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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 04-26-10, 02:51 AM   #1
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Pedal stikes

Do all the track and single speed bikes at bikesdirect have pedal strike issues? I know that technique can over come this issue, i am just curious.
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Old 04-26-10, 02:56 AM   #2
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I've never ever pedal striked on my Windsor.
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Old 04-26-10, 03:00 AM   #3
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Are you having pedal strike issues? With which bike?
I don't think/haven't heard of bikesdirect bikes having pedal strike issues, at least beyond what is normal on a fixie. When I first started riding fixed with platform pedals I had some issues, and that was on a surly steamroller. I just learned to lean less. Only happened like twice.
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Old 04-26-10, 07:13 AM   #4
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Lean angle, crank length, and to some degree, pedal design will affect whether or not you strike. It's not manufacturer specific.
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Old 04-26-10, 07:38 AM   #5
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Pedal "stike" Never heard of it

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Originally Posted by Brian View Post
Lean angle, crank length, and to some degree, pedal design will affect whether or not you strike. It's not manufacturer specific.
Agreed...

Are you possibly meaning "toe lap", your foot hitting the front tire, which can have a relation to your bikes geometry?

Last edited by day1si; 04-26-10 at 07:44 AM.
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Old 04-26-10, 07:50 AM   #6
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I've only ever had a pedal hit the ground once, which was enough for me. But I've scraped the floorboards on touring motorcycles multiple times.
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Old 04-26-10, 07:55 AM   #7
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Frames built for velodrome use tend to have a higher bottom bracket than road bikes for this reason. If you'rew having problems with pedal strike, shorter crank arms can help. Otherwise, take it easy through corners until you learn what works for your bike.
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Old 04-26-10, 08:01 AM   #8
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What exactly does a lower bottom bracket do for a road bike? Is there any advantage to having it lower? I know there's no reason NOT to have it lower since you can just coast through hard turns, but why not have it high even on geared bikes?
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Old 04-26-10, 08:23 AM   #9
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What exactly does a lower bottom bracket do for a road bike? Is there any advantage to having it lower? I know there's no reason NOT to have it lower since you can just coast through hard turns, but why not have it high even on geared bikes?
Seriously?
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Old 04-26-10, 08:25 AM   #10
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Would it be so difficult to answer my question? I don't own a road bike, and I probably don't know what I'm talking about. But can't you come up with a better answer, short of not answering at all?

[Edit] I looked it up. Cheers. Thanks for nothing, though!
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Old 04-26-10, 09:09 AM   #11
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What exactly does a lower bottom bracket do for a road bike? Is there any advantage to having it lower? I know there's no reason NOT to have it lower since you can just coast through hard turns, but why not have it high even on geared bikes?
A high bottom bracket increases standover height. A low bottom bracket improves stability.

HTH...
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Old 04-26-10, 09:20 AM   #12
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A high bottom bracket increases standover height. A low bottom bracket improves stability.

HTH...
at the cost of cornering ability. not that it's a bad thing, either way.
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Old 04-26-10, 10:18 AM   #13
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at the cost of cornering ability. not that it's a bad thing, either way.
On a road bike or SS this isn't an issue, as you can simply hold the inside pedal in the 12 o'clock position. On a fixed gear you don't have this option, so the bottom bracket is raised and the crank arms shortened to compensate.
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Old 04-26-10, 10:41 AM   #14
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at the cost of cornering ability. not that it's a bad thing, either way.
It doesn't cost you any cornering ability. You can turn much, much faster without pedaling on any bike than you can whilst pedaling on a bike with a high bottom bracket.
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Old 04-26-10, 10:49 AM   #15
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Use the ends of your straps as feelers and you'll avoid pedal strike every time.

My clipless setup lets me turn much more sharply also.
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Old 04-26-10, 10:52 AM   #16
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[Edit] I looked it up. Cheers. Thanks for nothing, though!
Maybe the fact it only took you 2 minutes of searching to find out is why he didn't answer...
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Old 04-26-10, 11:08 AM   #17
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Maybe the fact it only took you 2 minutes of searching to find out is why he didn't answer...
Technically about 90% of the issues discussed in this forum can be resolved using a few minutes of searching or a visit to Sheldon Brown. But that doesn't stop people from asking. Sometimes it's nice to just have a real person respond. I don't think "Seriously?" is helpful or constructive in any way, even to a question as common or benign as "What should my first fixed gear be?" or "Do all track bikes have pedal strike issues?"

Honestly, get off your high horse. It's funny the way people complain about the elitist & stuck-up attitude around here, but everyone does it themselves. I'm no exception, but I try not to waste people's time.
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Old 04-26-10, 01:28 PM   #18
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I only struck my pedal once, and that was during cornering when i got too close to the curb and hit it. During normal conditions there shouldn't be a problem, unless you get really super low.
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Old 04-26-10, 01:59 PM   #19
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Honestly, get off your high horse. It's funny the way people complain about the elitist & stuck-up attitude around here, but everyone does it themselves. I'm no exception, but I try not to waste people's time.
The answer to your question was so painfully obvious, I didn't think you were serious.
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Old 04-26-10, 02:18 PM   #20
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I hit the pavement with a pedal at least a couple times a year. It comes from riding too many different bikes.
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Old 04-26-10, 02:38 PM   #21
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Haha i Love forums. I was slightly mistaken. I thought the term applied both to hitting the ground and hitting the tire. I only ask because part of the reason i decided to build up a new bike instead of my bridgestone is that not only is the frame a little too big, but the cranks are long enough that they would hit the ground on steep turns. I am going to keep it as a ss, but i think as a fixie it would be uncomfortable. How about the kilo, will he pedals hit the wheel as it is stock? I test rode a globe roll, and it was very nice, partially because the pedals cleared the tire and the ground with ease. I realize a different crank length could solve this, but i don't really want to go lower than 165. Maybe i is just ignorant, that is why i decided to ask you guys. ( and yes, i have done searches, and most of this information is out there. However it is nice to ask here because its fun to watch people argue in a forum )
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Old 04-26-10, 02:38 PM   #22
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Also i don't have the internet at home and my 9 year old mac book doesn't have wireless. ha!
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Old 04-26-10, 02:41 PM   #23
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Pedal STIKES? What are they and where can I get some!?

*see thread title

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Old 04-26-10, 03:36 PM   #24
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It doesn't cost you any cornering ability. You can turn much, much faster without pedaling on any bike than you can whilst pedaling on a bike with a high bottom bracket.
yes, because it's faster to not pedal through a corner in a crit.
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Old 04-26-10, 06:53 PM   #25
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yes, because it's faster to not pedal through a corner in a crit.
Maybe, but what happened to crit bikes?
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