Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    Member bryguy27007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    31
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Recommend me Bombproof Gear

    I have a Kilo TT.
    I bike 20 miles round trip to school every day on rough roads.
    I need rims and tires that can take more abuse than the stock ones.
    I've been getting flats recently.
    I'm a college student so I don't have much to spend, but since this is my primary mode of transportation to school I would like something that's going to last.
    I couldn't care less about appearances.

    I've heard B43 rims are good, but they are expensive.

    The most important thing I need is a method to stop me from getting another flat and having to walk my bike home, solid rims come second.
    Would Gatorskins be my best bet?
    I run a front brake and don't skid if that matters at all.

    Thank you very much for your time.

  2. #2
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sandy Eggo, CA
    My Bikes
    Sworks Venge; Kona Paddywagon; Ibis Mojo SL-R
    Posts
    10,054
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Errr any wheel (heck your stock kilo tt wheelset) is bombproof as long as you don't bomb it; get the logic here? Avoid jumping curbs and doing tarck for the ladies.

    Yes gatorskin's are a good bet; my streak on my commuter with gatorskins has been a year, working on another half.

  3. #3
    Member bryguy27007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    31
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have never tricked and don't jump any curbs.
    The roads I ride on are very bad and have potholes and cracks and broken glass everywhere.

    Thanks for the advice on the Gatorskins.
    They are incredibly expensive though.


    Who knows, maybe my current rims are fine, I just cringe every time I accidentally hit a pothole (can't avoid them all).
    My primary focus is on stopping flats, I should have made that more clear in my first post.

  4. #4
    Butt-Nekid Wonder zigmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    My Bikes
    99' Lemond Tourmalet, Kilo TT
    Posts
    213
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you aren't concerned with weight (even a little bit) you could try WTB thickslicks. They're supposed to be pretty rugged and they're cheaper than gatorskins.

  5. #5
    the sky is blue themeltingclock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whatever you decide is affordable for tires (I've run Gatorskins with 0 flats going on 2 years now), you should consider getting some tire liners. Gatorskins and Tire Liners should give you essentially puncture-proof tires.

  6. #6
    Painfully average. calv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Oakland/Davis, CA
    My Bikes
    all city mr pink
    Posts
    2,536
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm guessing if you want **** to last, you gotta cash the money. Of course there are alternatives? But they probably won't last as long.

    Although I'm sure you don't have to get b43's though if you want to stop cringing over potholes
    Quote Originally Posted by ThisJauntyGent View Post
    The stories about the smell are absolutely true: straight elephant dick.
    All City Mr Pink

  7. #7
    comin' in hot James1:17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Nashville bwo W. Texas
    My Bikes
    '97 Allez M2, '90 Trek 1400, 80's Univega Alpina Sport
    Posts
    695
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bryguy27007 View Post
    The most important thing I need is a method to stop me from getting another flat and having to walk my bike home, solid rims come second.
    The aforementioned tires/liners and also carry an extra tube and one of these just in case:



    It works with threaded and unthreaded cartridges, schrader and presta, will inflate to 120 psi, and is trigger controllable.
    smooth and fast?

  8. #8
    Senior Member plowmanjoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Cinelli Vigorelli
    Posts
    473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    bomb proof gear

  9. #9
    Ride heavy metal. Maddox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Teenage Wasteland, USA
    My Bikes
    '74 Raleigh LTD-3, '76 Motobecane Grand Jubile, '83 Fuji TSIII (customized commuter), '10 Mercier Kilo WT (fixed obsession), '83 Bianchi Alloro, '92 Bridgestone MB-1 (project), '83 Specialized Expedition (project), '79 Peugeot UO-8 (sold)
    Posts
    1,634
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thickslicks or Serfas Seca tires have done me well. Serfas Secas are not too expensive and have mine have stood up to many hazards.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    51
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The downside of the stock Kilo TT wheels (mine at least) is that they are heavy. Not that they are weak. Good tires and proper air pressure should fix your problems.

    For grins, what tires and PSI are you running now?
    Kilo TT
    Univega Viva Sport mixte
    '82 SR Semi-Pro (sold)

  11. #11
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sandy Eggo, CA
    My Bikes
    Sworks Venge; Kona Paddywagon; Ibis Mojo SL-R
    Posts
    10,054
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by calv View Post
    Although I'm sure you don't have to get b43's though if you want to stop cringing over potholes
    Lol his sure gonna cringe when he runs over a pothole with a b43 as it's gonna hurt his rump not to mention the how much he paid for them in the first place.

