AM   #15
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I have a Pista frame set with very, very light components.

The low inertia wheels and tires help with acceleration and braking.

Otherwise, the lightness just feels good, especially when I lift the rear wheel with my pedal in order to reposition the crank.
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Old 04-18-08, 09:00 AM   #16
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no weight does not matter, unless it matters to you, then yes weight matters. That said. If you think you are too slow, its not the bikes fault
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Old 04-18-08, 09:02 AM   #17
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i have a light bike, a lighter bike and a heavy bike. the light bike (fixed) gets me from point a to b the fastest by far. the heavy bike (also fixed, same ratio), the slowest. this could have something to do with the components and the geometry, but it "feels" heavier when i ride it. it's also a bigger pain in the ass to hang up when i get home.

I also have a harder time sprinting up steeper climbs with it, but it could have something to do with it having risers vs. bullhorns on my other bikes. i almost always end up out of saddle on the larger hills north west of philly when i ride it.
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Old 04-18-08, 11:03 AM   #18
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Does anyone know the weight of the Fillmore off the top of their head?
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Old 04-18-08, 11:08 AM   #19
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My fixed gear is 23 lbs, and it has yet to really be a problem. It could be due to the fact that I'm rocking some road cranks for the added torque, and I'm tall and skinny, giving me some leverage when pedaling.

In fact, I kind of like it at the weight it is right now. I've tried, within reason, to do some weight-dropping upgrades, but I feel really silly sporting some super-lightweight components with an old steel road frame. Plus, it allows me to beat it up on a daily basis without really having to worry.
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Old 04-18-08, 11:37 AM   #20
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I think it depends on your priorities. A lighter bike would be nice, but you may sacrifice money and durability. And for me, I'd rather have a bike I can beat the **** out of and have a slightly harder time climbing with (especially since it's 90% flat here). I don't even know what my bike weighs. I think around 18lbs? But that was me standing on a crappy scale with the bike and guessing.
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Old 04-18-08, 11:40 AM   #21
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As does spOOki, I have a light fixed gear bike and a heavy fixed gear bike; my spring/summer/fall good weather bike and my winter Ice Bike.

I enjoy riding both of them, but I find the light bike much easier to ride, and quicker to climb and accelerate, mostly because of the low mass/inertia of the wheels and tires.

Low inertia matters in climbing because unless the rider has some sort of devinely-given perfect spin, his wheels speed up and slow down with each revolution of the crank, and probably twice with each revolution of the crank.

Therefore, with each revolution of the crank, against gravity, the rider has to re-accelerate his wheels twice per revolution.
This significantly adds to the effort required to climb.

If a person wants to climb easier and accelerate more quickly, he should invest in low-inertia wheels, tubes and tires.
In my mind, money spent on wheels, tubes and tires represents the best money a person can spend on upgrades.

I presently ride on Cane Creek Volos Track wheels with Schwalbe Ultremo tires and Salsa Superlite tubes.
This setup has very low rotational inertia, and it makes a big difference climbing, braking, and accelerating.

In two or three years I plan to build the third and last fixed gear bike I will build in this life.
I would like to have a more conventional wheel set for this future bike.
So far, in my mind, I have chosen Phil low flange hubs with DT Swiss RR 1.1 rims, DT Swiss Aerolite spokes (28 in front, 32 in back), and DT Swiss aluminum nipples (I feel good about the aluminum nipples because the DT Swiss rims have steel eyelets).
This wheel set will weigh 1646 grams, and will have the lowest rotational inertia possible for a wheel having nipples in the rim and yet still capable of carrying my considerable weight (235 all up with bag).

If buying a cheap factory made fixed gear bike, like my Pista, I would, if I had the money, upgrade the wheels as described above and change either the cog, the chain ring, or both, to get the specific gear ratio I know from experience works for me (different gear ratios for different people).
This would double the price of the bike and many people would consider that money poorly spent.
I understand why some people would see it that way.
However, at my point in life I have more money than youth, and so it works for me.
If 18 years-old again, I wouldn't upgrade anything.
I'd just ride and enjoy.
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Old 04-18-08, 11:46 AM   #22
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yes...true oneness begins under 17 pounds.
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Old 04-18-08, 11:52 AM   #23
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I don't believe in weight weenie-ism. IMO, at the cat 6 level most of us ride at, an extra pound or three on your bike will make no appreciable difference to your overall speed compared to how much you train. You don't want a bike that's much heavier than it's got to be for its intended purpose, but it's not worth obsessing over if you're not racing at a fairly high level.
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Old 04-18-08, 12:14 PM   #24
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i built my IRO group buy up with weight in mind, but not necessarily at the top of my list of priorities.

the stock fork alone (which i never put on) weighs more than the frame by itself, so i put a carbon fork on it when i built it up. for only 50 bucks, why wouldn't i?

i also have a carbon brake lever and suzue promax carbon hubs, but--i'm not gonna lie--those were mostly for aesthetics. any weight savings there were just fringe benefit.

weight also played a role in my rim choice--i went with open pros because i knew they'd be light and strong. also because they are not velocity deep v's which was also a major factor.

i havent weighed the bike but it's remarkably light. that is, people lift it and remark on how light it is.

it makes climbing noticeably easier than it was on my panasonic conversion i had prior to this build.
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Old 04-18-08, 12:21 PM   #25
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A lighter bike is nice if you often use it to do hilly long distance rides.
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