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  1. #1
    Senior Member daft crunk's Avatar
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    when was french sizing phased out?

    please say 1986

  2. #2
    Spelling Snob Hobartlemagne's Avatar
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    uh, ok. 1986.

    this page: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/f...ks.html#bottom

    says this: Many French bikes sold before the late 1970s used the now-obsolete French bottom-bracket threading
    Last edited by Hobartlemagne; 08-19-08 at 02:11 PM.

    The first rule of flats is You don't talk about flats!

  3. #3
    partly metal, partly real sp00ki's Avatar
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    1986
    Quote Originally Posted by bonechilling View Post
    Road [racing] is one of the only sports where adult men can compete in a non-scholastic setting, so inevitably 8/10 racers are fiercely-competitive nobodies. It's fun as hell, but it's also the foremost refuge of defeated and aging jocks, turned middle-management types.

  4. #4
    FNG Jabba Degrassi's Avatar
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    6891, but the people of the future were sick of having to deal with the remnants of thousands of years of french sizing, so they went back in time and had it phased out in 1986.

  5. #5
    Senior Member VT tallbike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by competitivecyclist.com
    # The French Fit.
    This fit is so named because of its legacy in the traditions of endurance road riding such as brevet rides and randonneuring. However, the French Fit isn't merely about touring, riding long, or even sitting more upright. It is about getting the most out of a bike that fits larger and provides much more comfort to the neck, back, and saddle position.

    While the Competitive Fit generally puts you on the smallest appropriate frame and the Eddy Fit sizes up a bit or raises the bars, the French Fit puts you on the largest appropriate frame. While this bucks some current conventional wisdom - and is, in fact, the least commonly used position of the three we espouse - it is still the position advocated by some of cycling's wisest and most experienced designers, who also happened to be riders who like to go fast and far with an ideal amount of comfort.

    This fit features a taller front end (with a larger frame and/or head tube extension and stem), handlebar to saddle drops that are much closer to level, and favors riders who are looking to ease stress on the neck and back, ride as long and as far as they like, and are not concerned with the looking like an aggressive professional. In comparison to the Eddy Fit, the rider has even more weight rearward and a slightly more upright position such that "hands in the drops position" is close to the Competitive Fit's "hands on the hoods position." Some may say that this was not how modern race bikes were "meant" to fit but we have learned that the French Fit's size up tradition works great on the most modern bikes.

    By increasing the frame size we raise the bars without radical riser stems and still create balance and proportion with respect to the important knee-to-pedal dynamic. It is important to remember that as frames get larger the top tube effectively shortens. This means that the longer top tube on a larger frame is appropriate because as the bars come "up" and the ratio of saddle to bar drop lessens, the rider achieves a "reach" from the saddle to the handlebars that is just right!

    We recommend this fit for riders who really want to be comfortable and fast over longer distances. Please note that the French Fit disregards all emphasis on stand over height (standing with the bike between your legs and your shoes flat on the ground) because the French Fit school believes that this measurement has little actual value regarding fit. An ideal compromise for those who can't shed their concern regarding stand over height is the choice of a "sized up" compact design to achieve a higher relative handlebar position.

    Nevertheless, a French Fit can work with traditional, non-sloping frames as well. As an example, a person who might ride a 55cm or 56cm frame to achieve the Competitive Fit, might ride as much as a 59cm or 60cm in the French Fit. While bikes in the French Fit are not the racer's fashion they tend to look elegant, well proportioned, and ride like a dream.
    I think some people still use it.

  6. #6
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    1986

  7. #7
    Instigator at best kjohnnytarr's Avatar
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    doesn't Phil Wood make a french bb? Or somebody?
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshFrank View Post
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  8. #8
    CPM M4 BananaTugger's Avatar
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    Mid 1980's.

    The French bottom bracket died when Look started making English bottom bracket frames.
    Ten tenths.

  9. #9
    Spelling Snob Hobartlemagne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VT tallbike View Post
    I think some people still use it.
    The OP is referring to a type of threadding that french bottom brackets used to be made with.

    The first rule of flats is You don't talk about flats!

  10. #10
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    Phil does indeed make french threaded cups for their bb. I had one in the Peugeot track bike I had for a bit. I believe they are the only option for a sealed bb. Sugino makes french cups for the 75 bb as well. They may be the only other option really out there other than pretty old stuff.

    French headsets were also a little different and finding french stems is apparently an even bigger pain in the ass. Fortunately, you can take a regular stem and basically sand off a very small amount and make any stem fit. This is only what I have been told or read and I have not tried it. For some reason, my Peugeot had a fork and headset that accepted standard quill stems.

    You could also just replace the fork and headset to eliminate that problem.

  11. #11
    donut post windup capybara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by veganwar View Post
    Phil does indeed make french threaded cups for their bb. I had one in the Peugeot track bike I had for a bit. I believe they are the only option for a sealed bb. Sugino makes french cups for the 75 bb as well. They may be the only other option really out there other than pretty old stuff.

    French headsets were also a little different and finding french stems is apparently an even bigger pain in the ass. Fortunately, you can take a regular stem and basically sand off a very small amount and make any stem fit. This is only what I have been told or read and I have not tried it. For some reason, my Peugeot had a fork and headset that accepted standard quill stems.

    You could also just replace the fork and headset to eliminate that problem.
    i lost the expander wedge to my french stem, so i sanded a standard one down. sheldon brown says you have to take off something like .2mm from the diameter, but i found i had to do far more. it works, though.

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