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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 08-31-10, 11:29 AM   #1
Dinaars
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Track Hub design

I am studying engineering and have access to lots of machines(cnc) in my university workshop. I was vondering is it possible to build your own track hubs from a block of aluminium. The only thing I need is any blueprints, measurements or any full dimensions of a sealed track hub. Does anybody of you know a link for such drawings? Or maybe somebody has expirience in such activities and could help me?
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Old 08-31-10, 12:47 PM   #2
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sure you could do it
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Old 08-31-10, 12:55 PM   #3
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just because i just registered in this forum means I am not able to do anything? I have restored cars, built bicycles, robots etc. I think i am able to use tools to get thing done. Why not a hub. It's just an aluminium piece with 37 holes and some thread. Just need the drawings.
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Old 08-31-10, 01:11 PM   #4
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If you're really an engineering student and have done the things you say yet can't come up with a basic hub design using CAD software then you should rethink your major.

Edit:

With the negativity out of the way, I'd love to see your eventual design utilizing 37 spokes.

Perhaps you can call it the "Veronica" as a reference to one of Kevin Smiths characters in the film "Clerks".

Last edited by mumblesmumbles; 08-31-10 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 08-31-10, 01:32 PM   #5
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With the negativity out of the way, I'd love to see your eventual design utilizing 37 spokes.

Perhaps you can call it the "Veronica" as a reference to one of Kevin Smiths characters in the film "Clerks".
Not positive but I'm assuming the OP meant 36 holes for spokes and 1 for the bearings/axle. Not 37 spoke holes...

Any whoooo.... Yeah as long as you plan to make the hub yourself why don't you design it yourself to? As a engineering student I'm sure you have access to CAD software.
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Old 08-31-10, 01:58 PM   #6
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Here's some custom tandem hubs made by Canadian mechanic and racer, Doc Morten, back in the 30's out of solid alloy. The hard part will be machining steel races to fit methinks.





I'm guessing these were turned on some sort of milling machine?
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Old 08-31-10, 02:01 PM   #7
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uh... are you studying to be a machinist or an engineer? If the latter, design your own damn hub. It's not that hard.

If you're looking to find dimensions for an existing hub, then copy it, just buy an existing hub.

This is about as basic of a design problem as you'll find. If you can't handle it, I highly suggest finding a different carreer path. The last thing the world needs is another engineer who can't design his way out of a box.

- An Engineer
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Old 08-31-10, 02:03 PM   #8
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I have access to CAD software. I'm using Solid Edge v20 and N6 for CNC machining. I could design a hub myself, but i need some information about thread sizes, sprocket/lockring spacing and bearing placement. Since I don't have a sealed bearing hub close to me, I can't just measure this. The idea is to create just the hub body - all the other parts will be bought.
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Old 08-31-10, 02:21 PM   #9
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Whoah. Post pix when done, I'm interested in seeing this. Sounds cool
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Old 08-31-10, 02:36 PM   #10
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http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-024/000.html


Look about halfway down the page. They have dimensions of a track hub. Not a technical drawing so I'm not sure if it will be very helpful but maybe.
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Old 08-31-10, 02:41 PM   #11
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I understand Dinaars' problem, and he doesn't deserve the harsh and biting criticism he's getting (then again, I shouldn't forget what forum this is).

If the design problem were to design a hub in a requirements vacuum, then no problem. In that case, it truly is an easy problem and any engineer worth his salt (or future salt if he's a student) should come up with an answer easily.

But we live in the real world where such a design is constrained by convention, arbitrary historical precedent, and the interactions with other components. If the guy needs info on thread sizes so his hub will take standard axle nuts and cogs, it's an acceptable question. If he needs inner diameters so he can use off-the-shelf bearings (a valid design choice), then so be it. Those kinds of things are important if he ever plans to put this hub on a bike that won't also have to be design from the ground up.

Sorry I don't have your answers...but ignore the surly members of our "community" and keep working at it.

