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  1. #1
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    Riding a bigger frame size?

    hello. i have an old road bike that has been sitting in my garage that i want to convert to a fixie. its a bit big, making it a little uncomfortable to saddle up. when standing up, the top tube is up against my "crotch". i know it is big, but is it still worth converting? am i supposed to get used to saddling up by putting my weight on the pedals or is it better to look for a smaller frame?

    for those who do ride bigger frames, any tips on saddling up easily?

    also, it is a bike with the gear levers on the downtube...if i take the gear levers off, there would be holes..do people bother to patch them up for a cleaner look?

  2. #2
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    Get a properly fitting frame.

    There won't be holes in the downtube, there will be posts for the shifters.

    Chris

  3. #3
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    is a properly fitting frame that important. dang...i finally find a bike for cheap..well in this case free..with horizontal drops and it ends up being tooo big. how do i roughly tell a frame is appropriate for me? meaning how could i quickly judge the size without calculating and figuring the measurements. i'm i supposed to be able to comfortably stand up and clear the toptube?

    so i see that there are posts, so can i just sand them down?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericlikewhoa View Post
    is a properly fitting frame that important. dang...i finally find a bike for cheap..well in this case free..with horizontal drops and it ends up being tooo big. how do i roughly tell a frame is appropriate for me? meaning how could i quickly judge the size without calculating and figuring the measurements. i'm i supposed to be able to comfortably stand up and clear the toptube?

    so i see that there are posts, so can i just sand them down?

    Fit is important if you're gonna ride it. Just gonna pose with it and lock it outside the coffee shop? Then get it and be happy. Free isn't cheap enough if it doesn't fit.

    Standover is a quick and dirt way to tell if a bike fits, but isn't the only factor. There is also "reach", which is a factor of the top tube length and seat to handlebar drop (also dependent on your flexibility and preferred riding position).

    As for the posts, you're better to cut them or grind them off and use sanding to finish the job.

    Chris

  5. #5
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    thanks for al the help chris. and putting up with my noobness. i decided to go for a properly fitting frame, will be picking up a 55cm univega frame soon!

    now whats next.....HAHAHHAHA

  6. #6
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    Definitely don't waste your time on anything but the perfect fitting frame


    And as far as I'm concerned, if you can saddle up without getting on the pedals, something has gone seriously wrong

  7. #7
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    from measuring the seat stem, th bike seems to be around 58cm. although it is big for me rightnow, is it due to the bigger touring tires that are on it? im going to try to put on the wheelset from by friends univega arrowspeed to see if it will lower it a bit

  8. #8
    No Sidewalks. capolover's Avatar
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    Reach is the important thing.
    Are you over reaching? Does it feel like the bike is in front of you instead of under you?

    If so you can't ride it that often or you'll get sore or put yourself in danger.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by iansmash View Post
    Definitely don't waste your time on anything but the perfect fitting frame
    This is terrible advice. I guess stupid **** like this is the reason why no one with a clue reads this forum anymore.

    Quote Originally Posted by iansmash View Post
    And as far as I'm concerned, if you can saddle up without getting on the pedals, something has gone seriously wrong
    What does this even mean?

    Lots of people squeeze onto frames of all sizes. I am 5'4" and I've ridden a 48 all the way up to a 53 without any problems. Just because the frame doesn't have the requisite modern two feet of seatpost visible of any bike over in the road forum, or the two feet of seatpost showing because some lanky hipster is trying to squeeze onto a 54cm Pista Concept for keirin frame, that doesn't mean that everyone should ride that way. I don't want to get all Grant Peterson on 'ya, but there's nothing wrong with a fistful of seatpost or less.

  10. #10
    Weakling
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    Good luck with your "crotch"!
    I Am Spartacus

  11. #11
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    1. How is it bad advice to tell people to NOT sacrifice when choosing a bike. I think if you're going to buy a bike, you should buy one that's the right size for you. Don't get a bike that's the wrong size because you WANT it...It's like buying a shirt that's too small because you really like it...too bad it won't fit oyu

    I'll be honest, I'm no kind of cycling expert, but I'm just saying that generally if you can get on the saddle with a foot on the ground, you're probably not going to be in a good riding position. Maybe i'm wrong, maybe not.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by iansmash View Post
    I'll be honest, I'm no kind of cycling expert, but I'm just saying that generally if you can get on the saddle with a foot on the ground, you're probably not going to be in a good riding position. Maybe i'm wrong, maybe not.
    I have my saddle raised up according to the rule of thumb that if your heel in on the pedal while pedaling, your leg should be straight. I've also adjusted this a little according to riding experience. From the saddle, I have to bend my ankles completely down to just get the point of my toes to touch the ground, and this is on a conversion with a BB drop of 70. If you're on a bike with a lower BB drop, then it's going to be even harder to touch the ground from the saddle. So, your "rule" is a bit misleading.

    Fitting onto a larger bike was also the fit trend awhile ago, hence the "fistful of seatpost" saying. Now it's all about cramming onto as small of a bike as possible. It's just the trend. A bike a size too small can fit with a longer stem and seatpost and a bike a size too big can fit with a shorter stem and seatpost. As long as the bike is close to your fit you should be fine.

    Also, everyone fits a little different. Telling people that they don't fit their bike over the internet is a bit dishonest. I'm 5'7", and my bike is a 50cm with a 120mm stem, which makes it sound like I probably have the seatpost jacked up, but it's actually only about 5 inches up. Fits me perfectly, and I like the way the bike handles with the longer stem.

    tl;dr version: OP go to a bike shop to get fit, ride a friend's bike, or measure your bod and plug it into a online fit calculator to get an estimate. No one here knows you or has seen you and you're bike. We are guessing at best.

  13. #13
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    I see exactly what you're saying and I agree completely. I think most are just misunderstanding me.


    I don't mean being able to drop a toe and stay afloat whilst saddled up. I mean like, getting from the ground, to the seating position in which you'd ride without getting onto the pedals. I feel like if you can barely drop a toe to stand, then you probably can't saddle up w/o leaving the ground...that or you've got really strong toes

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