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  1. #1
    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    Threaded or Threadless Fork?

    I've been asking a few questions lately because once I get my paycheck I'm getting a new fork/headset/seatpost . I'm most likely buying from ebay since I can't find an all-black carbon fork (no labels, if you know of some please share) on online retailers . My question is what is the key difference between threaded and threadless ?

  2. #2
    Senior Member vw addict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSTNv View Post
    what is the key difference between threaded and threadless ?
    that is the key difference, threaded or not. It matters as to the headset and stem you buy to go with it. Not sure if you will find a threaded carbon fork though.
    Quote Originally Posted by cc700 View Post
    there is a difference though because that extra weight will directly correlate with how many chicks huff your dongus.

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    Goes to 11. striknein's Avatar
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    Threadless forks were designed to make it easier for bicycle manufacturers to mass-produce one fork for many different sized bikes. There is no benefit to the rider between the two.

    [EDIT]: My previous statement isn't entirely true. Better threadless headsets use cartridge bearings, and I'm not aware of a cartridge bearing replacement for a threaded headset. Tradeoffs abound here, as cartridge bearings are typically replaced, while loose ball bearings or bearings in retainers can be serviced and reused several times. However, cartridge bearings usually go longer without needing service.
    Last edited by striknein; 04-18-11 at 01:06 PM.

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    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    Well the key difference I'm aware is one is threaded while the other is threadless , but you guys are basically saying either will work as long as I have the appropriate headset and stem ?

    example: 1 1/8" fork/ 1 1/8" headset (threaded or threadless)/ 1 1/8" stem ?

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    Noob. longjohns's Avatar
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    They make many cartridge bearing threaded headsets.

    The main difference I believe is stiffness. Threadless setups offer a stiffer setup than threaded. Threaded is more aesthetically pleasing (at least to me) but threadless is more practical. It also makes
    The swapping of stems and bars easier.

  6. #6
    Goes to 11. striknein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSTNv View Post
    Well the key difference I'm aware is one is threaded while the other is threadless , but you guys are basically saying either will work as long as I have the appropriate headset and stem ?

    example: 1 1/8" fork/ 1 1/8" headset (threaded or threadless)/ 1 1/8" stem ?
    Correct. You'll also need a 1 1/8" head tube.

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    Senior Member hamish5178's Avatar
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    Doesn't Woundup make threaded 1" carbon forks?
    Quote Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
    It's a fixie, reasonablility was never a factor.
    My poser bike

    my non-poser bike?

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    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vw addict View Post
    that is the key difference, threaded or not. It matters as to the headset and stem you buy to go with it. Not sure if you will find a threaded carbon fork though.
    maybe a really old one???

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    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    @striknein yeah my 727tr has 1 1/8" head tube .

    Quote Originally Posted by himespau View Post
    maybe a really old one???
    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_174894_-1___ here's one and it's new .

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    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamish5178 View Post
    Doesn't Woundup make threaded 1" carbon forks?
    yes they do but at a high premium.

  11. #11
    Senior Member oban_kobi's Avatar
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    Threadless is sexy, and somewhat easier to find, especially for carbon.
    This is super seriously.

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    Senior Member vw addict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oban_kobi View Post
    Threadless is easier to find, especially for carbon.
    This what I originally meant, almost anything can be found if you look hard enough. Especially by people that roam internet forums just looking for any opportunity to prove somebody wrong...
    Quote Originally Posted by cc700 View Post
    there is a difference though because that extra weight will directly correlate with how many chicks huff your dongus.

  13. #13
    Should be out Riding
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    The main benefit to threaded is the adjustable stem height. This is the reason I went with threaded on my newest bike.

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    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSTNv View Post
    but you guys are basically saying either will work as long as I have the appropriate headset and stem ?
    Yes. To make it more clear: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/headsets.html
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by striknein View Post
    Threadless forks were designed to make it easier for bicycle manufacturers to mass-produce one fork for many different sized bikes. There is no benefit to the rider between the two.[EDIT]: My previous statement isn't entirely true. Better threadless headsets use cartridge bearings, and I'm not aware of a cartridge bearing replacement for a threaded headset. Tradeoffs abound here, as cartridge bearings are typically replaced, while loose ball bearings or bearings in retainers can be serviced and reused several times. However, cartridge bearings usually go longer without needing service.
    Wrong. Threadless headsets are lighter, stiffer, easier to change forks with, easier to adjust, easier to service, and don't get stuck due to sweat corrosion. The stems are easier to remove handlebars from, easier to change, and cheaper to replace. Aside from asthetics, threadless is superior.
    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Dude, when you live by the Tarck sword, you die by the Tarck sword. Ashes to ashes and dust to dust.

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    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
    Yes. To make it more clear: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/headsets.html
    Thanks for the link that completely summed up my question .

  17. #17
    Goes to 11. striknein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clink83 View Post
    Wrong. Threadless headsets are lighter, stiffer, easier to change forks with, easier to adjust, easier to service, and don't get stuck due to sweat corrosion. The stems are easier to remove handlebars from, easier to change, and cheaper to replace. Aside from asthetics, threadless is superior.
    Looks like someone drank the Kool-Aid.

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    Senior Member Kayce's Avatar
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    The only thing that is possibly questionable that clink83 mentioned is the stiffness, and by experience I find threadless set ups are stiffer. He also for got to mention there is a greater variety of stem and bar options, especially on the high end.

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    With a threadless setup you're clamping a large OD stem to a large OD steerer tube. The only flex you will get is from the stem itself flexing.
    With a threaded setup you have a slip fit stem inside a small ID tube, which will have some flex no matter how strong you make it.
    Remember, if you double the diameter of a hollow tube you increase the stiffness 8x times.
    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Dude, when you live by the Tarck sword, you die by the Tarck sword. Ashes to ashes and dust to dust.

  20. #20
    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clink83 View Post
    Remember, if you double the diameter of a hollow tube you increase the stiffness 8x times.
    How so ? (i'm fairly new; i know basic building but this is like geometry ._. )

  21. #21
    Goes to 11. striknein's Avatar
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    Forks are not easier to change in a threadless system. There may be a greater variety in replacements(for reasons I already stated), but they both get installed in a similar fashion.

    And ease of adjustment? With a threadless setup you need to first loosen the stem, then tighten/loosen the star nut/compression plug, then tighten the stem bolts again, while making sure everything lines up. With a threadless setup you loosen a lockring, tighten/loosen the top nut, then tighten the lockring.

    Servicing? It's done exactly the same way, all else being equal.

    Sweat corrosion? Sweat's going to get into a headset regardless of whether it's threaded or not.

    Stems are not easier to remove in a threadless system. In a threaded system you loosen one bolt, sometimes tap it lightly to disengage the quill, and remove. In a threadless system you loosen the stem bolts, then the star nut/compression plug. Plus you get the bonus of having to re-adjust your headset every time you remove your stem in a threadless system, which is not a problem in a threaded system.

    I will concede that it's plausible that a threadless setup is stiffer, but only because it's not easy to compare apples to apples. Many of your other complaints are a symptom of stem design, not because of the type of headset. Also, many of the disadvantages you state in a threaded system are really only an issue for someone who's constantly installing and removing parts. The average rider wouldn't really need to mess with their setup all that often.
    Last edited by striknein; 04-19-11 at 05:19 PM.

  22. #22
    Goes to 11. striknein's Avatar
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    Finally, to the OP: The 727TR frame requires an integrated headset. That means you're limited to threadless forks and stems.

  23. #23
    Member JSTNv's Avatar
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    Thanks for clarifying striknein . Yeah i've tampered with a roadie I had understood how the threadless system works .

    A bit off topic , but I found this (link:http://www.iminusd.bigcartel.com/pro...on-zs3-headset) as it states it's the only integrated headset that can fit the 725 / 727tr frames . A few other forum members said I only needed a threadless headset .

    Out of curiosity would this headset work ? (link:http://www.amazon.com/Aheadset-Zero-.../dp/B003HGPQPS)

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