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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 12-02-09, 09:11 PM   #1
cave12man
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Vintage Marukin to single speed?

ok kill me because im sure this has been done before. i have an older marukin m-410 that i want to convert to singlespeed. ive been reading a lot of posts on how to do this but havent been able to get any definites down.

can anyone lead me in the right direction?

what are steps involved?
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Old 12-02-09, 11:25 PM   #2
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I wrote "road bike conversion to fixed gear" in google! this is the first link i found: http://www.ehow.com/how_14191_convert-bike-fixed.html


there it is the infos:

Instructions

Step 1
Understand that you will need a bike with horizontal dropouts. Many road bikes from the 1980s and earlier have these dropouts, so they are excellent candidates for fixed gear bikes.

Step 2
Remove your derailleurs, derailleur cables, shifters, etc. Hey, your bike just lost about two pounds!

Step 3
Convert your cranks. Remove your big chainring and bolt the small chainring back on with single or 'shorty' chainring bolts.

Step 4
Convert your rear wheel. If you have a freewheel hub, you can remove the freewheel and thread on a cog. You may want to consider using a lockring to hold the cog in place, and you may want to switch to a solid axle. Otherwise, it is best to buy a track hub or a flip flop hub and build up a new wheel.

Step 5
Adjust the chain tension by moving the wheel back and forth in the dropouts. You want the chain fairly tight, but it shouldn't bind in any position.

Step 6
Check your chainline. Your front chainring must line up with the cog in back.

Step 7
Keep your brakes. Some people remove both brakes or the rear brake to get a cleaner look. But in the real world, it's nice to have the stopping power of two brakes.



If there is some words than you dont know what it is, wright it in to "Google" you may find some good infos!
If you need infos about install 700c wheels on your 27" wheels frame do the same thing!
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Old 12-03-09, 08:18 AM   #3
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awesome thanks! guess i didnt try hard enough as you so well pointed out! ;-)

now is this for single speed or fixed gear? i still want to coast but dont want all the added weight of the derailleurs n such. i think maybe thats where im getting confused.
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Old 12-03-09, 10:34 AM   #4
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If you want a singlespeed, you just can remove your "5 or 6 speeds" free wheel (you can go to your LBS if you dont have the tool) and install a one gear free wheel (install does not requiered any tools)

(you have to choose how many tooth you prefer "your favorite ratio"... do the test with your bike first and count how much tooth on your favorite gear.) link: http://www.aboc.com.au/tips-and-hint...ike-gear-chart

If you want a fixed gear, you will have to change your rear wheel and buy a track or flip/flop style back wheel (this is simple) you will need to adjust your brake if you buy a 700c and the original is 27".

You can also just change the hub of your 27" wheel, but this is to complicated or just you need patience, time and do some research!


Have fun!
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Old 12-03-09, 01:35 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tremdo View Post
...


Step 3
Convert your cranks. Remove your big chainring and bolt the small chainring back on with single or 'shorty' chainring bolts.
...
This sort of depends on how big those chainrings are, how hilly or flat your terrain is and some other factors such as prevailing winds and traffic (or the lack thereof).

I left the big ring (50 teeth) on the used Sugino cranks I just installed. The middle ring was 42 teeth and that is just too small. I have a 16t cog on the hub. I am considering getting a 46t given the amount of stop and go I have to do on my urban commute.

This list is great in that it is simple, but this point gets specific and I think it is too specific.
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Old 12-03-09, 02:41 PM   #6
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Thanks again for the replies. Ill be heading to my LBS tonight to grab a removal tool and a new free wheel. I commute in Philly so any hills are pretty much non-existent and it's only about a 2 mile commute so I need something a little lighter and faster. Figured removing some of this weight and going single speed would partly do the trick and I never shift now anyways so what the hell.

Thanks again.
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Old 12-03-09, 03:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
I left the big ring (50 teeth) on the used Sugino cranks I just installed. The middle ring was 42 teeth and that is just too small. I have a 16t cog on the hub. I am considering getting a 46t given the amount of stop and go I have to do on my urban commute
I understand that to (i prefer the big ring to) but you have to remove the crank to take the small ring off (or you cut it, mean destroy it!) (and there is some crank than you just cant take the rings out, its one piece). So you need a new crank!

There is much more kind of things that depend of components!

Quote:
This sort of depends on how big those chainrings are, how hilly or flat your terrain is and some other factors such as prevailing winds and traffic (or the lack thereof)
Quote:
(you have to choose how many tooth you prefer "your favorite ratio"... do the test with your bike first and count how much tooth on your favorite gear.) link: http://www.aboc.com.au/tips-and-hint...ike-gear-chart

Last edited by Tremdo; 12-03-09 at 03:36 PM. Reason: more infos
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Old 12-03-09, 03:36 PM   #8
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I keep reading the title as "Vintage Merkin to single speed?"

That's all, carry on.
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