    Oh, and did I mention b43's are worth their weight in gold to bike thieves on college campuses. Better get that new york chain lock aswell as I'm pretty sure any b43 will pop out of the crowd no matter how to try to lock up your bike to campus junker bikes.

  12. #12
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,120
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For rough roads, get the widest tire you can fit in your frame. Run 32s or even 35s if you can. Although I have a feeling a Kilo TT can't accept anything nearly that wide.

    Are you getting pinch flats? Make sure your tires are inflated properly. It'll give a harsher ride but save you from getting flats. Also, if you run too low a pressure your tire can deflect enough that your rim will hit the pavement. Your rims won't last long if this happens regularly.

    For bombproof rims, get something with a high spoke count. 36 or even 40 spokes per wheel if they really get beat up. And get a beefy double wall rim. It'll be heavy but worth it if it stays straight.
    Last edited by FastJake; 10-12-10 at 07:32 PM.

  13. #13
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    10,866
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bryguy27007 View Post
    I have a Kilo TT.
    I bike 20 miles round trip to school every day on rough roads.
    I need rims and tires that can take more abuse than the stock ones.
    I've been getting flats recently.
    I'm a college student so I don't have much to spend, but since this is my primary mode of transportation to school I would like something that's going to last.
    I couldn't care less about appearances.

    I've heard B43 rims are good, but they are expensive.

    The most important thing I need is a method to stop me from getting another flat and having to walk my bike home, solid rims come second.
    Would Gatorskins be my best bet?
    I run a front brake and don't skid if that matters at all.

    Thank you very much for your time.
    It's like an e.e. cummings poem.

  14. #14
    Veteran Bastard Scrodzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    EAI Bare Knuckle / Leader 725 / 1975 Raleigh Professional Track
    Posts
    23,899
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Sounds like you'd be good with a set of DP18s and decent tires. Some people like to talk smack on Weinmanns but I weigh in at just over 200lbs, the roads around here are crap and my DP18s have served me incredibly well.

    Gatorskins are great but tend to be somewhat slippery on wet surfaces. I've had a set of Panaracer Pasela TGs for a year now, have only had one flat (my fault - pinch flat from riding with not enough psi) and they're amazing wet or dry.

  15. #15
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ciudad de Vacas, Tejas
    My Bikes
    28 frames + 73 wheels
    Posts
    7,408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +10 on the Pasela TG. I've got them on 3 different bikes, 700 x 35c, 27 x 1-1/8 and 26 x 1.5, and zero flats to date on roads with glass, potholes and metal debris. I've got the folding version which is lighter but more expensive. Very easy rolling even at relatively low pressures. However, if you want the ultimate in puncture protection, get the Ribmo. Oh, and I agree with the advice to get the widest size you can stuff in your frame.
    What, Me Worry? - Alfred E. Neuman

    Quote Originally Posted by Dcv View Post
    I'd like to think i have as much money as brains.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    im, hungary
    Posts
    1,984
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After all, when we upgrade our frames and components, what are we really paying for? We're paying for different colors and different names. Take the fixed-gear rider who purchases a $480 Mercier Kilo TT Pro from Bikesdirect:


    Well, any "hardcore" cyclist can see that this bike needs some upgrades. First of all, you need some decent pedals, clips, and straps to use with your tattered sneakers. That's at least $50.

    Also, that headset's probably got loose bearings. Sure, it might be serviceable, and in theory it will last a long time, but if you're going to be riding around on the streets (without a fender) you really need something "bulletproof." The "experts" on the various bike forums will doubtless vouch for the cost-effectiveness of this upgrade. Plus, as a bonus, "bulletproof" headsets come in a wide range of colors, and you're already a little self-conscious about riding an out-of-the-box bike. So you upgrade the headset.

