Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New England
    My Bikes
    recumbent, mtn bike, road bike
    Posts
    357
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Has anyone tried this?

    Converting a touring bike into a single speed?

    Why you might ask?

    For commuting.

    I am thinking of buying a Fuji touring bike at my LBS and having them make it a single speed. NB, that this touring bike has horizontal rear dropouts (not very long so it wouldn't have enough travel for a flip flop but one ss would work, we think).

    It would provide

    Stable geometry.

    comfy ride (steel frame)

    fenders

    and wouldn't have to worry about pannier/heel clearance.

    and prevent toe overlap.

    The other ss options would be to buy a San Jose or build up a Surly Cross Check.

    I love SS riding but need a road worthy foul weather set up

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member EatMyA**'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    930
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    NO but I am on it. Sounds like a good idea.

  3. #3
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,268
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it is pretty common actually. Unless the commute is hilly, it really makes sense to simplify the bike as much as possible to increase its reliability.

    And, even with short dropouts you can probably still get away with a one or two tooth difference on each side of a flip-flop. Each tooth adds 1/2 inch of chain. Half on the top half of the loop, half on the bottom, so each tooth requires 1/4 inch of drop. I bet your drops are longer than 1/4 inch.

    jim
    Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
    --------------------------
    SB forever

  4. #4
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by UberIM View Post
    Converting a touring bike into a single speed?

    Why you might ask?

    For commuting.

    I am thinking of buying a Fuji touring bike at my LBS and having them make it a single speed. NB, that this touring bike has horizontal rear dropouts (not very long so it wouldn't have enough travel for a flip flop but one ss would work, we think).

    It would provide

    Stable geometry.

    comfy ride (steel frame)

    fenders

    and wouldn't have to worry about pannier/heel clearance.

    and prevent toe overlap.

    The other ss options would be to buy a San Jose or build up a Surly Cross Check.

    I love SS riding but need a road worthy foul weather set up

    Thanks
    This is pretty much what any old road frame conversion is going to be as well. Assuming it has all the eyelets/stuff that makes a commuter a commuter.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  5. #5
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jgedwa View Post
    I think it is pretty common actually. Unless the commute is hilly, it really makes sense to simplify the bike as much as possible to increase its reliability.

    And, even with short dropouts you can probably still get away with a one or two tooth difference on each side of a flip-flop. Each tooth adds 1/2 inch of chain. Half on the top half of the loop, half on the bottom, so each tooth requires 1/4 inch of drop. I bet your drops are longer than 1/4 inch.

    jim
    Your best case scenario assumes that the axle is all they way forward or back, in one of the positions for your 1/4" calculation. This is obviously not going to be the case for 99% of the gearing setups out there.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •