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  1. #1
    Senior Member 41ants's Avatar
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    Looking for a strong wheelset

    As the title states; I am looking for a replacement wheelset to my factory ones that came with my bianchi pista. I would state strength is more important than low weight. I would like to have a freewheel option as well and flashy color options is NOT important. I am approaching 230# uhhh, thanksgiving.

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    dt 1.2 rims, dt spokes, and the hub of your choice

  3. #3
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    go for formula hubs unless you insist upon spending more money, you probably won't notice the difference.

    maybe even go for 36 hole.

    try and find a reliable local wheel builder who will stand by their work.

  4. #4
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    You'll likely get better results asking in the clydes forum.
    1988 Miele Azsora

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    Senior Member the_don's Avatar
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    formula hubs/deep v rims.

    can't go wrong.

    build local or get cheap on net and have a local mech tension them for you.

  6. #6
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Wheel "strength" has more to do with the quality of the build and less to do with the parts. Just about any 28-36 spoke wheelset will suit you fine if its built properly. Just stay away from ultralight rims that are 400 gms or fewer.

    Whats your budget? The options are limitless, but if you want the best custom wheel for as little money as possible, I suggest lacing a pair of Alex 28mm rims to Formula (Harris, IRO, etc.) or Novatec (Dimension, Ben's, etc) hubs using DT or Wheelsmith double butted spokes. Of course you can buy more expensive parts, but won't really improve the durability.

    If you buy prebuilts, regardless of what you buy, take them to a LBS that employs a competent wheelbuilder. Specifically ask them to "stress relieve and retension the wheel for you". In my experience, not all LBS's are competent with wheels, so you might want to ask around a bit first. Or, if you feel up to it, buy a spoke wrench, read directions on Sheldonbrown.com and do it yourself. It is not difficult, it just requires patience, and when done correctly, the wheel will stay true for its entire life.

    I cannot emphasize this enough...most wheelsets die premature deaths because of the inadequate and/or uneven tension, and it has little to do with the number of spokes or the strength of the individual parts. At your weight, the best thing you can do is take matters into your own hands and learn how to manage the spoke tension of your wheels, or find someone you can trust to do it right the first time.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by mihlbach; 11-30-09 at 07:33 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member 41ants's Avatar
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    Thanks. THis is helpful information. I do a fair amount of off road cycling, so I am sure I could have my MTB wheel builder lace up a set of road wheels... Otherwise, there is SS/FG shop that isn't too far from my house. At least now I have some solid info walking into the door and don't have to worry about getting raped.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtgotsjets View Post
    You'll likely get better results asking in the clydes forum.
    Not necessarily. If you read wheel threads in the clyde forum (as I have) they almost always recommend wheelsets meant for a brontosaurus...such as a tandem or 29er rim with 36-48 spokes, everything 4x, with heavy duty spokes, and huge tires.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
    Wheel "strength" has more to do with the quality of the build and less to do with the parts. Just about any 28-36 spoke wheelset will suit you fine if its built properly. Just stay away from ultralight rims that are 400 gms or fewer.

    Good luck!
    This is true, but a well built wheelset with burlier parts will still be stronger than a well built wheelset with lighter parts.

    OP, as a big dude you might look into building a wheelset with touring or 29er xc rims. They are specifically designed to take lots of weight and/ or abuse. Mavic a719s are pretty much top of the line in this class of rims, as are Salsa Delgados. Mavic a319s are a cheaper, slightly heavier but still super strong option. There's lots more to choose from in this class too.

    I think you won't go wrong building something with 36 spokes, at least in the back. The weight of those extra 4 spokes will buy you a lot more strength.

    And mihlbach, have you considered that clydes may recommend this stuff for a reason?

  10. #10
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mander View Post
    This is true, but a well built wheelset with burlier parts will still be stronger than a well built wheelset with lighter parts.