    Cost: $120

    Next, you'll start thinking about those wheels. They're machine-built, and if they haven't been touched up by hand they may be going out of true. A little forum research will probably reveal that those wheels are "crap," and that they should be upgraded. Makes sense--after all, they were right about the headset. So you do it, but you only have enough money for the rear right now. First you buy the more expensive, "bulletproof" cartridge bearing rear hub by which everybody swears, and which is obviously way, way better than your current cartridge bearing rear hub:

    Cost: $170

    Of course, you're not going to put your cheap cog on that hub. Plus, the threading of the "bulletproof" hub is different anyway. So you get a cog and lockring both compatible with and worthy of your "bulletproof" rear hub:

    Cost: $80

    And it goes without saying you're not going to put that cheap rim on that hub. You're going to get something "bulletproof," and which, as a bonus, is available in colors that match your "bulletproof" headset:

    Cost: $65

    By the time you've got your spokes and nipples and someone to build it for you figure you've spend around $400. Or $450, since you're going to upgrade your tires too, and there are some cool ones that come in white.

    Now that you're ripping around town on your increasingly "bulletproof" bicycle (total cost of bike to date: $1,100) you're starting to realize that drop bars without brake hoods aren't especially comfortable. You're also not going to go "flop and chop" on an increasingly color-coordinated and "bulletproof" bicycle. No, you're thinking you might want to go with some flat bars or risers. Since your "whip" is growing increasingly "tight," you figure you'll spend a little extra on something with some flair--and which, happily, is available in a variety of colors to match your increasingly color-coordinated bicycle. And $65 isn't that much to spend on a bar, is it? Crabon bars are way more expensive. This will not only require new bars, but also a new stem, since you've got to dial in your reach. And of course inexpensive aluminum stems fail all the time. You need something "bulletproof" that's "beautifully machined" and will complement your bars.

    Cost (bar, stem, and grips): $130

    Oh, and around this time you see an almost-new front mag-style wheel on Craigslist for only $200. Your front wheel has been holding up fine, but it doesn't really match your rear. And this wheel matches perfectly. Plus, you figure it's always good to have a spare front at home. Sold.

    You've now crossed the fixie rubicon. Your whip is "tight" enough that you're becoming more involved in the "scene," and you're starting to get compliments. However, certain things are starting to bother you. You've got a sweet machined "bulletproof" stem but just a cheap aluminum seatpost. Sure, it's holding your seat in place just fine, but your stem's companion post is just so sexy. By this point you've realized you can't keep paying full retail at bike shops, so you're watching eBay constantly. Finally, you snag a practically new post with "minimal insertion marks" for $50. The money you've saved also justifies the purchase of a new seat, since the idea of clamping that cheap stock piece of foam on your sexy new post has secretly been driving you crazy. You manage to get a vintage used Italian saddle for only $45, as full of soul as it is of a stranger's ass sweat.

    Cost (post, saddle, shipping): $100

    Around this time, you find yourself shopping for a new chainring since you need to be able to change your gearing and sometimes you want to change chainrings instead of cogs. Chainrings are relatively inexpensive, so you don't feel guilty about it. But you start to realize that there aren't quite as many 1/8" chainring options for your 130bcd cranks as there are for 144bcd cranks. And anyway, you've got a pretty nice track bike now--shouldn't it run the track standard? Plus, a new crank is an investment in the future, since when you wear out your chainrings you'll have a much wider selection next time you go chainring shopping. Oh, and it has to match your "bulletproof" anodized componentry:

    Cost: $300

    By now the total cost of your Bikesdirect fixed-gear is $1,830. This figure does not include the money you've also spent on a bag, and on hats, and on clothing. And it's really bothering you--not because you've somehow quadrupled the price of your bicycle in three months, but because you've now got all this great "bulletproof" componentry on a "cheap" frame. At this point, if you just move all that stuff over wholesale to a "better" frame, you'll really have yourself a nice bike. A bike you can be proud of, and which will serve as a flag to the "scene" that you're on the premises when it's locked up outside the bar. So you spend $1,500 on a new steel frame and fork.

    You've now spent $3,300 for a $480 bike. Sure, it's a different color now and it's got a different decal on the downtube, but philosophically speaking it's the same bike. Yet you don't realize this--until it gets stolen from the front of the bar because you locked it to a chainlink fence with your u-lock.

    If you're lucky, you kept most of those old parts as well as your old frame and you can cobble a "new" bike together--which is actually your "old" bike, but which of course cost you $3,300. Or, if you're unlucky, you'll go through the whole process again and by the end of the year end up having spent $6,600. (You can't go back to "cheap" bikes now that you know what "quality" is.)

