Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-22-09, 11:23 PM   #1
erpdat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes:
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
putting it together

I got my 51cm Pake frame set in the mail today and I'm so stoked.
I've never built up a bike before, my friend did my current fixed gear conversion for me.
So, I'm wondering, how much (on average) will a bike shop charge to put a bike together?

I don't have much money left over from the frame set and am thinking about doing it myself.
It can't be that hard, right?

I probably sound completely ridiculous, I'm a noob. sorry.

And thanks in advance for any help.
erpdat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-09, 11:56 PM   #2
Guvna
Not a dick.
 
Guvna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Philly.
Bikes:
Posts: 463
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No idea, but you'll have to pick up a lot of tools to do it yourself. Maybe just install the parts you know you can do fairly easily with the tools you have, then have the shop finish it from there. As awkward as it feels to ask, it would also be wise to have the run you through the process as well.
Guvna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:01 AM   #3
wearyourtruth
Ride for Life
 
wearyourtruth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Baltimore
Bikes:
Posts: 2,729
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
if you can get an LBS to install the bottom bracket and the headset/fork the rest can all be done with wrenches, allen wrenches, and/or screwdrivers, with the exception of the chain, if it doesn't have a quicklink
wearyourtruth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:02 AM   #4
tmh657
Senior Member
 
tmh657's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: SoCal
Bikes: A few BSO's.
Posts: 2,470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
It's not that hard until you hit a snag. Find someone with experience to help you in person.
tmh657 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:11 AM   #5
erpdat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes:
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Awesome. Thanks everyone.

I have a feeling a shop will charge $50 or so for the full assembly and I really do want to learn this whole process. I learned how to change a tube the other day and it was one of the most beneficial things I've learned... in a long time..

So, I'll do what I can, then go into the shop.

If they have time, I'll see if they can just guide me through it, and maybe if possible, if I don't have enough cash to cover it, I can talk to them about doing some clean up work or something. Haha. I'll mention this before we get started of course
erpdat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:14 AM   #6
SpaceFace
∞mpg
 
SpaceFace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Austin via Houston
Bikes: Nishiki Riviera GT and a Sparton
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To find out how much a bike shop will charge you should just call a few in your town.
SpaceFace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:17 AM   #7
tmh657
Senior Member
 
tmh657's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: SoCal
Bikes: A few BSO's.
Posts: 2,470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
FYI unless you are tight with someone at your LBS or get lucky they aren't always willing to help for free. That's why it's called a business. Good luck.
tmh657 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:17 AM   #8
vegipowrd
Lifer
 
vegipowrd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Jose, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There are also a ton of small things that you can do yourself that are just annoying and time consuming, but not hard and don't require any tools. Remind your LBS you can install toe cages, bar tape, brakes and a number of other things yourself. You may end up saving a little that way.
vegipowrd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:27 AM   #9
erpdat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes:
Posts: 399
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegipowrd View Post
There are also a ton of small things that you can do yourself that are just annoying and time consuming, but not hard and don't require any tools. Remind your LBS you can install toe cages, bar tape, brakes and a number of other things yourself. You may end up saving a little that way.
Well, I already have all the parts ready. Toe Cages, bar tape, etc. I'm using all the same components from my conversion, just putting on the new frame/fork.

However, I'd like to get bullhorns. My body is a bit awkward. The standover is perfect, but the reach is 10mm to short. I figure with bullhorns, this will even it out. I wanted bullhorns anyways though.

Also, another noob question.....

I got the stock Unicrown fork for the Pake. It's the same fork for all sizes..

When I attach the fork to the frame, there's an excess of steel, about a foot and a half taller than the top tube? I'm guessing this is just in case you're running a 62cm or something? Am I supposed to cut off the excess I don't need?

Oh and this is random.. but...

I'm running sweet Cinelli track bars but really want some bullhorns. Not only cos the 10mm I need to make up for, but I dig em also.

I'll post this again separately in the trade section, but if anyone wants to trade some solid bullhorns for my Cinellis, PM me.



Thanks!
erpdat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 12:35 AM   #10
tmh657
Senior Member
 
tmh657's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: SoCal
Bikes: A few BSO's.
Posts: 2,470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erpdat View Post

I got the stock Unicrown fork for the Pake. It's the same fork for all sizes..

When I attach the fork to the frame, there's an excess of steel, about a foot and a half taller than the top tube? I'm guessing this is just in case you're running a 62cm or something? Am I supposed to cut off the excess I don't need?
Thanks!
Yes, ya gotta cut the fork, that is best left to someone that really knows what they are doing. You can always cut it shorter but, well you know.
tmh657 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 01:11 AM   #11
monsieuroctagon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Getting a shop to do the headset is always a good idea, because without a press made to do it it can be pretty difficult. They never charge too much to do that. A bottom bracket tool, though, is like 10 bucks and a really good buy. It helps to have one.
monsieuroctagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 01:39 AM   #12
tmh657
Senior Member
 
tmh657's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: SoCal
Bikes: A few BSO's.
Posts: 2,470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by monsieuroctagon View Post
Getting a shop to do the headset is always a good idea, because without a press made to do it it can be pretty difficult. They never charge too much to do that. A bottom bracket tool, though, is like 10 bucks and a really good buy. It helps to have one.
+1 on the BB tool. Mine has paid for itself about 20 times over.
tmh657 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 07:12 AM   #13
nelzar13
Senior Member
 
nelzar13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Coventry RI
Bikes: 1958 raleigh fixed , specialized P2, standard S250, giant cross country bike
Posts: 293
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
in my opinion its way better to do it your self! Spend the 10 bills for a bottom bracket tool and the 5 bucks it costs at home depot to make a cup press out of some threaded rod ,big ass washers, and a couple of nuts. Some allen wrenches couple of other wrenches.... If you spend 50 bucks on tools youll be able to take you bike apart and fix it when something goes wrong VS paying fifty bucks for some goon at the bike shop to put it together for you for 50 bucks and a half hour of their time. Then down the road start buying a couple other tools crank pullers and other stuff youd like to have so you dont have to use a hammer to get your cranks off! As far as the fork..Get everything together so its comfy to ride. Then make a mark on your fork where the top of your stem is and cut it an 1/8 below that mark (pipe cutter)... Bike are easy just got to finger them a little bit.. But you will be way better off in the end if you do it your self! My 2 Cents...
nelzar13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-09, 07:18 AM   #14
Build your own
%#&*#%>?%
 
Build your own's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mass
Bikes: Pake,Shogun,Nishiki,Motobecane
Posts: 845
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cutting the steerer and installing the headset should be left to the Lbs but since you are using the parts from your conversion,just swap them yourself.Taking them off will give you some understanding on how they work and how to put them on.A crankpuller,BB tool and chain breaker are the only special tools you'll need.Those are good to have anyways.If you hit any snags,ask your friend or the lbs.
Build your own is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:48 PM.