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  1. #1
    Senior Member Azndude51's Avatar
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    Quill to threadless adapter: Better or worse?

    I got a good deal on a bullhorn bar to replace my flop and chop bar. I wanted to get a new stem too but I'm not a big fan of threaded/quill. I decided to try a quill to threadless adapter since replacing the headset and fork too would be too expensive. You can see the results below. In the second set, the adapter is pushed as far down as it would go but the skinny part still shows. I tried using headset spacers to cover it up in the third set. I'm just curious about what you guys think. I think it looks passable so I'll probably be keeping it for a while. I know it's not ideal but I always still have the option of either going full threadless or just getting a really nice quill stem.

    Before (click to enlarge):


    After installing the adapter, it is as far down as it will go (click to enlarge):


    After installing headset spacers to attempt to hide the awkward skinny section (click to enlarge):

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sangetsu's Avatar
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    I've always preferred quill stems. The threadless nonsense was another example of trying to fix something that wasn't broken. Quill stems are simple, with only 2 bolts, they are easy to adjust (without adding/removing spacers), and they look much better.

  3. #3
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
    I've always preferred quill stems. The threadless nonsense was another example of trying to fix something that wasn't broken. Quill stems are simple, with only 2 bolts, they are easy to adjust (without adding/removing spacers), and they look much better.
    Do you mean the treaded to threadless adaptor?

    The threadless stem is great.
    - You get 2 stem angles for the price of one.
    - No scratching your bars to thread them through.
    - Ability to use non-uniform shaped bars.
    - For track use: Easy changes from drop bars to TT bars. Otherwise you have to have a seperate bar+stem combo.

    It is significantly advanced technology. So much so that only "old school" bikes use them.



    Threaded to threadless adaptors look terrible and add points of failure to your bike.

  4. #4
    A little North of Hell
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    I'm just curious about what you guys think.
    not all adapters are made the same.

    http://www.bikeparts.com/search_resu...p?ID=BPC110052
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    XXXI

  5. #5
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    It looks better with the spacers.

    That said, I don't know why you bought a Thompson stem when you won't be experiencing any of the performance benefits. Your current setup is heavier and flexes more than the stock stem, I am guessing. Also, if you didn't want to shell out the money for a proper conversion to threadless, why did you go all out and get a Thompson stem?

    EDIT: I should probably know how to spell Thomson, especially since I own one of their stems and work at a bike shop.
    Last edited by darksiderising; 03-16-09 at 01:09 AM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Azndude51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darksiderising View Post
    It looks better with the spacers.

    That said, I don't know why you bought a Thompson stem when you won't be experiencing any of the performance benefits. Your current setup is heavier and flexes more than the stock stem, I am guessing. Also, if you didn't want to shell out the money for a proper conversion to threadless, why did you go all out and get a Thompson stem?
    I figured I'd buy a nicer stem now so if I ever decide to go complete threadless then I am all set. Also, i only paid $23 shipped on ebay for the stem so it's not a big deal.

  7. #7
    Primate Metzinger's Avatar
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    Listen to carlton and dark on this. When carlton mentions "points of failure", he doesn't only mean structurally.

  8. #8
    * adriano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darksiderising View Post
    It looks better with the spacers.

    That said, I don't know why you bought a Thompson stem when you won't be experiencing any of the performance benefits. Your current setup is heavier and flexes more than the stock stem, I am guessing. Also, if you didn't want to shell out the money for a proper conversion to threadless, why did you go all out and get a Thompson stem?

    EDIT: I should probably know how to spell Thomson, especially since I own one of their stems and work at a bike shop.
    misspelling thomson scored me a cheap stem as the seller misspelled it as well!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    misspelling thomson scored me a cheap stem as the seller misspelled it as well!
    haha

  10. #10
    Rumblefish jtarver's Avatar
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    A threaded to threadless adapter has no more failure points than a threaded or threadless set up. I had no idea so many metallurgists posted on BF though. BTW the reason you can't get your adapter flush is because of the butting in your steerer tube, I had the same issue when installing one on a smaller frame. You don't want the wedge wedged into this butting, seat the stem in as far as it easily goes, the raise it up a few millimeters and tighten it.
    1973 Crescent Pepita FG, 1987 Panasonic DX-4000, 1991 Trek 1400 FG, 1990's Gary Fisher Hoo-Koo-e-Koo SS, 1990's Denti Road Tech Five, 2009 Surly Long Haul Trucker

  11. #11
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtarver View Post
    A threaded to threadless adapter has no more failure points than a threaded or threadless set up. I had no idea so many metallurgists posted on BF though. BTW the reason you can't get your adapter flush is because of the butting in your steerer tube, I had the same issue when installing one on a smaller frame. You don't want the wedge wedged into this butting, seat the stem in as far as it easily goes, the raise it up a few millimeters and tighten it.
    Count of Points of Failure with a Threaded Fork:
    1: Vertical Stem Bolt
    2: That thingy at the bottom of the stem
    3: Headset bolt to fork
    4: Stem face bolt(s)

    Count of Points of Failure with a Threadless Fork:
    1: Horizontal Stem Bolts
    2: Vertical star nut bolt
    3: Stem face bolts

    Count of Points of Failure with a Threaded Fork with a threadless adaptor:
    1: Vertical Stem Bolt in the adaptor
    2: That thingy at the bottom of the stem adaptor
    3: Headset bolt to fork
    4: Horizontal stem bolts
    5: Stem face bolts


    When last I checked, 5 is greater than 3 and 4.

  12. #12
    Hello. crushkilldstroy's Avatar
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    Didn't we already have this exact same thread with this exact same bike?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jacquie Phelan
    Until mountain biking came along, the bike scene was ruled by a small elite cadre of people who seemed allergic to enthusiasm.

  13. #13
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Do you mean the treaded to threadless adaptor?

    The threadless stem is great.
    - You get 2 stem angles for the price of one.
    - No scratching your bars to thread them through.
    - Ability to use non-uniform shaped bars.
    - For track use: Easy changes from drop bars to TT bars. Otherwise you have to have a seperate bar+stem combo.
    If you're going to bring up b.s at least mention that points 2,3 and 4 is completely null and void if you're using a quill stem with a removeable faceplate. K thx BAI.

    OP: The adapter is fine. Go ride your ****ing bike already.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  14. #14
    Senior Member lukewall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
    I've always preferred quill stems. The threadless nonsense was another example of trying to fix something that wasn't broken. Quill stems are simple, with only 2 bolts, they are easy to adjust (without adding/removing spacers), and they look much better.
    Threadless is the furthest thing from nonsense. Stiffer + pop top faceplates make it worth the switch. The only time I would go threaded is if i'm restoring a retro bike.

    If you're going to talk about nonsense technology, start with ceramic bearings.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jabba Degrassi View Post
    And I can't help but lol at the "heavier-set" riders I see on the trails riding around on $5000 speed machines. Nothing funnier than someone paying $4000 to shave 5 lbs when they're packing an extra 50...

  15. #15
    Senior Member Azndude51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crushkilldstroy View Post
    Didn't we already have this exact same thread with this exact same bike?
    Yeah, but I added the spacers I figured I'd make a different thread to get fresh responses.

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