    So really, "upgrading" isn't upgrading at all--it's inflation. It might take you years to spend $100,000 on a bicycle, but don't worry, you'll get there. Since you're really just buying looks and status anyway, so you might as well get it over with.

    -bikesnobnyc

  17. #17
    I Like to Bike youngandcurious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    556
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by xkillemallx16 View Post
    After all, when we upgrade our frames and components, what are we really paying for? We're paying for different colors and different names. Take the fixed-gear rider who purchases a $480 Mercier Kilo TT Pro from Bikesdirect:


    Well, any "hardcore" cyclist can see that this bike needs some upgrades. First of all, you need some decent pedals, clips, and straps to use with your tattered sneakers. That's at least $50.

    Also, that headset's probably got loose bearings. Sure, it might be serviceable, and in theory it will last a long time, but if you're going to be riding around on the streets (without a fender) you really need something "bulletproof." The "experts" on the various bike forums will doubtless vouch for the cost-effectiveness of this upgrade. Plus, as a bonus, "bulletproof" headsets come in a wide range of colors, and you're already a little self-conscious about riding an out-of-the-box bike. So you upgrade the headset.

    Cost: $120

    Next, you'll start thinking about those wheels. They're machine-built, and if they haven't been touched up by hand they may be going out of true. A little forum research will probably reveal that those wheels are "crap," and that they should be upgraded. Makes sense--after all, they were right about the headset. So you do it, but you only have enough money for the rear right now. First you buy the more expensive, "bulletproof" cartridge bearing rear hub by which everybody swears, and which is obviously way, way better than your current cartridge bearing rear hub:

    Cost: $170

    Of course, you're not going to put your cheap cog on that hub. Plus, the threading of the "bulletproof" hub is different anyway. So you get a cog and lockring both compatible with and worthy of your "bulletproof" rear hub:

    Cost: $80

    And it goes without saying you're not going to put that cheap rim on that hub. You're going to get something "bulletproof," and which, as a bonus, is available in colors that match your "bulletproof" headset:

    Cost: $65

    By the time you've got your spokes and nipples and someone to build it for you figure you've spend around $400. Or $450, since you're going to upgrade your tires too, and there are some cool ones that come in white.

    Now that you're ripping around town on your increasingly "bulletproof" bicycle (total cost of bike to date: $1,100) you're starting to realize that drop bars without brake hoods aren't especially comfortable. You're also not going to go "flop and chop" on an increasingly color-coordinated and "bulletproof" bicycle. No, you're thinking you might want to go with some flat bars or risers. Since your "whip" is growing increasingly "tight," you figure you'll spend a little extra on something with some flair--and which, happily, is available in a variety of colors to match your increasingly color-coordinated bicycle. And $65 isn't that much to spend on a bar, is it? Crabon bars are way more expensive. This will not only require new bars, but also a new stem, since you've got to dial in your reach. And of course inexpensive aluminum stems fail all the time. You need something "bulletproof" that's "beautifully machined" and will complement your bars.

    Cost (bar, stem, and grips): $130

    Oh, and around this time you see an almost-new front mag-style wheel on Craigslist for only $200. Your front wheel has been holding up fine, but it doesn't really match your rear. And this wheel matches perfectly. Plus, you figure it's always good to have a spare front at home. Sold.

    You've now crossed the fixie rubicon. Your whip is "tight" enough that you're becoming more involved in the "scene," and you're starting to get compliments. However, certain things are starting to bother you. You've got a sweet machined "bulletproof" stem but just a cheap aluminum seatpost. Sure, it's holding your seat in place just fine, but your stem's companion post is just so sexy. By this point you've realized you can't keep paying full retail at bike shops, so you're watching eBay constantly. Finally, you snag a practically new post with "minimal insertion marks" for $50. The money you've saved also justifies the purchase of a new seat, since the idea of clamping that cheap stock piece of foam on your sexy new post has secretly been driving you crazy. You manage to get a vintage used Italian saddle for only $45, as full of soul as it is of a stranger's ass sweat.