    OP, as a big dude you might look into building a wheelset with touring or 29er xc rims. They are specifically designed to take lots of weight and/ or abuse. Mavic a719s are pretty much top of the line in this class of rims, as are Salsa Delgados. Mavic a319s are a cheaper, slightly heavier but still super strong option. There's lots more to choose from in this class too.

    I think you won't go wrong building something with 36 spokes, at least in the back. The weight of those extra 4 spokes will buy you a lot more strength.

    And mihlbach, have you considered that clydes may recommend this stuff for a reason?
    HAHA! Thanks for proving my point!
    Because many of them weigh well over 300 lbs...thats why. Most normal SS/FG wheelsets can easily withstand 230 pounds when built correctly. Once you have a wheelset that is sufficiently strong for the rider, the next concern is durability and that is mostly determined by spoke tension. You can increase durability somewhat by increasing the number of spokes, using double butted spokes, and using taller rims (which I did recommend), but spoek tension is the most important. A 28-32/32-36 spoke wheelset with DB spokes and a 25-30mm deep rim is more than adequate for the OP. If the OP wants to keep the bike reasonably light and swift, there is simply no benefit to overbuilding the wheel with tandem/29er rims.
    At any rate, I'm not even sure if the Pista has clearance for giant clyde rims and tires.
    Last edited by mihlbach; 11-30-09 at 07:59 AM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member 41ants's Avatar
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    The 29er rims might be a bit beefier than I need. I will keep those for my trail bike. Also, I am hoping to start leaning out a bit as the cooler weather in FL makes for longer days in the saddle.

    mihlbach, you are spot on about the build. My hardtail 29er mtb wheels have been true for well over a year of beating and that is credit to my builder

  12. #12
    Senior Member mihlbach's Avatar
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    Wheels are fascinating. They are one area where you have the ability to choose exactly what is best suited to the individual rider. With the exception of custom frames, you don't really have that luxury with other components.

  13. #13
    Gentlemen. ADSR's Avatar
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    I'm right about that weight and have been doing just fine with my wheels from Prowheelbuilder.com. Velocity Deep V in back, Fusion up front, both 32 spokes. If you've got a local guy I'd just go there and see what he can set you up with.
    The bums will always lose.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mihlbach View Post
    HAHA! Thanks for proving my point!
    Because many of them weigh well over 300 lbs...thats why. Most normal SS/FG wheelsets can easily withstand 230 pounds when built correctly. Once you have a wheelset that is sufficiently strong for the rider, the next concern is durability and that is mostly determined by spoke tension. You can increase durability somewhat by increasing the number of spokes, using double butted spokes, and using taller rims (which I did recommend), but spoek tension is the most important. A 28-32/32-36 spoke wheelset with DB spokes and a 25-30mm deep rim is more than adequate for the OP. If the OP wants to keep the bike reasonably light and swift, there is simply no benefit to overbuilding the wheel with tandem/29er rims.
    At any rate, I'm not even sure if the Pista has clearance for giant clyde rims and tires.
    Sorry if i stepped on your toes mihilbach. It does however say Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) right in the name of the forum. It bears pointing out that a fixed rear wheel with no dish will be a lot stronger than a dished 9+ speed wheel, which is probably the point of reference of a lot of people in the clyde forum.

    The a719 and Delgado are not rediculously hefty rims; they're about 550 grams, which is a bit more than a veep and about one Ritter Sport heavier than an open pro. They will take 28's, which a pista can fit. I have a 9 speed 3x a719 wheelset on one of my bikes (a commuter and part time load hauler) and I wouldn't call it unreasonably heavy or slow for normal road riding.

    Anyways, I was just putting this out for 41ants as something to consider. I agree with you that open pros or similar 450ish gram rims will be fine if built well. But i still maintain that adding 200+ grams of rim to the wheelset would not be an unreasonable tradeoff.
    Last edited by mander; 11-30-09 at 10:43 AM.

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