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  1. #1
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    Felt TK2, Fuji Track Pro, or Trek T1 for Road Use

    Hi everyone, I'm a new member but I've been riding fixed gear for about 2 years now. I ride a 58.2cm Specialized Langster with all stock components. Since having this bike I've gotten heavily into fixed gear riding but I do not ride on a velodrome. The closest one is in Pennsylvania and I live in VA, but I ride 20-30 miles 5 times a week on my local city streets. It's very flat where I live so I'm riding a 48/15 and loving it.

    I am really wanting to upgrade to a nicer/lighter/stronger frame or all new bike. I've been looking at the Felt TK2, Fuji Track Pro, or the Trek T1 with a budget of about $1250. I can't tell if these bikes are too track specific to be riding on the street and if I'll run into a great deal of toe overlap (I don't know if the fact that I ride a 58 will remove some of the overlap) Also, I definitely want to have a front brake (not sure if its a good idea to drill into the Fuji's carbon fork! The Trek and Felt are drilled for a front brake already) And is the Trek T1 actually a step above the Langster?

    The only problem is that none of the stores normally stock any of these 3 bikes. You have to special order one which requires a hefty down payment. So I'm going in blind! The felt TK2 looks like the best of the bunch but it might be terrible for road use and I'm really looking to avoid toe overlap because I'm weaving through traffic in the city. But I think I would be happy with any of the bunch.

    I'd really appreciate any thoughts on the matter. Thanks so much!

    Felt TK2:
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/...70da2934_b.jpg

    Fuji Track Pro: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3146/...4e2a7ea0_o.jpg

    Trek T1:
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3117/...425a7769_b.jpg
    Last edited by zwish; 07-22-08 at 05:16 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member NewYorkMantle's Avatar
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    the track pro is one of my favorite aluminum frames, but there is the matter of the undrilled fork in your case.

  3. #3
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    You don't sat where you live but if you can you should travel and actually ride the bikes. It's a pretty big purchase to make blind.

    Really if I were you and this was my only bike and I didn't want overlap I would just keep the langster or get something less trackish and make up weight elsewhere if need be.

  4. #4
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    I know a couple of people who have drilled the fork on a Fuji Track Pro. The steerer tube is aluminum and goes down to the crown (from what I've heard anyway). Your miles may vary though.

    Of those bikes I believe that the Trek has the least toe overlap but I'm not 100% sure.

    Personally I would stick to the Langster for street use. It's probably stronger than the other three bikes as it was built specifically for street use.

  5. #5
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    im riding a 58cm t1 after moving up from a langster as well

    you will immediately feel the difference in the track geometry as compared to the lax geo of the langster. also like someone stated earlier there is no toe overlap for me when i ride the trek.

    testing each bicycle is by far the best way to determine which bike to purchase considering the price tags of each

  6. #6
    No plan. peabodypride's Avatar
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    I have a Track Pro, it's nothing too special in my view. The FSA Track Pro cranks are kind of hit-or-miss and the stock wheelset is meh, plus the paint job is rather insane. Powdercoated it does look pretty though.

  7. #7
    No plan. peabodypride's Avatar
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    Also you can have the fork drilled, it has dimples for a brake hole in the carbon. I'd let someone experienced around carbon with a drill press do it, though.

  8. #8
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    That's disappointing that you didn't find the track pro to be anything special. I was strongly considering that bike. Do you really think that the Trek or the Felt would be much better than the Fuji? Where I'm at now I can find the bikes for these prices.

    Fuji Track Pro: $900
    Trek T1: $1000
    Felt TK2: $1350

    Thanks again for all your help guys!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by imwithhobbes View Post
    im riding a 58cm t1 after moving up from a langster as well

    you will immediately feel the difference in the track geometry as compared to the lax geo of the langster. also like someone stated earlier there is no toe overlap for me when i ride the trek.

    testing each bicycle is by far the best way to determine which bike to purchase considering the price tags of each
    Hey, that's awesome that you did exactly what I'm thinking about doing. What do you mean I will immediately feel the difference in the track geometry. Is that a positive or a negative? And also, is it a big step up from the langster to the T1. I think the bike looks awesome. I'm just concerned about the front wheel having such a few amount of spokes. Thanks so much!

  10. #10
    aka mattio queerpunk's Avatar
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    if i were in your shoes i'd be looking at the cannondale track bike.

    similar frame as the others, but with more middle-of-the-road angles. would make a better all around bike.
    the hipster myth.

    i practice vagabondery.

  11. #11
    NEWSNEAKERHEAD
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    I ride a 58 T1 and have a tiny issue with overlap. I'm running L/XL cages on my pedals aswell. My feet aren't that crazy big either. Size 11. I only really notice when I'm leaving a trackstand at a light or crosswalk. Going slow is where I notice it the most. 90 degree corners on a sidewalk or to a driveway aren't all that fun. I try and skip so my cranks are in a not so awkward position for those type of corners.

    As for ride you'll notice the stiffness right away. My fillings are falling out.........just kidding. You can feel everything through that carbon fork and through the saddle. The stock wheels make tuning fork type sounds under load every once and awhile. Like really powering up a hill overtop of the bars. I've had no issues so far but I'm switching the wheels out soon anways.

    Like the guy said above you'll really notice the geometry. Could be good or bad. I ride a really uncomfortable sportbike so I'm used to sucking it up..... My friend with a Bianchi Fremont hates my bike and constantly asks me why I still ride it? To each their own I guess.

  12. #12
    I LOVE ME A GOOD FOIGHT octopus magic's Avatar
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    Serious answer you don't want to hear: Buy an entry level road bike with 105 components and forget about buying a mid range track bike.

    I have a Track Pro and I do not like using it on the street. It's overly stiff for the road and if you're going to ride it the way it's meant to be ridden (IE: With track drops), you're going to be on the drops and be stuck with a vertical back the whole time. Not fun for streets. But maybe it's because I'm running 51x15 and tubulars.

    If you really wanna do something, put some decent wheels, better saddle, on your current rig (which is more than a decent ride for a commuter/what you're doing with your bike), and save your cash. The Felt/Fuji/Trek really aren't worth it for a street fixie/commuter and won't really be that much of an improvement to justify their price new, although I'm sure everyone else will scream at me for even thinking about that.
    I ride with pants so tight that they're spandex.
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  13. #13
    NEWSNEAKERHEAD
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    I agree. I have since flipped my stem and still don't like it. Running Bullhorns with a neg. stem angle now which is more like the position it was designed for. I guess I thought I knew better than the designers.
    Octopus- He knows what he's talking about. Running risers really puts your weight on your wrists which leads to a bunch of issues.

  14. #14
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    three-way comparison

    i've got a bit of experience with all three of those. i owned a 56cm 2008 track pro, currently own a 54cm 07 tk2, and i've ridden a 56cm '07 T1. my impressions are limited to those specific models.

    build quality: T1 is one of the 'nicely made' bikes from trek. clean welds, good paint and clear. track pro's paint and clear weren't as good; mine had blemishes from the factory, and the welds are big and nasty, even around the HT/DT junction and the SS/ST junction which isn't impossible to do well. fuji's decals are also pretty hideous compared to the other two in my opinion. TK2's matte finish is really slick looking in person, and the welds are nice, although not as nice as the trek's. tubing on the trek feels pretty stout, and on the felt as well. track pro's downtube would flex if you squeezed it as a result of the cross section. nevertheless, all were noticeably stiffer than my (Deda steel) iro, which is obviously influenced by more than just frame design and material.

    geometry/design: track pro has an aero downtube with a straight cross section (it's the same all the way down), while the tk2 and t1 have 'shaped' downtubes, with the t1's being closer to round. all three are integrated design; tk2 and t1 have a gentle curve to the HT to accommodate the bearing cups, while the track pro has a flare out. T1's traditional fastback seatstays are pretty and stiff, as are the dropped stays on the track pro, while the dropped wishbone on the felt is a little more comfortable. i happen to prefer the wishbone from a comfort as well as aesthetic perspective. all three have a hydroformed cutout in the seat tube, as opposed to a welded one. all three will fit a 25c in the back, but a 28 is pushing it— i've run a 28 on the fuji and the felt, but it's pretty tight and won't 'slam' into the fork end for a tight look. chainstays are shorter on the felt (39cm) than the fuji; i seem to remember the T1 being in the middle. top tube slopes slightly on track pro and trek but seems level on the felt. fork ends are longest on the track pro, followed by the trek, followed by the felt— but i believe this is an issue that's been corrected in felt's 2008 model, along with including steel dropout inserts that the other two already have.

    fork rake is 40 on the fuji, 25 on the felt, and something like 28 or 30 on the trek if memory serves. fuji feels nimble/twitchy (more responsive to steering input), while the other two are a bit more stable to rock while sprinting or climbing. they all have a steep head tube angle, though overlap is significantly more pronounced on the tk2— with 170mm cranks (fsa carbon pro) i have about 1.5cm of clearance between the front tire (23c) and the crankarm. T1 has a more normal overlap, and track pro a bit less. this may not be as much of an issue in a 58.
    seat clamp/binder is integral on track pro and looks pretty slick, while T1 and tk2 have a standard replaceable binder— fortunately for me as i cracked my tk2's.

    trek is drilled front and rear. tk2 is drilled front. track pro is not drilled.

    component spec:
    T1: let it be said that i don't much care for bontrager components, which this frameset is completely spec'd with for 07. their version of the truvativ external bearing crankset is heavy, comes with a 3/32 ring mounted on the inside of the spider, and doesn't have very clean pedal threads. part of the weight likely comes from the crankarms not being machined to remove material where it isn't needed. the stem and post are unremarkable. however, the paired-spoke wheelset has decent-looking sealed bearing hubs threaded fixed-free in the rear, with a trick CNC'd screw cover that fits on the side you're not using. rims are semi-aero modified box section, grey with a machined brake track.
    track pro: comes with a deda cockpit, san marco saddle, fsa carbon pro crankset, and an alex/formula wheelset that is fairly light but not terribly pretty. for some reason, the OEM formula hubset is shotpeened and black painted, and bears a formula logo— unlike the retail version with a smooth and glossy black finish, and no logo. front is 32h radial, rear is 32h 2x. rear is fix/fix threaded. headset top cap is a tall-style spacer that's not removable.
    tk2: came to me as a frameset. bearing cap/spacer is a removable 'tall' cap over a low-profile one.

    the ride: track pro was stiff and fairly light. it transmitted a fair amount of road noise and vibration through the frame, more so than the other two. trek t1 was more stout and sturdy feeling, and a little heavier. felt was not quite as stiff as the track pro in the saddle, but felt more solid up front— it feels a bit 'deader' but in a positive way.

    my conclusions: all three are decent framesets. fuji's decal and paint scheme is gaudy and lower quality, while trek's is nicer quality but a bit louder (T1 was metallic red in 07). felt's matte black looks great but they have too many decals IMO, and the quality of the paint isn't as nice as trek's. T1 would have the most pista concept-esque look with a solid powdercoat, while the track pro is definitely its own look. felt is less common and more odd-looking (a plus in my book). either way a powdercoat wouldn't hurt. T1 looks most traditional, while the track pro looks most aggressive, and tk2 is more sculptural. t1's fork has a nice taper to the legs, but the crown is a bit chunky. tk2's is simple and straight bladed. track pro's crown has a strange kink backwards, but the legs are profiled in an S-section which you only notice up close.

    the longer wheelbase of the fuji make it more comfortable for longer rides but less agile in traffic. the tk2 is definitely shorter and tighter. t1 is a nice balance between the two and likely the one i'd pick for ride quality on the road, if i got to use my own build parts.

    for an all-stock ride, i vote 08 felt tk2. for a custom build, but with stock paint, trek t1. for a full custom build including paint or powder, any are fair game depending on which aesthetic you prefer.

  15. #15
    I LOVE ME A GOOD FOIGHT octopus magic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWSNEAKERHEAD View Post
    Octopus- He knows what he's talking about. Running risers really puts your weight on your wrists which leads to a bunch of issues.
    Where the hell did I mention risers?

    Buying a 1200 dollar overly stiff track bike for the purpose of riding in the city when he already has a langster, and is concerned over something (no offense to anyone) pretty trivial like toe overlap (which is to be expected on a track bike anyways, unless you're running too short cranks for your legs) is a pretty poor reason to buy any of those, especially since he's never going to be riding on the track. The only good thing that's going to come out of the bike on the street is that it'll be tighter and twitchier.

    Is that really worth spending so much when other fun things like road bikes are in that price range?
    I ride with pants so tight that they're spandex.
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  16. #16
    NEWSNEAKERHEAD
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    Yeah sorry. Bad sentence structure. I just meant you knew what you were talking about with the geometry. Period.


    I put risers on mine which was a mistake.

  17. #17
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    I hear what you guys are saying about how its trivial to be concerned with toe overlap and that my Langster would be just fine. It's just that I have a potential buyer for it for just about as much as I bought it for and then the Fuji or Trek would only be a little bit more on top of that. And I've gotten much more into riding since I've had the Langster, so I figured I'd treat myself. I would love to get any of these bikes. I just didn't know if it was completely absurd to ride these on the road because I have no way of test riding them and I didn't know if they were all a big step above my current stock Langster. Also, CHASE! Thanks so much for all the info, very informative. Thanks everyone!

  18. #18
    Senior Member patrickgh's Avatar
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    Considering I'm totally ignorant to ANY of the frames you are looking at, I'd just like to throw out a vote for the Felt TK2 (minus the ugly seatpost) for it being sexy as hell.
    Quote Originally Posted by ZiP0082 View Post
    my opinion is more correct than your opinion

  19. #19
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    For street use I'd consider all of those bikes a downgrade from a langster. Those bikes are built for specifically for track racing so you are going to end up with a stiffer, steeper and more fragile frame.

    I have an IRO Mark V and a Raleigh Rush Hour Pro (very similar to the Fuji). I much prefer to ride the IRO on the street. The RHP gives a harsher ride, I'm much more worried about damaging the frame and toe overlap occasionally becomes a problem (only when going real slow through bumper-to-bumper traffic).

  20. #20
    Senior Member chrism32205's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoshi View Post
    For street use I'd consider all of those bikes a downgrade from a langster. Those bikes are built for specifically for track racing so you are going to end up with a stiffer, steeper and more fragile frame.

    I have an IRO Mark V and a Raleigh Rush Hour Pro (very similar to the Fuji). I much prefer to ride the IRO on the street. The RHP gives a harsher ride, I'm much more worried about damaging the frame and toe overlap occasionally becomes a problem (only when going real slow through bumper-to-bumper traffic).
    +1.. I have a 07' langster and a 06' T1.. I dont use the T1 on the street for that reason.. the langster is built for the street.

  21. #21
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    Are those frames really going to be much more fragile than my Langster? The Langster is aluminum as well and doesn't seem to be more reinforced than these other 3 bikes. Plus the langster is already a very stiff ride, I feel every little bump and crak in the road for sure. It was a huge adjustment from my old trek 1000sl road bike. But I've learned to love it and don't think that I would mind a stiff frame. It's an awesome feeling to just haul ass around town and then have my really long rides on the smooth suburb roads. It seems like everyone is leaning towards these bikes being a bad idea. But the few times I've seen people riding them they seem awesome (although I've never seen anyone on a TK2). Thanks again for everyone's continued help.

  22. #22
    Senior Member JayNev's Avatar
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    chase. - -that was a great and informative post. don't usually that kind of write up and response here.
    i'll coast when i'm dead

  23. #23
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    thanks, jay and OP. i figured i might be one of a few people who could compare firsthand experience with all three, and thought it might be helpful.

    the whole 'don't get a pro track bike' argument does have validity, but ultimately it's up to you to decide. if you were asking whether you should get a corima, phm9, or a look 496 for your coffee bike, it might be a different story. are you probably buying more bike than you need to get around? sure. will you be faster or a better rider with a nice track bike? maybe, maybe not. but if it's something you want, go for it. also, if you decide your track frame isn't suitable for your type of riding or area, i'm sure you wouldn't have a problem swapping it here or on velospace for something that would fit your needs better. hope it helps out.

  24. #24
    NEWSNEAKERHEAD
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    It sounds like you've already got your mind made up. Now your just looking for someone to justify your own mental decision.....
    You already said you've got a buyer for the Langster. If you want to buy one just for the "look" your never gonna get anyone agree with you here. Cut your losses. If you want it.... buy it!

    Why bother asking advice if your not gonna take it?

  25. #25
    Senior Member mcsurf's Avatar
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    T1 vs Cannondale

    I have both bikes and agree that the T1 is a little harsh, but disagree that the components won't hold up. My Canondale is a CAAD 5 with Dura Ace hubs and is probably 6 years old. I ride it daily and have never had a component fail. Everyone said it's too delicate for street use but I don't think so. I weigh 195 and live at the beach so there's always sand around but the bearings are still just fine. The Trek is very well made and very smooth. I always wind up going past the radar sign a few mphs faster on the Trek than the Cannondale with the same gearing. The only major difference is the Trek is a little smaller and feels more compact. The Capo that Cannondale is selling now has pretty decent components and the same frame I have. I'd have a look at that one especially considering the price difference. My two cents.
    a wink is as good as a nod to a blind fish

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