    Cost (post, saddle, shipping): $100

    Around this time, you find yourself shopping for a new chainring since you need to be able to change your gearing and sometimes you want to change chainrings instead of cogs. Chainrings are relatively inexpensive, so you don't feel guilty about it. But you start to realize that there aren't quite as many 1/8" chainring options for your 130bcd cranks as there are for 144bcd cranks. And anyway, you've got a pretty nice track bike now--shouldn't it run the track standard? Plus, a new crank is an investment in the future, since when you wear out your chainrings you'll have a much wider selection next time you go chainring shopping. Oh, and it has to match your "bulletproof" anodized componentry:

    Cost: $300

    By now the total cost of your Bikesdirect fixed-gear is $1,830. This figure does not include the money you've also spent on a bag, and on hats, and on clothing. And it's really bothering you--not because you've somehow quadrupled the price of your bicycle in three months, but because you've now got all this great "bulletproof" componentry on a "cheap" frame. At this point, if you just move all that stuff over wholesale to a "better" frame, you'll really have yourself a nice bike. A bike you can be proud of, and which will serve as a flag to the "scene" that you're on the premises when it's locked up outside the bar. So you spend $1,500 on a new steel frame and fork.

    You've now spent $3,300 for a $480 bike. Sure, it's a different color now and it's got a different decal on the downtube, but philosophically speaking it's the same bike. Yet you don't realize this--until it gets stolen from the front of the bar because you locked it to a chainlink fence with your u-lock.

    If you're lucky, you kept most of those old parts as well as your old frame and you can cobble a "new" bike together--which is actually your "old" bike, but which of course cost you $3,300. Or, if you're unlucky, you'll go through the whole process again and by the end of the year end up having spent $6,600. (You can't go back to "cheap" bikes now that you know what "quality" is.)

    So really, "upgrading" isn't upgrading at all--it's inflation. It might take you years to spend $100,000 on a bicycle, but don't worry, you'll get there. Since you're really just buying looks and status anyway, so you might as well get it over with.

    -bikesnobnyc
    Damn!
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeetow View Post
    id ride it. after making it a fixed gear

  18. #18
    Veteran Bastard Scrodzilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    EAI Bare Knuckle / Leader 725 / 1975 Raleigh Professional Track
    Posts
    23,899
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Awesome.

  19. #19
    ℞ ♥ squeegeesunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NNJ
    My Bikes
    I ride FG,SS and old 10 speeds. Nothing else.
    Posts
    1,213
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use my stock kilo tt pro wheelset with Pasela TG, 700x23 in the front, 25 in the back. Proper air pressure = no flat ever.



    Quote Originally Posted by Johhny B View Post
    dude u need that trixie tool its the best tool ever it even comes with a bottle opener ! dude all the messengers reccomended it to me and evr since i got it im basically a mechaninc now and all the bike shops want me.

  20. #20
    Ths Hipstr Kills Masheenz cc700's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    seattle
    My Bikes
    tirove
    Posts
    8,543
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    20 miles is nothing. you should just remember to keep your tires inflated, and check them before and after every ride.

    from what i hear the stock tires are crap, but even gatorskins will flat if you forget to pump them up and hit potholes with them.

    i'd suggest lights if you ride at night. GOOD lights. magicshine comes to mind.

  21. #21
    Butt-Nekid Wonder zigmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    My Bikes
    99' Lemond Tourmalet, Kilo TT
    Posts
    213
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    xkillemallx16, that piece of writing should be published!

  22. #22
    GONE~
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    6,745
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That piece of writing is by Bikesnob.

  23. #23
    Ths Hipstr Kills Masheenz cc700's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    seattle
    My Bikes
    tirove
    Posts
    8,543
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    and is reposted anytime anyone wants to upgrade their kilo.

  24. #24
    Painfully average. calv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Oakland/Davis, CA
    My Bikes
    all city mr pink
    Posts
    2,536
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reading that actually makes me feel bad about my ideas about upgrading parts on my kilo. lol

    Hmm, need a new pedal set.. wheels.. tires.. crankset and bb.. still need lights.. fenders.. blah. I'm just going to buy a spaceship to blast alienz.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThisJauntyGent View Post
    The stories about the smell are absolutely true: straight elephant dick.
    All City Mr Pink

  25. #25
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    10,866
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Well...at least you Kilo guys are a few steps ahead of what BF used to be. The illusion used to be that anybody could turn this:


    into this:


    for only one of these:

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •