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  1. #1
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    Wheel question...

    I'm a commuter and have been having issues finding decent wheels. At 250lbs I need to find a set of wheels that will hold up to the 65-150 miles per week that I bike. I will admit that my last set of wheels are Alex R450s and I busted a spoke on them this week after only 300 miles. Not really that much of a surprise.

    I am contemplating a set of Velocity Deep V's with 36h and Formula hubs. What do you all think?

  2. #2
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    before anyone else says,

    mavic open pros

  3. #3
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    ya Deep V's are very strong. Especially if they are hand built and tensioned properly, they can be pretty much indestructable.

  4. #4
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haagenize View Post
    before anyone else says,

    mavic open pros
    no, at his weight, open pro won't hold up too well.

    his initial 36h deepV would be much better.


    I recommend 14/15/14ga. double butted DT competition spokes.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  5. #5
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    Thanks all!

  6. #6
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haagenize View Post
    before anyone else says,

    mavic open pros
    Why do people keep recommending a mediocre rim that's really expensive for no reason? There are much stronger and better rims out there that are much cheaper. Alex DA28 for one. The R450 should've held up if the wheels were actually properly handbuilt by a profesional mechanic. Alex makes some **** rims, but those aren't one of them.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    The strength of the wheel has a lot to do with how well it was built. A reasonably deep 36h rim (deepv, DA28, CXP33, etc.) should last you a long time as long as you make sure the spokes are properly tensioned.

  8. #8
    Senior Member the_don's Avatar
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    I second the opinion that his rims are fine. It's just that they were not built properly. Get a spoke tool and watch a few tutorials on youtube about how to keep your wheel true and tensioned properly. It's not the rim that made you snap a spoke, it's who built it and who maintained it.

    I sold a bike to a friend, it had shimano r550's on it (machine built, but still pretty good), I had it for about 2 years, I checked the spokes about once a month and tightened and adjusted where necessary. After 1 year of him riding it, he has 3 snapped spokes and somehow half of one of his pedals missing. The scary thing is that he didn't even know that he was missing spokes. I had to tell him!!!

    of course rims make a difference, but for road applications, we don't need Mavic Deemax strength!

  9. #9
    Pants are for suckaz HandsomeRyan's Avatar
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    If you are breaking spokes the problem is likely tension or trueness of the wheels unless you are riding really hard (hopping curbs and whatnot). I'm as big as you are and I almost never break spokes even on my cheaper wheels if they are kept true and tensioned. There is nothing wrong with wanting nicer/stronger wheels but even cheap wheels should not be regularly breaking spokes if they are set up correctly and you don't urban mountain bike with them.

  10. #10
    Senior Member the_don's Avatar
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    exactly. People seem to equate cheap wheels with weak wheels. There are lots of cheap wheels that can last, as long as you know how to take care of them. And wheels are surprisingly easy to take care of.

    Even jumping curbs should be no problem. You should be able to hit a curb by accident head on without breaking a spoke if it's spokes are kept tight. (I have)

  11. #11
    old legs
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    Take them to your LBS and have them rebuild the wheels

  12. #12
    mogul
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    you should check out velocity chukkers,its a new rim that is designed for tricksters,even if you arent tricking,it is definitely made to take a beating. it can take a wider tire as well.

  13. #13
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Everyone's so quick to go with a 36h deep section rolling brick when it's totally unnecessary. I'm 230 pounds now, but I've been as much as 255. I ride nothing but handbuilt 32h wheels. My fixed wheelset is a pair of 1991 Wolber T410 Alpines on 105sc front and IRO high flange rear, 3 cross with DT 14g spokes. Even after a hard climbing century, they were true as the day I built them. On my brevet bike I use DT RR1.1's built 3 cross with the same spokes; I've got over 6000 miles on my front and 3000 on the rear. The rear replaced an Alex DA16 which lasted until I wore out the braking surface.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  14. #14
    Turgid Member TofuPowered's Avatar
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    I weigh between 240 and 250 and never have a problem with my spokes snapping. really wondering what you're doing to your wheels. the only problem i ever have is with stripping hubs, but with the wheels i'm currently building this will no longer be an issue (thanx level hubs). i've ridden good semi-expensive wheels and somewhat cheap wheels. currently on weinmanns because, honestly, the price was right when i needed them. no real problems with them.

  15. #15
    Senior Member beeftech's Avatar
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    Take the Open Pro advice.
    Lace them 4x if your really worried about strength.

  16. #16
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeftech View Post
    Take the Open Pro advice.
    Lace them 4x if your really worried about strength.
    only if it's low flange and 36h.

    sun ringle CR-18 is a stronger rim, so are the deep-v and alex r450.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  17. #17
    Senior Member beeftech's Avatar
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    You can lace 4x on high flange(not easily though). true about the 36h though.

  18. #18
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    I'd go with the Velocity Chukker or Dyad rims. They can take wider tires which will give you a much nicer ride on your commute.

    If you want to outdo the Deep-V crowd, try the Velocity B43 rim.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TofuPowered View Post
    I weigh between 240 and 250 and never have a problem with my spokes snapping. really wondering what you're doing to your wheels. the only problem i ever have is with stripping hubs, but with the wheels i'm currently building this will no longer be an issue (thanx level hubs). i've ridden good semi-expensive wheels and somewhat cheap wheels. currently on weinmanns because, honestly, the price was right when i needed them. no real problems with them.
    It's not that I'm do anything particularily harsh on purpose, but I live in New Orleans where the potholes are plentiful and extremely harsh sometimes.

  20. #20
    . bbattle's Avatar
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    I'd definitely take a look at some wider tires, then. When I lived in New Orleans, the roads were mostly potholes. All over town. Worst streets ever.

  21. #21
    Beausage is Beautiful Fugazi Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    double butted...spokes
    I cannot emphasis enough how good of an idea this is. Double butted spokes are awesome - I don't know why the hell more people don't build with/ride them.

    Also, +1 on the Sun CR-18. In general, Sun Ringle makes some of the best, strongest, and most absurdly underrated rims out there.

    Finally, a good builder is worth his weight in gold. Find a good wheel guy, pay a little extra, and get way better wheels.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plunk25 View Post
    I am contemplating a set of Velocity Deep V's with 36h and Formula hubs. What do you all think?
    If you came to me I'd recommend Velocity Dyad rims.

    I laced up a set for our tandem. After tensioning they required virtually no trueing at all. I've never had that happen before. They also weigh 40 g less than the deep V's.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeftech View Post
    Take the Open Pro advice.
    Lace them 4x if your really worried about strength.
    So how does 4x make them stronger?

  24. #24
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    So how does 4x make them stronger?
    In principle it spreads the forces out more? I assumed that every place the spokes touch each other is an opportunity to send a bit of the force down another spoke. Is this not right?

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  25. #25
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgedwa View Post
    In principle it spreads the forces out more? I assumed that every place the spokes touch each other is an opportunity to send a bit of the force down another spoke. Is this not right?
    They really only touch one another at the last cross where they are interlaced.

    The good thing about crossed spoke wheels is the spokes leave the hub at a tangent. That lets them carry torque loads to the rim and it lets them pull against more material between the spoke hole and edge of the hub flange.

    More crosses isn't always better. Too many crosses will make the shank of one spoke cross over the head of the adjacent spoke and be hard to lace. Too many crosses also make the spokes enter the rim at too much of an angle which can cause the spokes to break at the nipple.

    With typical size hub flanges and 26" or 700c rims I generally build 24 and 28 spoke wheels 2x, 32 and 36 spoke wheels 3x, 40 spoke wheels 4x, and 48 spoke wheels 5x.

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