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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 05-22-09, 01:55 PM   #1
coolkid_cody
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effects of skidding

what are the effects of skidding on your fixed gear bike? I'm sure it's not too good for your frame and other components to suddenly sieze up your wheel/ cranks, and I'v never read anything about the effects of skidding... Inform.
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Old 05-22-09, 01:56 PM   #2
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your bike will ooze machismo.
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Old 05-22-09, 01:58 PM   #3
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hard on chain, cog/lockring/hub, bottom bracket, tire, knees, etc.
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Old 05-22-09, 02:43 PM   #4
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most notable effects are obviously gonna be on your tires. but i would guess that most of the other components on your bike can easily withstand the amount of force you are exerting on them while skidding.
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Old 05-22-09, 03:51 PM   #5
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of course tires. has anybodys components straight up broken or been bent from excesive skidding
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Old 05-22-09, 03:59 PM   #6
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Depends. If you're smooth, things last longer. If you beat on the bike, things break faster.
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Old 05-22-09, 06:03 PM   #7
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Seat stays.
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Old 05-22-09, 06:04 PM   #8
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your bike will ooze street cred.
fixed
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Old 05-22-09, 06:15 PM   #9
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Skidding exerts no more force on the bike frame than any other strenuous exertion (mashing the pedals for example). It is easier on the seat stays than braking with rim brakes would be. The only thing that takes greater force is the lock ring and the tire due to the fixed pattern (skidding using brakes would spread the wear more evenly.
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Old 05-22-09, 06:49 PM   #10
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Skidding exerts no more force on the bike frame than any other strenuous exertion (mashing the pedals for example). It is easier on the seat stays than braking with rim brakes would be. The only thing that takes greater force is the lock ring and the tire due to the fixed pattern (skidding using brakes would spread the wear more evenly.
any way you can prove this or did you pull this out of your @$$?
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Old 05-22-09, 06:56 PM   #11
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any way you can prove this or did you pull this out of your @$$?
I am just going to copy this sentence and paste it into every single thread on BFSSFG.
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Old 05-22-09, 07:01 PM   #12
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stripped threads for ****ty hubs
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Old 05-22-09, 07:23 PM   #13
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stripped threads for ****ty hubs
99% of the time stripped threads are from improper threading of the cog/lockring or failure to use enough grease.
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Old 05-22-09, 07:24 PM   #14
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any way you can prove this or did you pull this out of your @$$?
Take some physics lessons, and understand how a bicycle works.
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Old 05-22-09, 08:05 PM   #15
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I've annihilated a chainring skidding.
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Old 05-22-09, 11:49 PM   #16
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any way you can prove this or did you pull this out of your @$$?
Couple of principles. Skidding tires impart less resistance than rolling tires (basic physics).
The energy used to resist skidding is provided by your legs. Your legs also supply energy for accelerating your bike. The energy for pedaling forward strongly is the same as the energy available for resisting the motion. Thus no more force is put on the bike while skidding than while stomping on the pedals going forward.

Further, chain tension created by typical FG is substantially lower than that generated by using a low gear on a mountain bike. Chain tension is inversely proportional to gear inches. Low gear inches mean higher potential for heavy stresses on chain - hub - bottom bracket. The chain tension required to skid a FG bike is less than half of what you would get hillclimbing in a granny gear.

Seat stays on a fixed gear have only axial stress. Braking instead of skidding adds a load perpendicular to the seat stay. This stress is much tougher on the frame than an axial stress.

So bottom bracket is experiencing lower forces than typical geared bikes and no different during skidding than when mashing hard. Seat stays have minimal stress. Chain tension on cog and chainring is lower than geared bikes and no different than when mashing.

The only thing that is stressed more is your inseam as you stretch to impale your balls on your stem.

This is basic physics people. Think about it.
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Old 05-23-09, 11:55 AM   #17
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this is basic physics people. Think about it.
but that makes me tired!
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Old 05-23-09, 01:52 PM   #18
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99% of the time stripped threads are from improper threading of the cog/lockring or failure to use enough grease.
I'd second that with some improper tightening of the lock ring which could allow the cog to untighten/tighten with every skid, eventually leading to hub thread/lockring failure.

When installing your cog, grease the threads, carefully start on the threads, then back out slightly to make sure you are aligned on the threads. Tighten pretty well but not gorilla tight. Repeat for lockring.

Ride the bike around the block. Give it a couple of skids. If you feel any movement at all, time to tighten everything down again; maybe get your girlfriend to help.

Another test ride; everything should be right as rain.
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Old 05-23-09, 10:15 PM   #19
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If you skid too hard your chain will stretch and fall off, causing death.
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Old 05-23-09, 10:26 PM   #20
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headaches, nausea, itchy skin, vaginal bleeding, anal leakage.
if you experience an erection lasting more than four hours, see your doctor.
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Old 05-24-09, 10:23 AM   #21
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headaches, nausea, itchy skin, vaginal bleeding, anal leakage.
if you experience an erection lasting more than four hours, see your doctor.
That's not the kind of skidding the poster was talking about!
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Old 05-24-09, 10:31 AM   #22
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any way you can prove this or did you pull this out of your @$$?
can i use this as part of my sig?
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Old 05-24-09, 10:36 AM   #23
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You are stopping the rear wheel via use of your legs which are providing the same action as any rear brake but because you are going to unload the rear wheel to do this you are actually subjecting the bike to less stress.

A coaster brake would be the closest comparison as you also need to reverse and stop the chain.

Bikes are designed for this.

It's hell on tyres though.
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Old 06-03-09, 06:18 PM   #24
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i'm jacking this thread because this seems like a good place to ask my question. and i dont' want to starta new thread. . .

My rear tire is starting to wear down from the occasional skid. i'm a little broke a the moment and can't afford new tires just yet. would it be a bad idea to switch my front tire with my rear one to wear that one out first before i buy new tires? do any of you do this to save a couple bucks?
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Old 06-03-09, 06:24 PM   #25
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i'm jacking this thread because this seems like a good place to ask my question. and i dont' want to starta new thread. . .

My rear tire is starting to wear down from the occasional skid. i'm a little broke a the moment and can't afford new tires just yet. would it be a bad idea to switch my front tire with my rear one to wear that one out first before i buy new tires? do any of you do this to save a couple bucks?
that's a pretty darn lousy idea

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-rotation.html


don't worry, you're not the first to have it though, and at least you were smart enough to ask. Better than me the first time, front tires failing unexpectedly on descents can be very bad
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