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  1. #1
    Shadow Member simple312's Avatar
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    Fixed/free (w/flipflop hub) rear wheel alignment tips?

    Hello. Sorry if this is off topic. I checked out the maintenance section and it didn't seem to deal with many ss/fixed issues. Its also a bit long, the question is at the bottom.

    I just got a KHS flite100 this past weekend. Its set up with the stock flip flop hub, fixed & free wheel on alternate sides. I've had an old touring bike that was converted to SS for the past 6 years. It had semi horizontal drops that were normal road bike drops, so the wheel moved toward the center of the bike to come off. The KHS has normal track horizontal drops exiting away from the center of the bike.

    I learned very quickly that its much more difficult to take the real wheel off on a track frame. The other big difference is that like most (or all) track frames the axles have fixed bolts rather than quick release. (My old bike had a quick release).

    I could get the rear wheel on my old bike aligned easily, but w/o the quick release its much more difficult and I'm not sure if i have it lined up right or not. Its pretty close but there seems to be a bit of friction when turning the pedals backwards. I also notice that it gets rather sensitive with the break pads. Just a bit off and the rub.

    I was thinking that would eventually learn to ride it fixed but the difficulty turning the wheel around, it may not happen after all.

    Any good tips to be sure my rear wheel is in proper alignment with a flip flop hub (w/o quick release)?
    or is it just a mater of practice?


    Thanks for the help.
    Christian

  2. #2
    Bike Evangelist Boss Hogg's Avatar
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    The best way to line up everything is to flip the bike over on to it's seat and look from the back of the wheel to the seat post tube on the frame. If the wheel is centered properly, the wheel, seat tube post and head tube should all line up. I keep my axle nuts just loose enough to move the wheel. If you tighten up the chain too much when using a SS freewheel it can bind up and wear out too fast. Trial and error is the best method for each bike. I set mine up so the cranks go around a couple of times if I give the crank a spin with my hand but without excess slop in the chain

  3. #3
    I need more bikes!!! Mr. Shadow's Avatar
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    Ride it fixed-gear for awhile, you won't want to switch it back.

    I don't mess with my rear wheel/ chain any more than necessary, but
    Boss Hogg's post is the way I do it too.
    "We are few now, but one day we will rule." That's what one of my fixies whispered as I walked by. I nodded in agreement, and thanked it for not waking the others.

  4. #4
    Shadow Member simple312's Avatar
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    Thanks. I think that was pretty much want i was doing, might have the chain too tight though.

    I might end up riding fixed at some point but my knees are bad to begin with (old skateboarding accidents). The other thing is that i think either i have the bars too low or too far out, so still need to make adjustments. I'll likely put a new stem on it. It was already switched out once to a shorter one.

    Christian
    Last edited by simple312; 08-25-04 at 12:43 PM.

  5. #5
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boss Hogg View Post
    The best way to line up everything is to flip the bike over on to it's seat and look from the back of the wheel to the seat post tube on the frame. If the wheel is centered properly, the wheel, seat tube post and head tube should all line up. I keep my axle nuts just loose enough to move the wheel. If you tighten up the chain too much when using a SS freewheel it can bind up and wear out too fast. Trial and error is the best method for each bike. I set mine up so the cranks go around a couple of times if I give the crank a spin with my hand but without excess slop in the chain
    You don't need to turn the bike up side down to do all that.


    Yes, I know it's an old thread.....very old....but I just had to comment...
    .cinelli.olympic.surly.long.haul.trucker.kona.ku.surly.steamroller.
    .litespeed.classic.litespeed.firenze.bianchi.pista.dean.colonel.plus.more.

  6. #6
    A guy who rides bikes Aaron_F's Avatar
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    I've been doing it with my bike upright and using a towel between the tire and the seat tube. Today, though, I had the bike upside down while I had the rear wheel off, so I just went ahead and lined it up that way when I put the wheel back on. It was much easier and I got the tension right first try and without a towel.

  7. #7
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    lining up fixed wheel

    I have the same problem but with practice it gets easier. Actually I have an old wooden peg that I have split into its two parts by removing the spring. Each is then a wedge shape. I only use one. I slip it in between the wheel and frame (is it called the rear arm) and it's just the right size. I slip it in one side and I know how far it should slip in. I tighten the wheel a bit and then slip it in the other side to make sure it's equal.

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