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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Single Speed Concept/Question.

    Just ordered an IRO Model 19, their rigid, single speed, 29er mountain bike. I'm psyched about going single speed but a little anxious too. I've depended on gears, especially for mountain biking, for 10 years now. In addition, I haven't ridden single speed since my BMX days of the early to mid 80's. Also, I'll move the choice parts from my 26er over to this one and, ultimately, it will be my only mountain bike for the forseeable future so, it's gotta work for me. I considered the type of riding I do most of the time (hilly, single track, mostly xc-type stuff) and opted for the 33t by 18t option. I like the idea of focussing on the ride over the technology but want to make sure I got enough {gear** to ride rather than push. Don't want to hurt my I also want the bike's gearing to help make me an even stronger rider, make me work. I guess I could install a geared hub or have a der. hanger welded on if I get desperate but, I think, the art of the single speed is nullified by extra stuff hanging from the bike. I suppose the solution that maintains the essense of this concept is to work with rings/cogs to find the right gear for the ride. Do you guys buy and bring extra cogs or wheelsets that you can change either before or during a ride depending on conditions and the way you feel on a given day? Or, do you leave your ratios static, just pump harder and/or push. I'm curious and looking for the most practical solution that doesn't point back to gears.
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  2. #2
    Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjw16 View Post
    I think, the art of the single speed is nullified by extra stuff hanging from the bike.

    I'm curious and looking for the most practical solution that doesn't point back to gears.
    Riding a single speed cause you think the art of the bike is ruined with gears is stupid.

    I don't think changing your gearing on the trail is going to happen much but if you have a flip flop it's not completely out of the question if you have long climbs. If you want to spend more money white industries makes double cogs. Remember though your gearing is limited by how far you can move the wheel without ****ing up brake alignment. MTBing isn't like track racing and I don't think it's really practical to switch gears regularly.

    I keep a single gear on my bike which is high enough that I can force my way up most stuff while still enjoying the flats. For rides that I wouldn't enjoy with that gear I have a geared bike.

  3. #3
    unofficial
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    i leave my gearing static and push through the hard stuff
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  4. #4
    Live without dead time
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    Set your gearing up on the low side so that as you become a better cyclist you can learn to spin faster for speed, rather than setting your gearing high in the hopes your legs will get stronger and you can mash up hills.

    My next wheel set is going to be fixed on both sides of the rear hub so that if there's ever a day of really strong headwinds I can flip over to a lower gear.
    Rich

  5. #5
    cherish the day buck65's Avatar
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    All of my riding is done on the streets, albeit quite hilly in the areas I ride. Perhaps my experiences can be of some help to the OP.

    When getting in going FG/SS, I started with the some "popular" target gear inch numbers and then chose parts accordingly (gear inches --> 70", 65", 60"). I then went with a 42 up front and a 16 in the rear, bought a couple bigger freewheels a month or two later, then finally settled on a 45 tooth chain ring after that. It took a couple of months, but I finally figured out what type of gearing I liked depending on what type of road conditions and tires I happened to be using at the time.

    I'm sure the 33/18 you've chosen will be good for the climbs you plan to do, but you'll probably be coasting during your entire decent. It's kind of nice to have a number of parts available to change things up between rides.

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