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  1. #1
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    Mystery Bike: Name the Frame

    So I stumbled upon this bike on craigslist and I have no idea what it is
    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hn...731240136.html


    The seller was previously advertising it as a Cannondale Sampson (yes Sampson not Samson).
    I contacted the seller and found out he knew nothing about the bike.
    I suggested the possibility that it was a track frame just due to the geometry and I received some extra photos from him.





    He also said that the Sampson logo was just a sticker.
    The thing that really confuses me are the dropouts. What are they?!? Singlespeed?

    So basically I would just like any info anyone has on this bike.
    Last edited by satchellmr; 05-13-10 at 03:37 PM. Reason: fixed photos

  2. #2
    Fresh Garbage hairnet's Avatar
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    I believe that was some crit. bike, but I don't remember what it's called. My friend had one with Dura Ace and it was hawt. Maybe ask in Road Cycling too
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I'd rather ride a greasy bowling ball than one of those things.
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  3. #3
    vice campaign arcade's Avatar
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    can't really see the pic too well and the ones you posted aren't working...

    that being said, cannondale's track frames do usually have pretty long track ends, as it kind of looks in the picture. geometry looks fairly tight...

    i dunno about the braze ons though...

    possibly stolen, considering the lack of info on the bike and all, but i'm not putting any weight in that statement because that wouldn't be fair....

    whole lotta help that was...




    EDIT:
    well i don't really know what the hell kinda frame it is to be honest... sorry man...
    Last edited by arcade; 05-13-10 at 04:20 PM.

  4. #4
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    Hey I fixed the photos, want to take a second look? Thanks

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
    I believe that was some crit. bike, but I don't remember what it's called. My friend had one with Dura Ace and it was hawt. Maybe ask in Road Cycling too
    Crit bike?
    Sorry don't know the terminology

  6. #6
    Ride for Life wearyourtruth's Avatar
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    this is a Cannondale 3.0, made from 1989 to 1992ish.

    The 3.0 frame came in two versions, Road Race and Criterium. The Criterium version had steeper angles and a shorter wheelbase. I'm not sure if these differentiation was for all 3.0 model years or just some.

    The 3.0 came out after Cannondale couldn't make a carbon fiber frame. Does anyone remember the ad where they said something like: Cannondale's New Carbon Fiber Bike Has One Big Distinction......and then on the next page it said: Its Aluminum.
    They then went on to say that they couldn't make a carbon bike lighter or ride better than they could with new tube manipulation of aluminum. Remember carbon was young and unknown to most in the bike industry at this time and was likely true.
    The Cannondale 3.0 was born almost as much out of accident as the desire to turn out a state-of-the-art road frame. In any case, it lead Cannondale into an age of computer-optimized, ultra-stiff and light design.

    As the story goes, in the late 80s Cannondale was interested in creating an ultra-light frame made from the relatively new (at least for bicycles) material of carbon fiber. A Stanford-educated contractor was hired to assist in its development. The engineer insisted upon optimizing Cannondale’s existing aluminum frame first as a point of reference (for comparison purposes) for the new carbon frame. He did not receive Cannondale’s blessing to do this, but he did so anyways.

    At the end of this exercise, the engineer reported to the company that by optimizing the existing design, Cannondale could have an aluminum frame that weighed over one pound less while being stiffer and costing just a few more dollars than their existing model. He also concluded that a carbon fiber frame would hold no stiffness or weight advantage over the optimized aluminum frame despite carrying a vastly higher price tag. Ecstatic, C’dale scrapped the carbon fiber program and started producing the 3.0.

    At first the 3.0 road frame was offered in two versions: the Criterium, and the Road Race. Around 1992, the Criterium model was dropped.

    The 3.0 was revolutionary for a number of reasons. In 56 cm size, the 3.0 Criterium weighed only 3.2 lbs. That is lighter than many lower-end frames today (18 years later). Yet, it was the stiffest frame tested by Bicycling Magazine’s “tarantula” test fixture at the time. Indeed, many decried it was “too stiff” for their aching rear ends.

    The Criterium model sported a larger (2″ vs. 1-3/4″) downtube, shorter wheelbase, taller bottom bracket, and steeper head tube than the Road Race. The Road Race had more relaxed European geometry for more stable descending. (Reportedly, the Criterium was nevertheless a very stable descender with quicker turn-in.)

    An identifying feature unique to the 3.0 (and its successor, the 2.8) were cantilevered chainstays. By mating the seatstay with the chainstay about an inch forward of the dropout, the rear trianger was smaller, saving weight and adding stiffness. This design would later be oft-criticized for being “too stiff.”

    Midway through its production (around 1990), the 3.0 was also one of the first frames in industry to have a replaceable rear derailleur hangar. This hangar was designed to break away (and be easily replaced) in the event of a right-side crash, sparing the frame.

    The first few years the 3.0 was produced (1989-1991) the Cannondale decal was affixed to the top tube much like Cannondale’s original frames. In 1991 or ‘92, Cannondale began affixing the decal to the now-familiar location of the downtube.

    Despite being much-maligned for its overly-stiff ride quality, the 3.0 was a state-of-the-art bicycle without a state-of-the-art price tag. It is considered something of a classic today.
    it is a great frame, and while it is prone to cracking near the rear dropouts (i would give it a good look there!) it can still be a nice frame.

    that said, it is not really ideal for a fixed gear. it has vertical dropouts, which require a "magic gear" or an eccentric hub to make it work. it is NOT a track frame. it is a road frame.

    p.s. if you get the serial number off the bottom bracket, you can send it to cannondale and they will tell you the exact year and model of the frame, usually within a few days if you are nice.
    before posting, a "noob" should always ask themselves "could this have been answered by first visiting Sheldon Brown

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  7. #7
    Senior Member the_don's Avatar
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    I know it's a Cannondale road bike 80's-90's.

    Sampson looks like the name of the rider of that bike. So it was probably raced in the past.

    But they are running it single speed now with out a tensioner, so that is a problem.
    Last edited by the_don; 05-13-10 at 04:51 PM.

  8. #8
    The Stark Fist of Reality Scrodzilla's Avatar
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    I know it's blue.

  9. #9
    モㄥ工匕モ 爪モ爪乃モ尺 evilcryalotmore's Avatar
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    I think its been repainted look at the first picture the nut is also blue.

  10. #10
    . bbattle's Avatar
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    Wearyourtruth pegged it.

    Those Cannondales were the reason for the "aluminum is too stiff; the ride is too harsh" stereotype for aluminum frames. Those cantilevered dropouts allowed the chainstays to be very short, making the bike great for criteriums (crits) but too stiff and unforgiving for longer road riding.

    If you ask the Classic and Vintage folks about them, you'll find vicious fans and rabid critics of the bikes.

    As stated earlier, the dropouts were prone to cracking so inspect them closely. I've ridden group rides with a couple of guys who have these bikes and while they've logged many thousands of miles on them, they haven't had any problems so far.

  11. #11
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearyourtruth View Post
    this is a Cannondale 3.0, made from 1989 to 1992ish.
    +1 the seller just has a diff. fork on it obviously since its red lol....

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