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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 03-13-11, 04:24 PM   #1
hamfoh 
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brakes rubbing rims

So I've had my mercier kilo TT for 4 days and have ridden it 3 times. This morning I'm just walking it away from where it's standing and I hear a rubbing sound. I stop, spin the wheels and notice the back rim is rubbing up against the brake lever. Now I'm always riding with headphones on so I'm not sure if this is something that happened last night or what, but there's 90 minutes max on the bike at this point and I've stuck 100% to pavement and haven't come off any curb or anything like that.

pictures best I could get with a laptop (can't find my camera). I flipped it over once to look at it, then flipped it back and it rubbed the entire time, but then I wiggled it a little and it just rubbed this one particular spot again. Spinning the wheel by itself I can't really tell if it's bent, I've only bent one once a few years ago and it was a lot easier to tell than this.

ideas/suggestions/tips? I'd like to avoid a $80 trip to the LBS if the guys who put my bike together just overtightened something or whatever
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Old 03-13-11, 04:32 PM   #2
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Just lossen your brake cable a lil.
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Old 03-13-11, 04:34 PM   #3
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here is a micro adjust on the brake that you can use to center the brake shoes on the rim...get a spoke wrench and learn to do basic wheel truing its not hard
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Old 03-13-11, 04:34 PM   #4
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It's probably just out of true. Buy a spoke wrench and google how to true a wheel. It should cost you about 8 bucks and take you about a half hour, max.

Edit: Xgecko beat me to it.
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Old 03-13-11, 04:39 PM   #5
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There should be a little hole in the brake for a allen wrench on the top of the caliper, Turn it a 1/4, I don't understand witch direction your rubbing, But turn it slowly till it one shoe is spaced out more.
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Old 03-13-11, 04:54 PM   #6
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It sounds like it could be one of two problems.

Does it just rub the rim at a certain point in the wheel's rotation? (i.e. when the wheel spins, it rubs on and off in a rhythm)
If so, your wheel is out of true and you should look up how to true a wheel

Or does it rub constantly with even pressure?
If this is the case listen to what people are saying about adjusting your brake pads and cable.

If you aren't comfortable with doing either of these things on your own, it won't cost much at your LBS. I know mine charges $8-12 to true a wheel depending on how bad it is. If you need your cable adjusted, they might even do it for free. A brake adjustment like that should take all of two minutes.
That being said, I think you could easily fix it on your own.

Last edited by EpicSchwinn; 03-13-11 at 04:57 PM.
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Old 03-13-11, 05:01 PM   #7
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thanks a lot guys, <3 bf. Yeah I need to true the wheel then. It's only one part of the wheel rotation
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Old 03-13-11, 05:14 PM   #8
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so I want to pick up some tools to work on the bike for this and projects down the future. I thought about buying the tool pack that bikesdirect sold, but I can't remember where I found it

What do you think of something like this
http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Alien-2...057951&sr=8-12

I'd like to get a good set of bike tools, without breaking the bank
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Old 03-13-11, 05:27 PM   #9
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Crescent wrench
10mm wrench
15mm wrench
A set of good metric Allen keys
A socket wrench with a 8mm Allen socket (for removing crank bolts)
Chain breaker
Tire levers
Chain whip
Lockring wrench
More metric wrenches if you wish

Slightly more advacned:
Crankpuller
Cone wrenches
Headset wrench
Bottom bracket tools
Chainring bolt holder

Advancedish:
Truing stand
Spoke keys
Dish stick
Headset press
Headset remover
Crown race setter
Starnut setter

I made a list of tools you might want to get.

Last edited by Squirrelli; 03-13-11 at 05:31 PM.
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Old 03-13-11, 05:27 PM   #10
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buying tools is best done on an as needed basis, by all means get a multi tool for emergency's but you should buy good tools for repairs this spoke wrench will do for any of your truing needs. there are plenty of threads that will help you chose what tools you will need verus what tools are just nice to have. it takes a while to build a good kit
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Old 03-13-11, 05:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirrelli View Post
Crescent wrench
10mm wrench
15mm wrench
A set of good metric Allen keys
A socket wrench with a 8mm Allen socket (for removing crank bolts)
Chain breaker
Tire levers
Chain whip
Lockring wrench
More metric wrenches if you wish

Slightly more advacned:
Crankpuller
Cone wrenches
Headset wrench
Bottom bracket tools
Chainring bolt holder

Advancedish:
Truing stand
Spoke keys
Dish stick
Headset press
Headset remover
Crown race setter
Starnut setter

I made a list of tools you might want to get.
/bows

Thanks
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Old 03-13-11, 05:41 PM   #12
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Yeah, you're gonna get sick of multi tools if you go that route. If you look for a decent craftsman (life time warranty and decent quality) tool kit with a socket set and allen wrenches, and get a couple of specialized tools like tire levers, a chain whip and a lockring tool you'll be better off. Like others have said, you acquire other stuff on an as-needed basis over a long period of time.
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Old 03-13-11, 05:42 PM   #13
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he forgot three of my most used and favorite tools: hammer, vise, bottle opener. Not necessarily in that order.
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Old 03-13-11, 05:52 PM   #14
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finding mixed reviews on each chain remover/breaker I look at. is there a thread around here with some recommendations on these tools?
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Old 03-13-11, 05:58 PM   #15
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" Chainring bolt holde"

is there a more technical term for this? my google-fu is weak *

(*no I'm not buying it all now, just making a list )
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Old 03-13-11, 06:01 PM   #16
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Chain breaker is a personal thing, but a lot of people do like this:
http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...hain+Tool.aspx

