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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 09-14-10, 09:26 PM   #1
ThePritchett
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Road Tubeless on a fixed gear?

Besides the price, is there any reason this is a bad idea.

http://www.notubes.com/product_info....roducts_id/485

I ride fixed with a front brake, if it matters in this scenario...

I'm 6'2" and around 225lbs. I'm very diligent about keeping my tires at the max 110psi, but have been getting random pinch flats.

I'm a good rider and can roll up/down curbs and whatnot pretty gracefully. The flats are random in that they happen when I'm on relatively smooth ground and haven't done anything to cause the snake-bites that I find in the tubes.

I'm using the stock Kenda whatever tires that came on the Kilo TT.

I can't imagine the upgrade to Gatorskins will address the pinchflat issue.

It would be nice to go for a ride and not have to worry about flats. The Hutchinson Tubeless tires, when used with Stans rim tape and sealant seem to get pretty rave reviews from the roadies.

Is there any reason NOT to go this route on a fixed gear commuter/townie/fitness bike?
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Old 09-14-10, 09:29 PM   #2
youngandcurious
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Hmmmm if i were you id just inspect my rim and inside of tire very well before i buy new tires.
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Old 09-14-10, 09:30 PM   #3
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110psi seems a bit low for your weight, I'd get something that allows higher pressure; Rubino Pro is a good one.

Proper tire pressure will fix your pinch flat problems, use this guide as a reference:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psimet2001 View Post
I thought I would create a place to share some of the nuggets I have gotten or given while on BF. I will come back and update this thread when I think about it. Probably no more than once a day though.



Tip 1 - Inflate your tires before every single ride. Know what the proper inflation pressure should be for your tires. Inflation requirements will vary by rider, bike, tires, conditions, etc.

Below you will find equations that you can use to help determine an appropriate starting point using your weight and the tire's size. Adjust from these baselines to suit needs and conditions.

Proper inflation is the easiet way to avoid flats.

Tire Width=20: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 63.33
Tire Width=23: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 53.33
Tire Width=25: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 43.33
Tire Width=28: Pressure(psi) = (0.33 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 33.33

Tire Width=32: Pressure(psi) = (0.17 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 41.67
Tire Width=37: Pressure(psi) = (0.17 * Rider Weight in lbs) + 26.67


Example: You are 150lbs running 28's

Pressure (psi) = (0.33*150) +33.33 = 82.83psi (rear)
Front Pressure = .9*Rear Pressure = .9*82.83psi = 74.55psi front


EDIT: I added () in order to make the equations make more sense. I think some people are doing the math incorrectly.
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Old 09-14-10, 09:33 PM   #4
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What tire width are you using? have you checked your rim tape to make sure all the spoke holes are totally covered? I know someone much heavier than you and he has no issues. I see no reason to jump onto a different system, especially one that costs that much.
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Old 09-14-10, 09:38 PM   #5
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tubeless = transforming into tubulars? its like having the weight of clinchers with some of the tubular problems. dont do it, bro.
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Old 09-15-10, 05:37 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xkillemallx16 View Post
tubeless = transforming into tubulars? its like having the weight of clinchers with some of the tubular problems. dont do it, bro.
tubeless and tubular are not the same thing. tubeless seal the tire to the rim with a sealant inside, they are not full tubulars that glue to the rim.
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Old 09-15-10, 06:42 AM   #7
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I think he knows that.
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Old 09-15-10, 07:09 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xkillemallx16 View Post
...some of the tubular problems. dont do it, bro.
The only problem I've read about on the Roadie forums is that I'll need an Air Compressor to inflate the tire initially. Is there something I'm missing that is somehow related to the problems associated with tubulars?

Tubeless hase been working great in the mtb world for 10 years. There are obviously differences between mtb tires and road tires, but the limiting factor has been the tire beads ability to keep itself from blowing off the rim. The is apparently not an issue with the Hutchinson tubeless specific tires.

There are plenty of guys out there who run the tire for 3-4K miles (until it's worn) without a single flat. I want that!

To answer some of the other questions:

I'm on 23c tires.
110 is the reccomended max for the tires I currently have. Is it safe to go beyond this? On the cheap rim I have, can the sidewalls support the force of more pressure?

There are no burrs or anything on the tire or the rim. Te punctures do not happen in the same place (I align logos to valve stems) and are an obvious pinch flat. I still swear that I'm not ramming into things, but I know that'll be hard for most people to believe.
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Old 10-15-10, 01:33 PM   #9
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UPDATE:

Went with the Hutchinson Fusion 3 Tubeless kit from notubes.com.
http://www.notubes.com/product_info....roducts_id/416

I have been running them on Velocity Deep V's for about 100 miles with no problems.

The tires are pretty difficult to get on/off, but I can do it without using levers. However, I'm still carrying levers, along with a tube and some rags (for cleaning up any sealant mess) in case of flat or puncture.

Installation went much better than I had expected. With tubless tape and valve stem applied to the rim, the beads of the tire were easy to seat. After inserting sealant through the special valve stem, the tires sealed on the first try and seem to hold air better than my standard tire/tube wheelset.

I've had zero problems so far and definitely notice a more comfortable, faster feeling ride than I had from the stock Kilo TT wheels/tires. I am running 110PSI in the tubeless kit - same as in the conventional setup. I weigh 225ish plus a heavy bag.
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Old 10-15-10, 01:52 PM   #10
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I got pinch flats all the time with those crappy Kendas that come stock on the Kilo. Switched tires, flats stopped.
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Old 10-15-10, 02:41 PM   #11
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I think its a problem with your rim/tire, not warrantying a tubeless swap. but glad you're enjoy it!
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Old 10-15-10, 04:36 PM   #12
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It was a problem with pinch flats... caused by tires that aren't up to supporting my weight.

It didn't warrant the switch to tubeless, you're right. Any quality tire probably would have done just fine.

I just wanted to give it a try. As of now, I have no regrets.
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