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Thread: newb = IRO?

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    newb = IRO?

    Been lurking (last night til 12am searching and looking at all the members rides)....

    I'm a total newbie when it comes to SS/Fixed but plan on going with an IRO.... does anyone have any tips other than consider new tires/tubes and perhaps different pedals?

    Is the bike good out of the box? I plan on riding it 15-20 miles daily or 30-40 round. Anyone else put that amount of mileage on these bikes?

    Cheers!

    This is what I designed...


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    antisocialite dirtyphotons's Avatar
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    at 30-40 miles a day, everyday, i'd personally put on some brake hoods for another hand position. or at least some bar tape.

    others might not, that's ok too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    Because when fashion conflicts with function, I vote for function.

  3. #3
    No Sidewalks. capolover's Avatar
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    I run a cannondale capo about 30 miles a day.

    Its a fun commuter.

    I'd get some form of foot retention even for a single speed.

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    Raving looney
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    I ride between 20 and 30 miles on a usual day - I run a Brooks basic B17, Nitto bullhorns (from IRO) and eggbeaters on my fixed Rob Roy and it works wonderfully... Hand positions/comfort are the concern here, the bike will handle the distance no problem.

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    edw
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    there should be no need to upgrade until anything brakes. That said. Most people change saddle, handlebars and pedals. These are all personal preference / comfort issues.
    30 - 40 miles should be no problem for the bike.
    + 1 on the hoods. I have that combo on my steamroller and it is nice for longer rides

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    Are the hoods better for longer distances? More comfortable?

    I was hoping that this bike is great out of the box, I heard good things about Tony and his products. The only down side is that there is no LSB that offers these; I suppose that is a good thing...

    Thanks for the quick replies.

  7. #7
    FNG Jabba Degrassi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bavarian3 View Post
    Been lurking (last night til 12am searching and looking at all the members rides)....

    I'm a total newbie when it comes to SS/Fixed but plan on going with an IRO.... does anyone have any tips other than consider new tires/tubes and perhaps different pedals?

    Is the bike good out of the box? I plan on riding it 15-20 miles daily or 30-40 round. Anyone else put that amount of mileage on these bikes?

    Cheers!

    This is what I designed...

    I wouldn't spend the extra dough on colored rims. Save it to upgrade parts that you'll actually feel rather than see, like the saddle, pedals, etc.

    Other than that, IROs are kick-ass. If it's a commuter, and city riding will be the norm, consider bullhorns. Also, depending on your local climate, you may want to consider one of their steel models. If you'll be running through salty puddles of battery acid all day, rust becomes a factor, but if your rides are generally grime-free, it will be more comfortable than aluminum.

    If you need aluminum, some people outfit their bikes with carbon fibre bits and pieces to soften up the ride. Usually the seatpost and fork, although CF bars would help reduce vibes transmitted to your hands as well. Just some food for thought.

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    the stock pedals are heavy and the clips are plastic. get a mks setup.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabba Degrassi View Post
    I wouldn't spend the extra dough on colored rims. Save it to upgrade parts that you'll actually feel rather than see, like the saddle, pedals, etc.

    Other than that, IROs are kick-ass. If it's a commuter, and city riding will be the norm, consider bullhorns. Also, depending on your local climate, you may want to consider one of their steel models. If you'll be running through salty puddles of battery acid all day, rust becomes a factor, but if your rides are generally grime-free, it will be more comfortable than aluminum.

    If you need aluminum, some people outfit their bikes with carbon fibre bits and pieces to soften up the ride. Usually the seatpost and fork, although CF bars would help reduce vibes transmitted to your hands as well. Just some food for thought.
    Yeah I saw some posts regarding carbon forks to damper the alum. frame (Jamie Roy). I'm in Florida.... so I think I'll stick with the alum frame.

    Is it worthwhile upgrading to the King headsets?

  10. #10
    hate on bike commies
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    Quote Originally Posted by edw View Post
    there should be no need to upgrade until anything brakes. That said. Most people change saddle, handlebars and pedals. These are all personal preference / comfort issues.
    30 - 40 miles should be no problem for the bike.
    + 1 on the hoods. I have that combo on my steamroller and it is nice for longer rides
    brakes = help your bike stop
    breaks = not something you want your bike to do

    that said, i'm pretty sure your saddle and your handlebars won't break - unless you crash.

  11. #11
    Harbinger xiamsammyx's Avatar
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    not worth upgrading to the king headset, if you're running it fixed dont bother with a rear brake, and the aluminum argument has been run to the ground but i find my jamie roy to have far less road vibration than many steel track bikes due to its geometry, dont be concerned about that. pedals i'd get some mks gr9's with some sort of foot retention, i like the soma double gate toe clips, but you can also do clipless like someone suggested.
    Quote Originally Posted by jmartinez View Post
    I've learned to always take off my wedding ring when polishing my crank.

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