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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 01-06-09, 11:57 PM   #1
sukanas
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Just ordered the Hour, First time Fixie... Help on Tools and Precaution?

after much debate and search between the hour and kilto tt, i decide to go with the hour cause i liked the matte gray frame better (some of the pictures on this forum are awesome!). i figured since a lot of the parts will get upgraded in the future, i might as well go with the 50 dollar cheaper bike with a color that i liked.

to give a little background, im a ucdavis student so therefore i bike a lot. originally being from socal, i bought a cheap 60 dollar bike from target and after seeing and being more familiar with the whole bike community, i decided to jump on the boat and get a fixed gear bike.

1) i was wondering what i should 'immediately' replace. i know most of you guys will probably suggest to replace practically almost everything given that its a cheap bike but please be reasonable for me. ive read about the bike hubs needing to be replaced a lot... is there anything i should know?

2)also, what kind of tools would i need? i know this is a very vague question but is there anything in particular i should know about tools such as a 'bike tool set' or something?

3) is there that 'one' cheap online retail bike store that i should buy and ones that i should avoid? ie. avoid buying computers from best buy and order from frys or something... or for musicians, order from musiciansfriend.com. like most other goods, are online retail stores gonna be the cheapest or are they gonna be relatively similar to my local (Davis, CA) bike shop prices?



thanks for reading and im looking forward to being a part of this biking community!
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Old 01-07-09, 12:16 AM   #2
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1) nothing. wait until things break. or at least until you've been doing it long enough to know what YOU want.

2) A good bike multi-tool, a size 15 wrench, tire levers, and a pump...a spare tube for that matter

3) buy local whenever you can! if you buy parts/tools from your shop, they'll help you when you run into problems (and are most likely a much more reliable resource than the forums). plus, your keeping your money in your community.
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Old 01-07-09, 12:35 AM   #3
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be super careful... a brand new fixie at davis.. there are tons of people out there waiting for that... i'd be super paranoid if i had a bike at davis..


make sure you tighten up the cog and lockring.. there has been a lot of people on the forum who ride the bike off the box without really tightening the cog/lock ring

online bike places i like to go to are

bikeisland.com
probikekit.com
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Old 01-07-09, 12:53 AM   #4
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yeah i definitely have to take an extra precaution w/ owning a bike at davis

i plan on getting a ulock w/ those chain to chain up the front/back wheels.

would you guys recommend locking a bike w/ a lot of traffic where people would notice if the bike is being stolen or somewhere 'unoticable?'
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Old 01-07-09, 01:03 AM   #5
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lock a bike up in a high traffic area.
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Old 01-07-09, 01:03 AM   #6
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When I bought my first bike I made the investment of buying a Park Tool tool kit, and after 2 years I still use it often.

That'd be my advice.
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Old 01-07-09, 01:14 AM   #7
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link to cheap park tool kit, please. or nashbar, or any, for that matter that would be useful to the OP, and myself
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Old 01-07-09, 01:17 AM   #8
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link to cheap park tool kit, please. or nashbar, or any, for that matter that would be useful to the OP, and myself


and me!
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Old 01-07-09, 01:26 AM   #9
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I shelled out the money for the Advanced Mechanic Tool Kit, but comparing the tool list to the Nashbar one, the Nashbar one seems great.

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...Fresults%2Ecfm 40% off too.

I learned everything I know by doing it myself. And it's also super cool to help out some of your friends when they get a new chain or pedals or cogs and you have the tools. Ask them to pay you in some beer and it's a fun afternoon.
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Old 01-07-09, 06:35 AM   #10
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1) nothing. wait until things break. or at least until you've been doing it long enough to know what YOU want.


Contrary to what gets said around here; in general there is nothing "unridable" about stock BD bikes.

I think the pedals were the most craptacular part on my Messenger but they were getting upgraded to SPD pedals anyway. I didn't find the saddle to be very comfortable but I gave it to a friend who said he had no problem with it.

Congrats on the new bike purchase, riding fixed is a lot of fun.
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Old 01-07-09, 11:56 AM   #11
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i go to uc davis too. my tip on locking your bike on campus is look for a bike that is more expensive than yours and park next to it. oh and use more locks than that other bike.

you might see me on a matte gray windsor with yellow bartape on campus.
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Old 01-07-09, 11:59 AM   #12
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there are far too many aggies on this forum it seems...Don't forget that most of the work you need to do can be done at the Bike Barn tool loan station, or the Bike Church, when it gets resurrected...

As far as locking, get a good u-lock, and don't leave your bike out overnight and you should be ok.
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Old 01-07-09, 12:18 PM   #13
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I was a first year student at uc davis last year, and im going to go back to davis in fall of 09' and i also have a matte grey windsor hour. Honestly, its a cheap fixed gear and i wouldnt worry too much about it. as long as u dont put super flashy parts on it, it will blend in with the other 100 bikes infront of every lecture hall.

as far as tools go, just buy a cheap mechanics tool set, set of allen wrenches and metric wrenches, screw driver set. they have some good ones for cheap on amazon. U might want to get a lockring wrench.. if u dont have a lockring wrench, just use a flathead driver and a hammer to lightly tap and tighten the lockring. It needs to be tightened when it is new. just dont smash down on it with the hammer too hard, that lockring can break pretty easily against a flathead.
i actually tried to sell my windsor on CL a little while ago and i got a few responses from ppl from uc davis, haha. I ended up keeping this bike because its so fun.
u might want to get a new cog or freewheel with more teeth, maybe 16 or 17. The stock 15t cog gets pretty tiring in stop n go riding.
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Old 01-07-09, 04:15 PM   #14
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Get a patch kit! Get a front and rear light!
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Old 01-07-09, 04:19 PM   #15
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get a new cog and lockring. I'd suggest a 17t, it gives a good ratio and 17 skid patches
get a brake.
get a new saddle.
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Old 01-07-09, 04:38 PM   #16
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You're probably going to hear the spokes ping as everything is settling. Put a few maybe 50 miles on it, then take it the shop and have a mechanic tension the spokes and true the wheels . .

It shouldn't cost you more than $20 bucks for both wheels.
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Old 01-07-09, 06:51 PM   #17
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The thing that I hated the most on my Kilo were the crappy Kenda tires. I was kinda glad when I tore the sidewall on one and had to replace it.

I find that the rest is fine stock until it breaks or wears out.

Well, I did replace the pedals (to SPD) and the saddle (which squeaked to the point of driving me crazy!) Oh yea, I also have a selection of cogs to choose from.

Last edited by drjava; 01-07-09 at 06:55 PM.
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Old 01-07-09, 07:15 PM   #18
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Another cheap tool kit with all the essentials: http://bikeisland.com/cgi-bin/BKTK_S...ls&ProdID=1229
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Old 01-07-09, 07:17 PM   #19
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Don't park in front of the Library. Also, watch out for the bike cop in downtown Davis - he's notorious for pulling over fixed gears with no brakes/lights - I saw him pulling over a guy on a conversion just last night for having no brakes.
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Old 01-07-09, 07:17 PM   #20
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Don't replace anything right away, the bike will be fine. Install a front brake, change the saddle if it doesn't suit you, replace the stem and handlebars of they don't suit you, otherwise just ride the bike.
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Old 01-07-09, 08:39 PM   #21
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Don't park in front of the Library. Also, watch out for the bike cop in downtown Davis - he's notorious for pulling over fixed gears with no brakes/lights - I saw him pulling over a guy on a conversion just last night for having no brakes.
I saw a guy with 'in cog we trust' on his deep v getting a ticket for blowing though the stop sign at g and second. I felt kinda happy inside. That wasn't you, was it?
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Old 01-07-09, 08:56 PM   #22
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What nobody else has mentioned (that I've seen) and every cyclist with any sense absolutely has to have is a floor pump.

I also second buying a tool kit. When I had to replace my locknut, I didn't even know what tool I needed to tighten a new one down but there was one in my tool kit.

When I had to put a new cog on my bike, I had a chainwhip in my tool kit.

When I had to pull my cranks, I had my crank puller there. When I looked at my bottom bracket, I found the tool that fit to take it out.

It's INCREDIBLY useful to have a bunch of tools to cover just about any situation. However, that said if money is tight the only ones you're going to likely need in an emergency is as someone already mentioned,

1- Chain breaker
2- Allen Key set
3- 15mm wrench
4- Lockring tool
5- Tire levers
6- Tube and patches

That's enough to handle the real standard stuff, but it's extremely rewarding to learn how to strip your bike right down and service everything. The only thing left for me to learn is headsets, and it's nice being able to fix anything that goes wrong.

EDIT: Oh ****, and if it's bikesdirect you're going to want a spoke wrench. Better still, take your wheels in to get a full truing by someone who knows how to build wheels

Last edited by elTwitcho; 01-07-09 at 09:01 PM.
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Old 01-07-09, 08:57 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scratcher33 View Post
1) nothing. wait until things break. or at least until you've been doing it long enough to know what YOU want.

2) A good bike multi-tool, a size 15 wrench, tire levers, and a pump...a spare tube for that matter

3) buy local whenever you can! if you buy parts/tools from your shop, they'll help you when you run into problems (and are most likely a much more reliable resource than the forums). plus, your keeping your money in your community.
+1 on the "wait until things break". At this point, EVERYTHING looks like an awesome, Must-Have upgrade. Wait a while, fight the urge, and then you'll see you don't really need that gold-plated seatpost clamp or that Uranium crankset with niobium chainrings.


Tools I use most are metric allen wrenches to tighten stuff on the bike. You need them for stem, seatpost clamp, some pedals, brakes, etc. Tire levers to get the tire on and off the rim. A patch kit for your tubes. Of course, the 15mm wrench for removing wheels. I got the Surly wrench because it's stubby, others have the stubby Sears Craftsman 15mm wrench or cut a long one down. A pedal wrench is nice as is a lock ring removal tool and a chain whip. Some Phil Wood grease or automotive bearing grease is good once a year. Pedros chain lube is your friend. I use a Pedros chain cleaner machine but you can use Dawn dishwashing detergent and a toothbrush or some Simple Green. WD-40 is a good cleaner but is NOT A LUBE and should not be used as such.

I have a Trek saddle bag that is easily removed if I'm worried about theft. I keep the tire levers, 15mm wrench, and patch kit in there. Plus an extra tube. But I do a lot of riding miles from anything and it would really suck to have to walk home because I had a flat tire.

A floor pump is absolutely necessary. Check your tire pressure every other day. I also have a small frame pump attached to the bike in case of flats. You can carry this in a messenger bag. Topeak Pocket Rocket.

Performancebike.com, nashbar.com, benscycle.com and my favorite, harriscyclery.net are good online sources but as others have said, get yourself in good with a local bike shop. There will be repairs you can't do or don't have the tools to do, parts you need asap, advice, tips on maintenance, etc. that you'll only get from a local shop. I do whatever I can to support my local shops and do a little extra and sneak pizza and beer to the guys in the repair shop every now and then. They appreciate it and if I've got a problem, it's really no problem; they take care of me.
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Old 01-07-09, 09:01 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by elTwitcho View Post
I second buying a tool kit. When I had to replace my locknut, I didn't even know what tool I needed to tighten a new one down but there was one in my tool kit.

When I had to put a new cog on my bike, I had a chainwhip in my tool kit.

When I had to pull my cranks, I had my crank puller there. When I looked at my bottom bracket, I found the tool that fit to take it out.

It's INCREDIBLY useful to have a bunch of tools to cover just about any situation. However, that said if money is tight the only ones you're going to likely need in an emergency is as someone already mentioned,

1- Chain breaker
2- Allen Key set
3- 15mm wrench
4- Lockring tool
5- Tire levers
6- Tube and patches

That's enough to handle the real standard stuff, but it's extremely rewarding to learn how to strip your bike right down and service everything. The only thing left for me to learn is headsets, and it's nice being able to fix anything that goes wrong.

EDIT: Oh ****, and if it's bikesdirect you're going to want a spoke wrench. Better still, take your wheels in to get a full truing by someone who knows how to build wheels
If you've managed to swap out a bottom bracket, servicing a headset is a breeze.

There used to be a D-I-Y thread that was stickied up in these forums. There were guides to servicing threaded headsets, Sugino 75 bottom brackets, and a bunch of other guides. What a dumb thread to delete, it was so useful.
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Old 01-07-09, 09:04 PM   #25
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If you've managed to swap out a bottom bracket, servicing a headset is a breeze.

There used to be a D-I-Y thread that was stickied up in these forums. There were guides to servicing threaded headsets, Sugino 75 bottom brackets, and a bunch of other guides. What a dumb thread to delete, it was so useful.
Thanks dude I'll take a search around the forums for it
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