Oh, I meant chainring nut holder/tool/thing.
http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ut+Wrench.aspx
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Old 03-13-11, 06:12 PM   #17
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awesome thanks. turning this into an amazon list
http://www.amazon.com/wishlist/6NAXD...vFnb1EV4HNK_wb
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Old 03-13-11, 06:17 PM   #18
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buying tools is best done on an as needed basis
It's also a lot more expensive if you do it that way. If you're serious about being able to fully service your own bike, it's much more cost effective to plunk down the money on one of the Park Tool kits (or similar) and add on as necessary.
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Old 03-13-11, 08:20 PM   #19
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It's also a lot more expensive if you do it that way. If you're serious about being able to fully service your own bike, it's much more cost effective to plunk down the money on one of the Park Tool kits (or similar) and add on as necessary.
bah....the Park Home Mechanic starter is next to useless and the Advanced Mechanic is $300 and has tools that most people won't use more than once a year at most.......

the first block of tools listed by Squirrelli is a good place to start much of that can be picked up at Home Depot/Lowes/Ace/Napa etc with some specialized tools that can be found at a bike shop. Things like a chain whip can be made for a buck or two same with a bearing press.

if all you are riding is a Fixie you really don't need that many tools...yeah I have more tools but I have worked as a mechanic, most people don't
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Old 03-13-11, 08:31 PM   #20
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I agree with the approach of buying tools piecemeal. The majority of people purchasing tools are doing so for their own bikes, with no aspirations of becoming mechanics. To that end, it doesn't make a lot of sense to purchase a kit with tools that the average home mechanic won't ever use. Also, people get more flexibility in how their money is spent; I bought an expensive crank puller that I may never need to replace, but I bought cheap combination cone wrenches because I knew I was likely to destroy them on a stubborn wheelset. In some cases (like 4th hand/cable cutters), you wouldn't want the tool that comes in a kit.

You also get the benefit of not having to invest all that money in one shot. It's a lot easier for me to spend $30 on a pin spanner when I need it, rather than spend $300 on a tool kit and then have to wait to buy parts that require those tools.
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Old 03-13-11, 09:06 PM   #21
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I agree with the approach of buying tools piecemeal. The majority of people purchasing tools are doing so for their own bikes, with no aspirations of becoming mechanics. To that end, it doesn't make a lot of sense to purchase a kit with tools that the average home mechanic won't ever use. Also, people get more flexibility in how their money is spent; I bought an expensive crank puller that I may never need to replace, but I bought cheap combination cone wrenches because I knew I was likely to destroy them on a stubborn wheelset. In some cases (like 4th hand/cable cutters), you wouldn't want the tool that comes in a kit.

You also get the benefit of not having to invest all that money in one shot. It's a lot easier for me to spend $30 on a pin spanner when I need it, rather than spend $300 on a tool kit and then have to wait to buy parts that require those tools.
+1
I buy tools that get me through 90% of the work my bike needs. If I need a bb rebuilt or a wheel trued I send it to the LBS or borrow tools from a friend. Some of the tools are expensive and used so seldom they won't pay for themselves in 10 years.

"I didn't buy all this stuff at once, blockhead. I've lived here for fifty years. A man stays in one place long enough he tends to attract a decent set of tools."

Last edited by EpicSchwinn; 03-13-11 at 09:11 PM. Reason: relevant picture and quote
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Old 03-13-11, 09:32 PM   #22
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^this is good advice.

OP, in the immediate future, assuming your wheel isn't terribly out of true all you need is a spoke wrench to fix your wheel problem. I have this tool; use this guide to begin with.

Looking at your list, i have the following suggestions (follow or ignore them as you desire):
- You probably don't need the truing stand at this point. For simple adjustments just flip the bike upside down. I don't know anyone who's ever used a chain wear indicator, and that Pyramid sprocket remover looks like it can double as a lockring tool. I don't know for sure, though.
- You probably know this too, but just be sure your bottom bracket tool is compatible with your bottom bracket.
- I'd go ahead and splurge for as big of a crescent wrench as you can afford, 12" will probably do the trick. Found that out the hard way when i kept needing to buy ever larger ones...
- I'd also suggest what EpicSchwinn suggested and picking up a set of metric socket wrenches, combo wrenches, screwdrivers and allen keys. You need actual wrenches to properly torque your nuts/bolts. This will cost you lots but if you go Craftsman that's money you will only spend once in your lifetime. Tools like these aren't just for bikes.
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Old 03-13-11, 10:12 PM   #23
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gonna pick up a spoke wrench tomorrow and try to true them. My dog just knocked over my bike (can't wait until my hangers come in) and I move the bike and it's now doing it on the front wheel as well, but through the entire bike, i just give it a slight nudge the other way and now it only catches in one area. for something as simple as falling over should that be happening?

and yeah that wish list is more of a reminder thing. I plan on picking up the chain remover, a few wrenches, etc and then the rest as I need them. as far as the rest of the advice, thanks a lot.
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Old 03-13-11, 10:25 PM   #24
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Your wheels shouldn't be going out of true from being knocked over. I've bent spokes playing polo and the wheel stayed perfectly true. Have they ever been looked over by a professional?

If they're not properly tensioned, wheels easily go out of true through normal use.
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Old 03-13-11, 10:52 PM   #25
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well a bike shop put it together, but they're about 2 months old and it was run by hipsters. I'd hate to pay for the same service twice and I need to be able to take this bike with me when I go out of town in a few
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