Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    ?que? Live2Die's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    783
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Seat post performance?

    I've been riding for a few years now and I have ridden on the cheapest seat post all the way to Campy Record's and I have to say I don't quite understand what the advantage to super "nice" seat posts is. I can't say that I can notice a difference in flex between the posts. I understand weight and different clamp systems but if you are not a huge weight junky then what is the point of upgrading a seat post? Aesthetics aside by the way because to be spending an extra $100 on aesthetics comes much later in a build, I am just talking am I missing a huge performance advantage?

  2. #2
    jack of one or two trades Aeroplane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Suburbia, CT
    My Bikes
    Old-ass gearie hardtail MTB, fix-converted Centurion LeMans commuter, SS hardtail monster MTB
    Posts
    5,635
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Carbon seatposts offer a little more give (supposedly).

    Other than that, you've discounted the varieties of mounting systems, weight, and aesthetics, so that doesn't really leave much to differentiate between posts. Color? I need a silver jammie for my road bike. But that goes back to aesthetics...
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Irwin Goldstein
    Men should never ride bicycles. Riding should be banned and outlawed. It is
    the most irrational form of exercise I could ever bring to discussion.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    1,015
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can say without a doubt that the Thomson posts have weight, strength, and adjustability in spades. I too have riden Record, DA, and cheap Lamprade posts and I can tell you that Thomson posts have the ability to make micro adjustments to angle and stay put. Cannot say the same with any other post. And not all dual bolt posts are created equal. I used to run a Syncros Ti dual bolt post and it was notwhere near as easy to adjust as the Thomson.

    I don't notice much diff in flex either but I do notice when the nose starts to dip, or I can't adjust to the perfect angle.

    I have never ridden a quality carbon post so cannot comment, but I have Thomsons on all my bikes.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Adam777's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for asking this OP, as it is something I have always been curious about. I feel the same way as you, though I don't have as much experience, especially with higher end stuff.

    Hiroshima, you mentioned durability. What does this mean? How does a post wear out? Is it eh clamp fo rht seat? Not trying to be sarcastic. I am Genuinely currious.

  5. #5
    big ring MIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    philadelphia
    Posts
    5,839
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride comfort is determined more by the saddle and how that is designed vs. the flex of a seatpost.
    Last edited by MIN; 04-18-08 at 02:30 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    1,015
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam777 View Post
    Hiroshima, you mentioned durability. What does this mean? How does a post wear out? Is it eh clamp fo rht seat? Not trying to be sarcastic. I am Genuinely currious.
    I have used quite a few posts in my time. DA and Campy stuff works well, but they have small adjustment limitations because of their design. Adustment limitations are worse on cheaper posts. But that is not say that expensive necessarily buys you adjustability or durability. I have broken Syncros posts before because they use Ti adjustment bolts. USE Alien posts have been known to break at the seat clamp area. I have used a cheaper carbon post and had the head come delaminated from the post. I have had old Specialized posts delaminate (same as the carbon post where the head delaminated from the post) I have had old style American Classic posts start to crack at the bottom clamp area (where the positioning pin pushes up on the bottom clamp).

    Thomsons are just bulletproof provided you are not a gorilla with the 4mm allens they use.

    I am not hard on my stuff and don't weigh a lot (150lbs) and was a paid wrench for many years so I know how to turn a screw. The stuff I have broken was due to failure of the part and not the monkey turning the wrench.

    HTH

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    672
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well, i know the thomson i have is great for my brooks because it really does take lots of tilt adjusting to find the prefect tilt. too high, it presses on the tender parts, and too low it induces slippgage..
    http://velospace.org/node/5540

    The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man. Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish. Only the bicycle remains pure in heart. ~Iris Murdoch, The Red and the Green

  8. #8
    Successful alcoholic krusty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    872
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I currently have a Ritchie aluminum post, a Deda BlackStick carbon, a Campy Record carbon, and a USE Alien carbon. I don't really notice much difference between them, even when I swap them around from one bike to another. The seatpost I have that REALLY makes a difference is a Corima Ellipse carbon. When viewed from the front, it is a blade, tapering from 1cm thick at the base to about 5mm at the top. It is really plush. I had to import mine from Worldofbike in Greece (top notch service BTW), as they have been out of production for several years.

    Thomson makes the best value in seatposts at the moment IMHO.

  9. #9
    partly metal, partly real sp00ki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Philadelphia.
    My Bikes
    Hummer H2
    Posts
    3,597
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i've only noticed difference on carbon. you never feel the road through your lower back. then again, the only time i've ridden aluminum seatposts were on crappy bikes, which might account for the buzz more than the seatposts.
    Quote Originally Posted by bonechilling View Post
    Road [racing] is one of the only sports where adult men can compete in a non-scholastic setting, so inevitably 8/10 racers are fiercely-competitive nobodies. It's fun as hell, but it's also the foremost refuge of defeated and aging jocks, turned middle-management types.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Bikes
    Surly CrossCheck, Miyata 310 (conversion)
    Posts
    854
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the really great thing about thomsons also is that they are made from aircraft aluminum, not standard extruded AU
    derailleur? I hardly know her
    http://a2bikegeek.wordpress.com/

  11. #11
    stay free. frankstoneline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ellensburg, WA
    My Bikes
    EAI Bare Knuckle, 1980's Ross Signature 292s 12 speed
    Posts
    1,557
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've heard people comment on the fact that nicer seatposts are stiffer, possibly lending to better power transfer. I've only really ridden on budget-ish setposts, so I have no idea if this holds any merit, anybody have an answer? Like, is it a noticeable difference?
    xoxo David
    Quote Originally Posted by metaljim View Post
    katana's out frank! always be ready.
    <edited>

  12. #12
    Successful alcoholic krusty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    872
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by frankstoneline View Post
    I've heard people comment on the fact that nicer seatposts are stiffer, possibly lending to better power transfer. I've only really ridden on budget-ish setposts, so I have no idea if this holds any merit, anybody have an answer? Like, is it a noticeable difference?
    I'd be surprised, since when you are pedaling hard, the force effectively unweights you from the seat. My Corima post is a noodle side to side when I clamp my bike in a trainer, but on the road, when the bike is free to move back & forth, there is no issue at all. As well, Corima used these posts with their Cougar track frame for many years. A lot of it is marketing, and companies trying to justify changing things year to year by making various claims to get you buying.

  13. #13
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My miche supertype felt much stiffer than the $8 AL post I was using before. Instantly noticed it transmitted road vibrations much more readily into my a$s.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •