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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 01-26-04, 03:09 PM   #1
pjbaz
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Bad fixed day, question about frame sizing?

I was all set to build up my fixed project, a '77 Fuji, when I noticed there is a crack the length of the threaded portion of the forks. Damn! I was so close to installing it, thankfully I noticed the crack.

Anyway, the broken fork makes me reconsider my project...so I need a little help regarding sizing of the frame.

Is a fixed gear (conversion) supposed to be the same size you would ride as a roadie?

The Fuji I was building was a little tall (it was $5) and I was going to make it work, but now I have to use another bike. I have a few other bikes around (thrift store finds, etc.) but they're a litlle small. I should be on a 56cm (or so) and the Trek 500 I have around is more like a 54cm.

Is it traditional to have a smaller frame for a fixie? It seems to me that seatposts in the pictures are way up there.

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Old 01-26-04, 03:39 PM   #2
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I built my first SS (A Peugeot) with a larger frame which was a tad too big for me. It felt alright but handling felt strange.

I then picked up an old Team Fuji, which is my current ride and it fits me perfectly. I was surprised by the quickness and responsiveness of the smaller frame (only 2cm off) compared to the Peugeot.

I have my seat pretty up there since that's my correct leg length for the bike. I prefer that sort of racing style position though. I feel more in control of the bike and it feels "beneath me" instead of in front of me.
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Old 01-26-04, 06:24 PM   #3
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Are you sure that is a crack and not the keyway for the headset spacer. The Peogeot has that groove on the back side of the stearer tube when the fork is facing to the forward position. If it is a crack, you can have the stearer tube replaced by any competant bicycle torch.

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Old 01-26-04, 06:26 PM   #4
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Sorry it should read Fuji not Peogeot, whatever that may be. Brain fart.

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Old 01-27-04, 09:50 AM   #5
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No, it's definitely a crack...in fact, it runs the entire length of that keyway. I wouldn't have even noticed it except I was going to bash on a new crown race and turned the fork around to see the back.

As far as repair, not worth the $$$ to me. The bike was $5 and from what I can tell it's a lower end Fuji.

I'm going to build a '84 Trek 500 fixed now. It's just a tad small for me, the original post question, but what the hell it was another cheap frame and the font brakes reach my 700C wheels. That'll save a few dollars at least.

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Old 01-27-04, 10:13 AM   #6
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Am I the only one wondering how you get a crack that runs the length of the keyway on a steel fork? We're talking about steel here, not a carbon steerer.
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Old 01-27-04, 10:36 AM   #7
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Steel steerers can crack if they are used with a loose headset for any length of time. The keyway acts as a stress raiser, so it is the focus for all the stress in the tube.
I know of one rider who suffered a catastrophic failure of a quality traditional steel fork through a loose headset. Rare but possible.
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Old 01-27-04, 10:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchivo
Am I the only one wondering how you get a crack that runs the length of the keyway on a steel fork? We're talking about steel here, not a carbon steerer.
i agree. It is one of the stranger things I have heard of as it relates to bicycles. Metal is a wounderous material.

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Old 01-27-04, 01:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Steel steerers can crack if they are used with a loose headset for any length of time. The keyway acts as a stress raiser, so it is the focus for all the stress in the tube.
I know of one rider who suffered a catastrophic failure of a quality traditional steel fork through a loose headset. Rare but possible.
Interesting. When you say loose headset, do you mean cups loose in the head tube or just a loose top? Also, are we talking about a horizontal or a vertical crack? I wouldn't think a horizontal crack would sneak up on you (I figure you would feel play in the fork). As for a vertical crack, I have no idea how that would form.
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Old 01-27-04, 07:28 PM   #10
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It's definitely vertical and definitely steel. I'll try and shoot a pic in the next day or so to post here.

Like I said, I wasn't searching for it, just came across it. Happy (and sad) I did.

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