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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 08-07-08, 01:18 PM   #1
Aldone
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Tips for going backward/backward circles?

Please help me, I'm good at trackstanding, skids, but I really can't go backward, any good tips?
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Old 08-07-08, 01:20 PM   #2
jpdesjar
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when i first started to learn backward circles i would stand slightly on the pedals so my weight was over the bars a bit and then i just started to slowly back pedal to get the feel for the balance...takes a little practicing
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Old 08-07-08, 01:23 PM   #3
iamtim
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Interesting. I find centering my weight over the seat to be better than having it over the bars. If I lean too far over the bars, I lose balance.
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Old 08-07-08, 01:26 PM   #4
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just slightly over the bars for me...i am still working on these though, sometimes i get the bike around too quickly and i get slung off
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Old 08-07-08, 01:28 PM   #5
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Anyone do this clipless? I can do a quarter turn before my lose balance and have to clip out.
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Old 08-07-08, 01:32 PM   #6
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i've been told the fatter the tires the easier the backward circle.
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Old 08-07-08, 02:16 PM   #7
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I've just switched (back) to clipless, so my reverse training has been postponed for a few weeks. While on flat pedals I found two things: 1. Leaning over the handlebars a little to zip around backwards will give you the fastest and sketchiest results. This requires quite a bit of effort in the arms and legs. 2. Sitting on the saddle is best, but requires more practice. Part of this practice includes remembering that your balance on the bike doesn't require (so much) the use of your eyes, and that they get in the way (somehow). Relax and sit down and try to spin well, circle widely, and remain centered in yourself. Now off to figure out how to do this with sticky pedals.
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Old 08-07-08, 04:13 PM   #8
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I'm practicing this too. Thanks for the tips.
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Old 08-07-08, 10:14 PM   #9
sedition
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One trick to learning them is keeping your front wheel locked at a given angle, to the best extent you can. If you are altering the angle of your front tire a lot, it will be constantlly changing the circumfrence of your circle. In turn, this will also make your center of gravity / balance point move all over the place. The result, is instability. When you are first learning them, try to remove as many variables a you can. Pick a circle diameter that feels natural, and try to keep your speed the same every time you try it. Also try to keep your posture the same. At this point, all your left with is how much you lean to one side or the other. Once you start to find the "sweet spot" THEN you can really start messing around speed and the size of the circle, etc.

And as someone else already said, the biggest key is to relax.
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Old 08-07-08, 10:40 PM   #10
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learning how to track stand in all 4 positions will make learning them very easy because you will be used to balancing when your wheel is not turned the way you are comfy with. that's all the advice I can give, now you gotta practice and find what works for you

Here's a vid of me doing backriding (about 2 years ago when I was still trying to master it):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRdqzb21nTc
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