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  1. #1
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    First wheel build: Any comments?

    Okay, I most probably ****ed my rear hub and since it is on a cheap rim, I am going to replace the whole lot and build it myself.

    The hub will be a Surly New Rear track hub, 32H laced into a Mavic Open Pro rim 700c/23 with some Wheelsmith Straight 2.0 (294mm ) Spokes and matching nipples. The Cog and Lockring will both be Surly as well, just to ensure a proper fit.

    The aim of this wheel is to be used in non-competitive road riding. Thus, weight is not so much an issue but durability is.
    Any suggestions? Easy upgrades? Stupid things, bad matches or whatever in there? Or am I good to go with this stuff?

    EDIT: Seems if I go to a different store, I can swap the Surly parts out with Shimano Durace, better or worse?
    Last edited by Tinuz; 03-27-09 at 12:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    I'd go with DT Champion 2.0 spokes, but it all sounds good. My first build was a Wolber Alpine 32h rim to an IRO high flange fix/fix hub, 3 cross with DT Champion 2.0 spokes. Used my Minoura Pro truing stand to finish things off.
    I'm not a huge fan of the Open Pro rim because I think it's loud. The DT RR1.1 is a quiter rim, and a little bit lighter if you get the single eyeletted version.

    - Sheldon Brown's wheelbuilding guide made the lacing process simple.
    - Don't forget to stress the wheel by placing it hub-side on the ground and pressing down on the rim to settle the spokes. Flip, repeat, and throw it back on the stand for a final truing.
    - If you don't want to spend $$ on a tensiometer, use a reference wheel with the same spokes as a tone guide. Tension the new wheel until a plucked spoke sounds the same as one on the reference wheel. (I've got 1000s of miles on wheels I've built this way, no problems with them, and I weigh 250 pounds.)
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  3. #3
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinuz View Post
    Okay, I most probably ****ed my rear hub and since it is on a cheap rim, I am going to replace the whole lot and build it myself.

    The hub will be a Surly New Rear track hub, 32H laced into a Mavic Open Pro rim 700c/23 with some Wheelsmith Straight 2.0 (294mm ) Spokes and matching nipples. The Cog and Lockring will both be Surly as well, just to ensure a proper fit.

    The aim of this wheel is to be used in non-competitive road riding. Thus, weight is not so much an issue but durability is.
    Any suggestions? Easy upgrades? Stupid things, bad matches or whatever in there? Or am I good to go with this stuff?

    EDIT: Seems if I go to a different store, I can swap the Surly parts out with Shimano Durace, better or worse?
    I have four comments, based on my own experience building wheels.

    1. The Open Pro rim is a good rim, but its reputation is inflated. If you like Open Pro's, then thats fine. But don't buy it based on reputation. There are many rims that are just as good, if not better, and not as expensive.

    2. Don't get straight gauge spokes. Get Wheelsmith double butted spokes. DB14s don't cost much more than straight gauge spokes, but your wheel will be both lighter and more durable as a result. Butted spokes are a win/win situation.

    2. Surly hubs are good hubs, but the bearings and hardware are more difficult to adjust and are a big pain in the ass. Dura Ace hubs are good too, but looseball and cost way too much. The truth is you will not get significant gains in performance or durability over a baseline $40 Formula hub. Read this thread..the truth about hubs

    3. You don't need to match brand names of hubs, cogs and lockrings. Just because Surly puts its stamp on all three does not mean they are more compatable with eachother than with other brands. Dura Ace cogs and lockrings are the best bang for your buck...I've used them on surly hubs too. Unless you want more than 16T, then go with Bens, EAI, or Surly.

    4. Good luck...use good instructions, take your time, and you'll end up with great wheel. Building wheels is the last frontier of the home bike mechanic, and once you get into it, wheels are infinitely fascinating.

  4. #4
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    First, thanks for the replies so far! As said, first build and not terribly certain about what to put together. But damn excited about it

    Quote Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
    I have four comments, based on my own experience building wheels.

    1. The Open Pro rim is a good rim, but its reputation is inflated. If you like Open Pro's, then thats fine. But don't buy it based on reputation. There are many rims that are just as good, if not better, and not as expensive.
    As with everything. I have an open pro on my front wheel and like it very much, it is rather light and have no real complaints about it. Besides, I can get one for 45 bucks...so yeah, why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
    2. Surly hubs are good hubs, but the bearings and hardware are more difficult to adjust and are a big pain in the ass. Dura Ace hubs are good too, but looseball and cost way too much. The truth is you will not get significant gains in performance or durability over a baseline $40 Formula hub. Read this thread..the truth about hubs
    The reason for going with a Durace hub instead of surly is because of shipping. If I buy the aforementioned rim, I can get the Durace hub and still come out way cheaper (150 vs 220 ex shipping). Also, I will be leaving this continent in a few months and am doubting whether to bring my bike or not (on some airlines it is rather cheap or even free). So there is some consideration for resale value and in the end, that partly depends on the brand names.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    I'm not a huge fan of the Open Pro rim because I think it's loud. The DT RR1.1 is a quiter rim, and a little bit lighter if you get the single eyeletted version.

    - Don't forget to stress the wheel by placing it hub-side on the ground and pressing down on the rim to settle the spokes. Flip, repeat, and throw it back on the stand for a final truing.
    - If you don't want to spend $$ on a tensiometer, use a reference wheel with the same spokes as a tone guide. Tension the new wheel until a plucked spoke sounds the same as one on the reference wheel. (I've got 1000s of miles on wheels I've built this way, no problems with them, and I weigh 250 pounds.)
    Loud? What do you mean?

    The spoke tension by sound thing is a great idea, I've never seen that one.

  6. #6
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    Also, Sheldon's section on wheelbuilding is a good primer.

    I think the best advice overall for a beginner is to be patient and take your time.

  7. #7
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    careful not to cross spokes over the valve stem hole, or the wheel will be a pain in the ass to use.
    .....................and for extra credit, line up the hub brand logo so you can see it through the valve stem hole.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Or this book...


    I have both books. I like the lacing guidelines in the Schraner book better, but both are fascinating to read.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnyland View Post
    ....and for extra credit, line up the hub brand logo so you can see it through the valve stem hole.
    and then you have to put the tire's logo where the valve stem is...its the small details that count

  10. #10
    Bill
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    Double butted spokes, tension set near the rim manuf high recommendation, even spoke tension, and a properly stressed build will lead to trhe most durable wheel.

    I personally am a believer in a tension meter if you care about the quality of your build. Many feel otherwise and that's OK for them. For me I want to know what the tension is not just the relative tension compared to some unknown 'standard'. I do use sound during the build process but set tension by meter.
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