-- Another Engineer
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Old 08-31-10, 02:54 PM   #12
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If the guy needs info on thread sizes so his hub will take standard axle nuts and cogs, it's an acceptable question. If he needs inner diameters so he can use off-the-shelf bearings (a valid design choice), then so be it. Those kinds of things are important if he ever plans to put this hub on a bike that won't also have to be design from the ground up.
All he needs to do is some basic research and all this information is readily available on the internet. He's just being intellectually lazy, expecting us to spoon feed him the answers. The most important part of engineering education is learning to gather relevant information and then process it into a viable result. I'm really disappointed with the current crop of engineers that expect others to do their thinking for them.

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Old 08-31-10, 03:01 PM   #13
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All he needs to do is some basic research and all this information is readily available on the internet. He's just being intellectually lazy, expecting us to spoon feed him the answers. The most important part of engineering education is learning to gather relevant information and then process it into a viable result. I'm really disappointed with the current crop of engineers that expect others to do their thinking for them.

-- An engineer from another era
This.

I find it weird that with information so readily available people in my generation still expect to be spoon fed. Google is a wonderful thing.

-- An engineering student turned computer science student (not for lack of intelligence, just lack of interest)
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Old 08-31-10, 03:03 PM   #14
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And I like cats.

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Old 08-31-10, 03:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by sknoslo View Post
http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-024/000.html


Look about halfway down the page. They have dimensions of a track hub. Not a technical drawing so I'm not sure if it will be very helpful but maybe.
I think this will do. Thanks!

The thing is that it's easy and possible to find thread sizes, but try to find the information about how many turns it has to have. What is the needed distance from sprocket to flange so the spokes don't touch. How thick the flanges need to be, what is the needed wall thicknes in the middle of the hub? There are lot of questions and a googles link to wikipedias flip/flop hub just doesn't do good enough..
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Old 08-31-10, 03:44 PM   #16
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I want to do this.

-- Engineering student
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Old 08-31-10, 03:49 PM   #17
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I think this will do. Thanks!

The thing is that it's easy and possible to find thread sizes, but try to find the information about how many turns it has to have. What is the needed distance from sprocket to flange so the spokes don't touch. How thick the flanges need to be, what is the needed wall thicknes in the middle of the hub? There are lot of questions and a googles link to wikipedias flip/flop hub just doesn't do good enough..
Great hope that works out. Once you get something modeled up you should post a screen shot. And if you ever go through with machining it, post some pictures of that.

BTW, I found that link on the second page of a Google search.

Don't take any rudeness personally. It's the internet, people (including myself) are obligated to give others a hard time.

Edit: Also, if you are going to be machining from a solid block of aluminum you won't want flanges as large as the ones in the link I posted. That will not be very cost effective.

Last edited by sknoslo; 08-31-10 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 08-31-10, 03:56 PM   #18
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take a caliper to ur current hub?
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Old 08-31-10, 07:02 PM   #19
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I'm gonna suggest that if you're going to make your own hub, why make a standard track hub? One of these would be much cooler. Not to much more work either.
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Old 08-31-10, 08:16 PM   #20
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This seems like a cool idea.

-A sociology student
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Old 08-31-10, 08:27 PM   #21
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just put lots of holes in it

-an art student

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Old 08-31-10, 08:44 PM   #22
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just put lots of holes in it

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37 of them...or 41...or 33...or...
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Old 08-31-10, 09:28 PM   #23
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225
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Old 08-31-10, 09:31 PM   #24
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The most important part of engineering education is learning to gather relevant information and then process it into a viable result.
I completely agree. Though I'm not sure how personally asking people who are somewhat likely to possess the knowledge isn't a viable way of gathering relevant information. If someone comes to me and says "What airfoil section does the C-130 use?" I'm not gonna say "Go look it up...and F- you for being lazy". I'm going to provide the answer if I have it because appealing to expertise is a great way of gathering information. It's not spoon-feeding, and there's nothing inherently honorable about arriving by an answer in a harder way than necessary.

But in any case, I'm glad the OP appears to have gotten some of what he needs.
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Old 08-31-10, 09:36 PM   #25
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3's enough for me.
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